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Old 03-29-2014, 01:19 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Is that typical of 50s houses? I think in the 50s I've been in (and lived in) it was installed with central heating. Older homes usually have radiators, I've seen rather old looking radiators in old houses that had to have been pre-1950s.



50s homes in New England and downstate NY rarely had central A/C. Homes with built in A/C didn't become the norm until maybe the 80s. Certainly most Massachusetts homes don't have central A/C, though most have room A/C. Probably most NYC apartment buildings from that era don't have central A/C either (all from the last 100 years had heat*). I think most, of not almost all, were built with central heating (radiators). I'd guess most didn't have built in garages.

*100 year old NYC apartment buildings seem to have too much heat rather too little. Windows open in mid-winter!
I don't know if it's typical of 50s homes or not. I thought it very strange myself, in that climate. I'm not debating A/C; I'm just quoting the article. It was becoming common in Champaign by the 1960s.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Are those older homes, though? I thought ranch homes didn't become common until the 50s.
LA dates mostly from the 40s and on. The BIL's house was built in the 70s. There are few truly old homes in most parts of CA. The old bungalows I've seen pictures of in LA are not particularly "passive solar".
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Old 03-29-2014, 01:28 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I don't know if it's typical of 50s homes or not. I thought it very strange myself, in that climate. I'm not debating A/C; I'm just quoting the article. It was becoming common in Champaign by the 1960s.
I take it you haven't spent much time in other 50s homes, visiting or living?

And yes, I know you weren't debating A/C, I was just adding info to the quote.
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Old 03-29-2014, 01:32 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I take it you haven't spent much time in other 50s homes, visiting or living?

And yes, I know you weren't debating A/C, I was just adding info to the quote.
Well, I lived in that place in Urbana, IL. When I was a kid, a lot of my friends lived in 50s houses, but I didn't pay too much attention to detail at that time. My own neighborhood was more "This Old House" territory, though they weren't all big and charming.

Obviously, houses were built w/o furnaces there; I would not be surprised if that were the case in the upper south as well, e.g. Kentucky.
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Old 03-29-2014, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
One of my links says this about central heating: **Additional amenities of a 1940s home would include items that are thought of as necessities by today's building standards. For instance, a hot water heater, barbecue patio, double garage, and/or heating system would be included in the sale of a specific home.**

Another says this: **As with older homes, post-war home listings call out materials and design features, but they also mention modern conveniences. For instance, listings of 1940s homes mention central heating and air-conditioning. **
I saw those, and I suspect it must be a regional thing. (i.e. central heat was probably much rarer in warmer climates) Or, maybe central heating systems became less common--especially in low-end/starter homes--in lieu of local heaters during the 40s and 50s, per your 1953 example? But I can assure you that central heating was common prior to the 1940s, at least in this part of the country.

Quote:
Yes, new kitchens try to mimic the old, but with some twists. In those cases, there is usually a "work island" with a countertop on which the cook can work.
Some of the amenities we expect in our kitchens isn't even standard around the first world. In Italy, (per House Hunters International ) kitchen cabinetry is still considered furniture, and is often taken when the owners move. I had a friend from New Zealand who thought it strange that we Americans used upper cabinets in our kitchens. So, they might not think a vintage 1910s or 20s kitchen is so strange.

Quote:
I have posted about the house we rented that was built in 1953, with no central heating, just a big space heater in the living room, that was poorly plastered over when a furnace was added later.
As I mentioned above, this house was probably an example of a starter home built quickly and cheaply as part of the post-war housing boom. My aunt and uncle lived in a house built in 1953 that had the original hydronic base-board heating system, with a central boiler. But, it was a mid-grade house.

Quote:
I was just talking to someone a few days ago about newspaper being used as insulation in an old house. Obviously, this didn't insulate a whole lot, and was a fire hazard.
Yeah, newspaper insulation seems like a terrible idea. My old house has no insulation, and I think I prefer that. LOL. Also, thanks to one of the links you provided, I've decided I'm not going to insulate the walls, unless I have a reason to have them open, and can also install a vapor barrier.
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Old 03-29-2014, 01:46 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
LA dates mostly from the 40s and on. The BIL's house was built in the 70s. There are few truly old homes in most parts of CA. The old bungalows I've seen pictures of in LA are not particularly "passive solar".
For the LA Metro, 12% of housing is from before the 1940s, for the San Francisco Metro (excludes Santa Clara County / Silicon Valley) 20%. From the link, San Francisco/Oakland suburbs are rather newer than other metro with similar amounts of old housing stock, there's a larger city-suburb contrast than most.

America's Oldest Cities | Newgeography.com
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Old 03-29-2014, 02:03 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Well, I lived in that place in Urbana, IL. When I was a kid, a lot of my friends lived in 50s houses, but I didn't pay too much attention to detail at that time. My own neighborhood was more "This Old House" territory, though they weren't all big and charming.
I guess besides Urbana and where you grew up, 50s homes weren't that common? The are I grew up in most houses were 50s or 60s.

Quote:
Obviously, houses were built w/o furnaces there; I would not be surprised if that were the case in the upper south as well, e.g. Kentucky.
There as in Urbana or somewhere else?
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Old 03-29-2014, 03:06 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I saw those, and I suspect it must be a regional thing. (i.e. central heat was probably much rarer in warmer climates) Or, maybe central heating systems became less common--especially in low-end/starter homes--in lieu of local heaters during the 40s and 50s, per your 1953 example? But I can assure you that central heating was common prior to the 1940s, at least in this part of the country.



Some of the amenities we expect in our kitchens isn't even standard around the first world. In Italy, (per House Hunters International ) kitchen cabinetry is still considered furniture, and is often taken when the owners move. I had a friend from New Zealand who thought it strange that we Americans used upper cabinets in our kitchens. So, they might not think a vintage 1910s or 20s kitchen is so strange.



As I mentioned above, this house was probably an example of a starter home built quickly and cheaply as part of the post-war housing boom. My aunt and uncle lived in a house built in 1953 that had the original hydronic base-board heating system, with a central boiler. But, it was a mid-grade house.



Yeah, newspaper insulation seems like a terrible idea. My old house has no insulation, and I think I prefer that. LOL. Also, thanks to one of the links you provided, I've decided I'm not going to insulate the walls, unless I have a reason to have them open, and can also install a vapor barrier.
Every country does things a little differently. I've heard that many European homes don't have closets in the bedroom, either. They use those "wardrobe" pieces of furniture you sometimes see in older homes here. But really, so what? That's not how it's done in the US! In a US house, you expect to have kitchen counters built in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I guess besides Urbana and where you grew up, 50s homes weren't that common? The are I grew up in most houses were 50s or 60s.



There as in Urbana or somewhere else?
There as in Urbana.
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Old 03-29-2014, 03:48 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Every country does things a little differently. I've heard that many European homes don't have closets in the bedroom, either. They use those "wardrobe" pieces of furniture you sometimes see in older homes here. But really, so what? That's not how it's done in the US! In a US house, you expect to have kitchen counters built in.
Well, that in this day and in a modern place, some of what might considered standard in some places isn't even considered the usual, it may not really be a need.
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Old 03-29-2014, 03:50 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,013 posts, read 102,621,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Well, that in this day and in a modern place, some of what might considered standard in some places isn't even considered the usual, it may not really be a need.
Kitchen work space is a need, unless you eat every meal out.
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Old 03-29-2014, 03:53 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Kitchen work space is a need, unless you eat every meal out.
Well yes, I can't remember seeing any place without it. Nor in any homes in England I've seen.
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