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Old 03-31-2014, 12:24 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,563,164 times
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The difference is that, quite often and in general, older houses can be repaired by fixing the materials that are present, rather than replacing them, and actual replacement occurs much farther out in the building's life cycle. Modern houses (and those of the past couple of decades) can be repaired, but primarily by replacement rather than fixing a component.

Nothing lasts forever, but some things last longer than others--and, in general, older homes tend to include many components with a longer life cycle. And, of course, new components that didn't exist when the house was built (central A/C, etc.) can be added later if you want them--nobody is suggesting that you heat your 1890s home with a coal stove and put your food in an icebox, as the ice man hasn't been by to deliver new ice in quite a while.
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Old 03-31-2014, 04:11 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
The difference is that, quite often and in general, older houses can be repaired by fixing the materials that are present, rather than replacing them, and actual replacement occurs much farther out in the building's life cycle. Modern houses (and those of the past couple of decades) can be repaired, but primarily by replacement rather than fixing a component.

Nothing lasts forever, but some things last longer than others--and, in general, older homes tend to include many components with a longer life cycle. And, of course, new components that didn't exist when the house was built (central A/C, etc.) can be added later if you want them--nobody is suggesting that you heat your 1890s home with a coal stove and put your food in an icebox, as the ice man hasn't been by to deliver new ice in quite a while.
You know, that just does not make sense. It seems to me, the older something is, the more sense it makes to replace rather than repair, e.g. a roof, windows, etc. I'd like to see some evidence, something always lacking in these type of posts, that new houses have to be repaired by replacing rather than fixing.

I recall reading about Lincoln's house in Springfield, IL that it's really hard to say the house today is the house he lived in, b/c just about everything had been replaced over the years.
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Old 03-31-2014, 05:40 PM
 
3,708 posts, read 2,197,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You know, that just does not make sense. It seems to me, the older something is, the more sense it makes to replace rather than repair, e.g. a roof, windows, etc. I'd like to see some evidence, something always lacking in these type of posts, that new houses have to be repaired by replacing rather than fixing.

I recall reading about Lincoln's house in Springfield, IL that it's really hard to say the house today is the house he lived in, b/c just about everything had been replaced over the years.
If something can be repaired, why replace it? Ie in my house, double paned vinyl windows would not save enough in heating bills to offset their costs. And they'd look awful. So I repai, which is easy enough to do and a lot cheaper.

Do you have the article on Lincoln's house? I know someone that worked for the NPS and what he did on the houses he worked on was amazing.
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Old 03-31-2014, 06:48 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WouldLoveTo View Post
If something can be repaired, why replace it? Ie in my house, double paned vinyl windows would not save enough in heating bills to offset their costs. And they'd look awful. So I repai, which is easy enough to do and a lot cheaper.

Do you have the article on Lincoln's house? I know someone that worked for the NPS and what he did on the houses he worked on was amazing.
I hear what you're saying. However, you can get wooden double pane replacement windows. That's what we did. Not inexpensive, but they look nice.

No, sorry, I don't have the article about Lincoln's house any more. Your friend's job sounds interesting. They also told us at Monticello (Thomas Jefferson's house) that nothing is original, but everything is "period".
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Old 03-31-2014, 07:16 PM
 
3,708 posts, read 2,197,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I hear what you're saying. However, you can get wooden double pane replacement windows. That's what we did. Not inexpensive, but they look nice.

No, sorry, I don't have the article about Lincoln's house any more. Your friend's job sounds interesting. They also told us at Monticello (Thomas Jefferson's house) that nothing is original, but everything is "period".
That's my point on the windows though. I'd also probably have to get custom as what was standard in the 20's isn't standard now. I'll never recoup the costs, so it's not worth it to me. So I repair.

My friends job was great! I was looking in the HABS site last night, I'd love to do things like that.

Something has to be original at Monticello, they couldn't have replaced the entire structure
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Old 03-31-2014, 07:20 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WouldLoveTo View Post
That's my point on the windows though. I'd also probably have to get custom as what was standard in the 20's isn't standard now. I'll never recoup the costs, so it's not worth it to me. So I repair.

