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Old 03-16-2015, 05:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
I'm going to go ahead and make a prediction that eventually, cities will reach critical mass and will eventually have to demolish existing development to make room for denser development for residents and businesses. My question is-will they do this in the cities, and demolish existing structures there, or will they go for the less built-up areas instead and build those up (which seems more logical IMO)? If the latter, how will urban planners cope with the large parking lots, expansive office parks, cul-de-sacs, and other characteristics of typical suburbia when making a more dense area? How do you think it would be done, and how would you think it should be done? And would anyone happen to know of any real-life examples of this happening?
It highly depends on the city. Many like Detroit are a example of too much to keep up with tax base wise when things change over time. It seems more have stopped expansion by taking in more and started to concentrate on things like light rail to bring workers and others in outlaying area to central city. This means that commercial and industry does not follow the movement of people expanding to living in out lying areas. Most have found that just annexing increases the complexity and the cost of infrastructure as they get bigger and leave old areas to ; for want of a better word; rot within. With 26% of population retiring and continuing to for like Next 13 years; jobs wouldn't hold them and their wealth.
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Old 03-16-2015, 05:50 PM
 
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Discussion of transit village.
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Old 03-16-2015, 10:00 PM
 
Location: M I N N E S O T A
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Tear down whole subdivisions and rebuild your urban stuff.

something that would never happen.

so in my opinion its best to just focus on making the cities (or anywhere that already has the high density) more urban, and leave the suburbs alone.
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Old 03-17-2015, 04:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Maybe, maybe not. I know several people who don't want a yard and don't have a personal vehicle. This represents about 20-25% of the people I know!

Personally, I don't want a yard, a patio garden or window box would be more than enough for me. And I want to get rid of my car altogether. I have no desire to have a personal vehicle...car share is enough for me!

There are lots of different desires out there, but we don't build accordingly.
Would it be practical to retro fit the inner ring suburbs...for a bit of variety?

Last edited by Tim Randal Walker; 03-17-2015 at 05:06 PM..
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Old 03-17-2015, 06:55 PM
 
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What if one could acquire a sizable block of land in the inner city? The size and location would influence what you can do with it. If next to downtown it would presumably become part of the urban core. Conceivably you could get a special district-I was impressed by Country Club Plaza (Kansas City) when I visited about 30 years ago; Seattle Center is another example. Another possibility would be a satellite downtown. Another consideration-is the land on a water front?

Other considerations: 1. Historical preservation 2. "Urban Renewal", or rather, urban destruction-ripping out half decent urban fabric.

A block of land would have to be analyzed on a case by case basis.

The urban corridors/strips I have been discussing are much more constrained, therefore easier to analyze in a generic sense.

Last edited by Tim Randal Walker; 03-17-2015 at 07:20 PM..
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Old 03-17-2015, 08:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Dead malls are typically a great source for urban district redevelopments.
Must redevelopment resemble a traditional city?
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Old 03-17-2015, 09:47 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
Must redevelopment resemble a traditional city?
No, it could resemble any form, though a more traditional city is usually more acceptable.
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Old 03-18-2015, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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It will be interesting to see how cities in the San Gabriel Valley (Arcadia, Duarte, Monrovia, Azusa) to the Gold Line LRT being built through their city limits. So far the cities have made plans to redevelop their station areas in a semi urban fashion with some more pedestrian oriented retail and a couple mixed use developments as well.

One difference between this and other sprawl is that it is sort of a hybrid of sprawl suburb and streetcar suburb (the LRT is being built on existing streetcar ROWs) so the density is a bit higher and the streets are arranged in a more grid like pattern.

Here is a little article on the subject.

http://la.streetsblog.org/2014/07/07...velopment-tod/
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Old 03-18-2015, 02:50 PM
 
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Could parking be coordinated at the Azusa station? An arrangement with Target to use their parking lot as a park and ride?

Which, come to think of it, would certainly make this TOD a sort of suburban/urban hybrid.
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Old 03-18-2015, 03:24 PM
 
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I mentioned this odd conglomeration in Seattle. Somewhat dated, because Blockbuster video disappeared-this in the gussied up strip mall; which at this point has a chain drugstore. This strip mall is across the street from the parking lot of a big box store, Fred Meyer. Safeway is built at a hillside, so has an odd elevated parking lot which can be reached with an escalator (from the store interior, of course).

The stretch along Greenwood is an older shopping street, with vintage buildings. Beside retail, there is a small post office and a library branch. This bit of street is actual urbanism.

Transit? Minimalist bus stops.

This are some new buildings which seem to be specifically designed for infill. There are also new-ish apartment buildings. The surrounding neighborhood includes a city park, and vintage single family homes with yards.

Last edited by Tim Randal Walker; 03-18-2015 at 03:37 PM..
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