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Old 04-06-2014, 11:15 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kidphilly View Post
Most are on a main drag but not exclusive to it

There are many (probably hundreds) in Philly that are not on the main drag - many more that are though

A town square generally is more a hub of different types of activity, vibrant and mixed in use - generalities but hold true based on my experience in both more urban and less urban areas. Town squares are a type of meeting place and function a lot as public gathering spaces - generally in some form of urban setting - whether that be a city proper or small town core.
I would guess that in Philly there are many "main drags". Certainly there are in Denver.

You guys and your "mixed use" mantra!
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Old 04-06-2014, 02:22 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I would guess that in Philly there are many "main drags". Certainly there are in Denver.
As urbanlife said, some of those streets are quite small. If every little street is a main drag, then it doesn't mean much. Kidphilly could give more examples.

Quote:
You guys and your "mixed use" mantra!
What on earth does that mean?
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Old 04-06-2014, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I would guess that in Philly there are many "main drags".
Yes, there are. And since restaurants and other retail establishments tend to gather where there is traffic -- foot and auto alike -- you won't find many on lesser traveled side streets. Even the neighborhoods have their "main drags", aka business districts.
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Old 04-06-2014, 02:40 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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These sidewalk cafes are definitely not on a main street:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Stone...40.13,,0,-2.28

Ditto with that Northampton view I posted
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Old 04-06-2014, 02:43 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
As urbanlife said, some of those streets are quite small. If every little street is a main drag, then it doesn't mean much. Kidphilly could give more examples.



What on earth does that mean?
Already answered by ohiogirl81, but good grief! Philly has what, 1 1/2 million people, and we're supposed to believe it has ONE main street? Good grief, in northwest Denver where I used to live, every third east-west street (actually called avenues) is a "main" street. That's where the traffic is funneled, where there are traffic lights instead of 4 way stops every other block, and where the commercial areas are. Some are more commercial than others, but all are "main" drags with significant traffic flow.

"Mixed use" is used so often to mean just about anything. It's trite.
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Old 04-06-2014, 02:54 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Already answered by ohiogirl81, but good grief! Philly has what, 1 1/2 million people, and we're supposed to believe it has ONE main street? Good grief, in northwest Denver where I used to live, every third east-west street (actually called avenues) is a "main" street. That's where the traffic is funneled, where there are traffic lights instead of 4 way stops every other block, and where the commercial areas are. Some are more commercial than others, but all are "main" drags with significant traffic flow.
How'd you turn my post into saying the entire city has one main street?

If you mean "main drag" as being through streets plenty of streets with restaurants in Philadelphia aren't particuarly good through streets, though they are usually commercial:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=resta...52.67,,0,10.32
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Old 04-06-2014, 03:09 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,990 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
How'd you turn my post into saying the entire city has one main street?

If you mean "main drag" as being through streets plenty of streets with restaurants in Philadelphia aren't particuarly good through streets, though they are usually commercial:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=resta...52.67,,0,10.32
kidphilly used the term "THE" main drag, referring to Philadelphia. Yes, restaurants are on commercial streets. Commercial streets have traffic. That's what this whole hijack has been about. People have been claiming that they know of outdoor cafes on streets that don't have traffic, or much traffic. What would be the point of opening your restaurant somewhere that has no traffic? No one would know it was there.
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Old 04-06-2014, 03:12 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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My post above is outdoor seating for a restaurant on a street with no car traffic though some foot traffic.
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Old 04-06-2014, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
kidphilly used the term "THE" main drag, referring to Philadelphia. Yes, restaurants are on commercial streets. Commercial streets have traffic. That's what this whole hijack has been about. People have been claiming that they know of outdoor cafes on streets that don't have traffic, or much traffic. What would be the point of opening your restaurant somewhere that has no traffic? No one would know it was there.
No one is claiming these places exist without traffic, a successful town square is one that is full of foot traffic and makes it easy for one to walk to the nearby establishments that surround a town square.
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Old 04-06-2014, 03:33 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I would say many of the streets in Philly are very small streets that tend to be more pedestrian friendly, which makes for a great atmosphere for outdoor cafes.
Philly famously has five squares. One is taken up by City Hall and has no cafes on it. One is now a traffic circle, though there have at times past been various restaurants with sidewalk seating on it. One is a rarely-used concrete plaza with a lightning bolt sculpture in it, near the Ben Franklin Bridge. One is Washington Square which had fallen on hard times; not sure what it's like now. And there's Rittenhouse Square -- jackpot, tons of sidewalk cafes.

There's also plenty on Second Street, Chestnut and Walnut. All of which are busy streets, but not the "main drag", which would be Broad Street (not much in the way of sidewalk activity) and Market Street (some near the east end.
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