My friends job was great! I was looking in the HABS site last night, I'd love to do things like that.

Something has to be original at Monticello, they couldn't have replaced the entire structure
I meant inside, e.g. wallpaper, etc.
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Old 04-01-2014, 12:23 PM
 
Location: somewhere flat
1,375 posts, read 1,218,892 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
The difference is that, quite often and in general, older houses can be repaired by fixing the materials that are present, rather than replacing them, and actual replacement occurs much farther out in the building's life cycle. Modern houses (and those of the past couple of decades) can be repaired, but primarily by replacement rather than fixing a component.

Nothing lasts forever, but some things last longer than others--and, in general, older homes tend to include many components with a longer life cycle. And, of course, new components that didn't exist when the house was built (central A/C, etc.) can be added later if you want them--nobody is suggesting that you heat your 1890s home with a coal stove and put your food in an icebox, as the ice man hasn't been by to deliver new ice in quite a while.

This is the BIG DIFFERENCE!

Also, has anyone driven around a dated development or subdivision? Nothing more depressing than early 90s diagonal siding or ornate metal faux "Victorian" doors - especially when paired with those over sized vinyl palladium windows. Or drive through a 70s subdivision - if you can still find one standing.

All I can think of are the houses in "ET" and "Poltergeist". With those big mouth garages.
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Old 04-01-2014, 12:52 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,003 posts, read 102,592,596 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoulJourn View Post
This is the BIG DIFFERENCE!

Also, has anyone driven around a dated development or subdivision? Nothing more depressing than early 90s diagonal siding or ornate metal faux "Victorian" doors - especially when paired with those over sized vinyl palladium windows. Or drive through a 70s subdivision - if you can still find one standing.

All I can think of are the houses in "ET" and "Poltergeist". With those big mouth garages.
Since you and wburg are proclaiming the Word of God here, why not give us some examples of "The difference is that, quite often and in general, older houses can be repaired by fixing the materials that are present, rather than replacing them, and actual replacement occurs much farther out in the building's life cycle. Modern houses (and those of the past couple of decades) can be repaired, but primarily by replacement rather than fixing a component."

WouldLoveTo gave an example of preferring to repair rather than replace his windows, but I'd like some good solid examples of something that has to be replaced in a newer home that can just be repaired in an older one. TIA for all your examples.

And what's this foolishness about "if you can still find a 70s subdivision standing"? Good grief. There's one right across the main road from me, and my own subdivision was built in the early 80s. Boulder CO is full of 70s homes, b/c the anti-growth people took over at that point, and not much new has been built since within the city limits.
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Old 04-01-2014, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,896 posts, read 7,657,858 times
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Windows are the best example of this; they are designed to be serviced, and they're found throughout the house. But, another example would be faucets. My kitchen sink faucet is from the early 50s. When I had the water turned on for the first time in 5 years, (according to the previous owner) this faucet leaked. I went out and spent 50 cents on some new washers, and the faucet doesn't leak anymore. Modern faucets have cartridges that can be replaced, but they aren't as simple, or as cheap as a couple rubber washers.

Vinyl siding is am example of something that is very problematic to repair. If a piece of your vinyl siding has been damaged, you can remove the damaged piece. But, it would be almost impossible to find an exact match. (color/texture) Even if you had extra siding in storage (at work, we call this "attic stock") it still would be an imperfect match due to fading.

Then, there's the example I gave earlier in this thread about a plumbing leak requiring the replacement of all subfloor that got wet. If a solid wood subfloor was allowed to dry out, after the leak was discovered, there would be no need to replace it.
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Old 04-01-2014, 01:48 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,859,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post

Then, there's the example I gave earlier in this thread about a plumbing leak requiring the replacement of all subfloor that got wet. If a solid wood subfloor was allowed to dry out, after the leak was discovered, there would be no need to replace it.
Solid wood floor subflooring can rot and wrap if is wet long enough.
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