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Old 03-19-2015, 10:18 PM
 
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This is a tangent from this thread, but I think the linear TOD might form an extension of the old urban core. A sort of extended shopping street, with offices and apartments/condos upstairs. I imagine that such a TOD might have a transit mall.

Conceivably, linear TOD might wrap around downtown.

This is a duplicate of what I posted to another thread, but I imagine a mixed-use building of at least three stories: 1. retail at street level 2. offices or retail the next level up 3. living quarters at the top. If the structure is masonry, it might be given a little character in the form of decorative concrete blocks. I have to say that the infill buildings and apartment complexes I see popping up in Seattle are…sterile looking boxes. Like they were just thrown together.

Last edited by Tim Randal Walker; 03-19-2015 at 10:42 PM..
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Old 03-20-2015, 08:22 AM
 
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Default homeless shelters

Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Suburbs don't have to tear down to add a little density. There is available land all over the place. I am sure just about every burb has a former big box store that is looking for a tenant. This could be repurposed as mixed use or apartments. There is no requirement to change ever block, just a few here and there. Additionally, adding an inlaw apartment increases density with little impact in neighborhood scale. Densifying requires a little bit of creativity.

There are plenty of people who would want to live in the burbs if there more housing types.
I have imagined defunct malls or big box stores being turned into homeless shelters. Initially, perhaps, people bedding down on the floor in sleeping bags.

It would be desirable to find a building on a bus route.

I know that in Seattle more shelters are needed. There is a shanty town-"Nickelsville"-housed in pink tents donated by the Girl Scouts. Periodically this shanty town is pushed out, and they have to find a new location.

Later? After the economy improves? Perhaps building in communal living arrangements. I seem to recall that there used to be alternative living arrangements, such as boarding houses, for example.

Last edited by Tim Randal Walker; 03-20-2015 at 08:50 AM..
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Old 03-20-2015, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
This is a tangent from this thread, but I think the linear TOD might form an extension of the old urban core. A sort of extended shopping street, with offices and apartments/condos upstairs. I imagine that such a TOD might have a transit mall.

Conceivably, linear TOD might wrap around downtown.

This is a duplicate of what I posted to another thread, but I imagine a mixed-use building of at least three stories: 1. retail at street level 2. offices or retail the next level up 3. living quarters at the top. If the structure is masonry, it might be given a little character in the form of decorative concrete blocks. I have to say that the infill buildings and apartment complexes I see popping up in Seattle are…sterile looking boxes. Like they were just thrown together.
This is the same here in Los Angeles. There are some nice new buildings but most are just the same cookie cutter design used over and over.
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Old 03-20-2015, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Overland Park, KS
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Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
This is the same here in Los Angeles. There are some nice new buildings but most are just the same cookie cutter design used over and over.
It's the same thing in Kansas as well. The suburbs are trying to "urbanize" areas with mixed use zoning, which has turned into the same ugly cookie-cutter "luxury apartments" which just happen to share a plot of land with a strip mall. If the developer is good, at least the storefronts of the strip mall are walkable at the street with parking in the back. Most are just standard strips that happen to have an apartment complex next door. But it is "mixed use" so somehow that is hip and cool, and all of the apartments are "luxury" as if that means anything. I don't associate luxury with an ugly 1300+ unit building with little green space and few amenities.

One developer is doing it "right" with retail storefronts on the street, with lofts and apartments on the floors above; but even these buildings are getting to be cookie-cutter. Most are trying to be "modern" with character, and just look terrible.
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Old 03-20-2015, 02:42 PM
 
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I once came across a comment that ornamental ironwork is affordable. I think is due to mass production of components using molds. Online I have come across mention of other moldable materials: 1. Steel 2. Brass 3. Aluminum. Also, I believe that glass is another possibility.

I don't expect beauty from contemporary buildings. During my lifetime (I'm 58) there have been a few show piece buildings, but I generally expect bland at best. Okay, how about bland with a little character?
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Old 03-20-2015, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brianf408 View Post
It's the same thing in Kansas as well. The suburbs are trying to "urbanize" areas with mixed use zoning, which has turned into the same ugly cookie-cutter "luxury apartments" which just happen to share a plot of land with a strip mall. If the developer is good, at least the storefronts of the strip mall are walkable at the street with parking in the back. Most are just standard strips that happen to have an apartment complex next door. But it is "mixed use" so somehow that is hip and cool, and all of the apartments are "luxury" as if that means anything. I don't associate luxury with an ugly 1300+ unit building with little green space and few amenities.

One developer is doing it "right" with retail storefronts on the street, with lofts and apartments on the floors above; but even these buildings are getting to be cookie-cutter. Most are trying to be "modern" with character, and just look terrible.
I would be curious to see what these look like, because they sound a bit different than what we have here in LA (not a strip mall with residential, more like our typical apartment buildings with retail on the first floor instead of it being 100 percent residential.

Though not totally pertinent to the thread because it is in an existing urban area, here is a typical LA mixed user:
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ho...7a9a6797bdfae4

In Dublin, CA near where my in-laws live there is a large mixed-use development that is about 4 stories with residential on the top and then on the ground floor it is a large mostly-traditional shopping center iwth an enormous parking lot at the center.

Like this: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Du...327c848ef64057
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Old 03-21-2015, 02:22 AM
 
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Hate to sound pessimistic, but I think that urbanization will be done half decently only on a small scale. Why? I expect a society to excel only in what it values. What America values is a suburban lifestyle.
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Old 03-21-2015, 06:07 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
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Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
Hate to sound pessimistic, but I think that urbanization will be done half decently only on a small scale. Why? I expect a society to excel only in what it values. What America values is a suburban lifestyle.
What else would you expect from a country that was settled primarily by people who came here with the dream of getting their own land? Or a country that has as its iconic heroes frontiersmen, pioneers, farmers, and cowboys? The American dream has always been a house on its own land outside of a small town, not a penthouse apartment in a large city.
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Old 03-21-2015, 10:16 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
What else would you expect from a country that was settled primarily by people who came here with the dream of getting their own land? Or a country that has as its iconic heroes frontiersmen, pioneers, farmers, and cowboys? The American dream has always been a house on its own land outside of a small town, not a penthouse apartment in a large city.
Precisely.
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Old 03-21-2015, 10:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by munchitup View Post
This is the same here in Los Angeles. There are some nice new buildings but most are just the same cookie cutter design used over and over.
The best I have come up with is a standardized design for a city-pleasant, if bland; then add a bit of character. Then use the same design over and over in a neighborhood.

This is part of the reason that I favor historical preservation-they don't make 'em like that anymore.
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