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Old 04-01-2014, 09:14 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,816,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Windows are the best example of this; they are designed to be serviced, and they're found throughout the house. But, another example would be faucets. My kitchen sink faucet is from the early 50s. When I had the water turned on for the first time in 5 years, (according to the previous owner) this faucet leaked. I went out and spent 50 cents on some new washers, and the faucet doesn't leak anymore. Modern faucets have cartridges that can be replaced, but they aren't as simple, or as cheap as a couple rubber washers.
Nor do they wear out as quickly, nor will letting them sit cause the seal to fail, because the seal is a ceramic disc rather than rubber. Sure, it'll cost you $25.00 to replace a cartridge, but most likely you'll never have to.

Quote:
Then, there's the example I gave earlier in this thread about a plumbing leak requiring the replacement of all subfloor that got wet. If a solid wood subfloor was allowed to dry out, after the leak was discovered, there would be no need to replace it.
I'm not a great fan of OSB, but I expect it to improve. It used to be that plywood would tend to delaminate; it got better.
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Old 04-01-2014, 09:49 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by warren zee View Post
Perhaps they are standing but they are ugly and dated. And shoddily built.
Funny how no one refers to the Victorian homes of the late 19th century or the bungalows of the early 20th c. as "dated". You don't have to like them, and I take issue with "shoddily built". The 70s house we owned was way better built than the fifties house we lived in.
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Old 04-01-2014, 09:56 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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The 50s home you keep mentioning seems unusually bad for that era.
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Old 04-01-2014, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
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The building I live in is circa 1958. Interestingly enough the sound proofing is excellent compared to all new construction multi family I have been in around here. I hardly hear anything other than water from above (I.e. The shower) in the bathroom. Generally is nothing but the loudest stuff (like my neighbors band practice). New buildings you hear everything from the neighbors.
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Old 04-01-2014, 10:25 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The 50s home you keep mentioning seems unusually bad for that era.
Well, maybe, who knows? But that house was extremely "basic", two bedrooms, one bath, living room and small kitchen with metal cabinets and hardly any counter space. That's it! No garage, in a climate with a harsh winter. Our 70s house had three bedrooms, a family room with fireplace in addition to the living room, decent sized closets, two bathrooms, a large eat-in kitchen, a 1 car garage.
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Old 04-02-2014, 04:59 AM
 
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I don't know but American and Canadian houses built from about 1998 and later are incredibly ugly for the most part.
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Old 04-02-2014, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,893 posts, read 7,653,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Funny how no one refers to the Victorian homes of the late 19th century or the bungalows of the early 20th c. as "dated". You don't have to like them, and I take issue with "shoddily built". The 70s house we owned was way better built than the fifties house we lived in.
I agree with you here. A lot of Victorians and Craftsman bungalows were "remuddled" over the years because people thought they were dated. But, now we appreciate them. The same is now true for Mid-century Modern. In another 20-30 years, people will start to appreciate the Brady Bunch look, and lament that so much of it was ripped out.
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Old 04-02-2014, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,893 posts, read 7,653,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well, maybe, who knows? But that house was extremely "basic", two bedrooms, one bath, living room and small kitchen with metal cabinets and hardly any counter space. That's it! No garage, in a climate with a harsh winter. Our 70s house had three bedrooms, a family room with fireplace in addition to the living room, decent sized closets, two bathrooms, a large eat-in kitchen, a 1 car garage.
Comparing your 50s house to your 70s house is like comparing apples to oranges.

When I think about houses like this, I use the old GM hierarchy of: Cadillac, Buick, Oldsmobile, Pontiac, and finally Chevrolet, to think about who they were built for. And, there are exceptions that, IMO, still don't fall on this scale. A tar-paper shack would be well below the level of "Chevrolet," and the Biltmore Estate would be far above the level of "Cadillac."

Your 50s house sounds like it would be a low-end Chevrolet of its time, and your 70s house sounds like it might have been a Pontiac or Oldsmobile of its time.
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Old 04-02-2014, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spicymeatball View Post
I don't know but American and Canadian houses built from about 1998 and later are incredibly ugly for the most part.
That is totally in the eye of the beholder. To me houses built in the 50's, 60's, 70's, and even some of the 80's are ugly- with the nicest looking ones being from the last 5-10 years.
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Old 04-02-2014, 09:42 AM
 
5,682 posts, read 8,752,084 times
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A comment on the rotten wooden subfloor- most of the older solid subfloors - 1x6 or 1x8 construction can hold up pretty well to occasional water leaks. Problems arise in bathrooms with continual leaks but they are small in area.

My guess is the person who had all the subfloor go bad may have been in a situation where the AC in the house was very cold over a humid basement. So you have condensation in the subfloor. It's rare but I've heard of this happening. One way to avoid this is keep your AC thermostat higher than the dew point.
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