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Old 04-01-2014, 09:48 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Eastern PA is much older, the towns are older and laid out differently, e.g. with town squares. The east is separated from the west by a mountain range. The west is more Midwestern looking, more grids (though Philly has a grid).
Portland and Seattle both have town squares in their downtown, not the kind you would find in Europe, but then again those squares were built long before cars ever existed.
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Old 04-01-2014, 09:55 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Portland and Seattle both have town squares in their downtown, not the kind you would find in Europe, but then again those squares were built long before cars ever existed.
Denver has

Civic Center Park, which functions as a timeshare doublespeak, but the eastern towns have actual squares. I'll post some pictures when I'm not on my kindle.
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Old 04-01-2014, 10:04 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Denver has

Civic Center Park, which functions as a timeshare doublespeak, but the eastern towns have actual squares. I'll post some pictures when I'm not on my kindle.
Here's Portland. Brick square:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=pione...0,4.02&start=0

Seems more like a true square than most out here. Union Square in Manhattan is a bit more like a small park, though mostly brick surface:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Union...,-1.46&start=0
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Old 04-01-2014, 10:28 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Please do when you get the chance because I am not sure I understand what you are saying, I have seen town squares on the east coast and they look similar to what can be found on the west coast.
https://www.google.com/search?q=bloo...w=1760&bih=856

https://foursquare.com/v/chambersbur...e028944/photos

Greencastle and Waynesboro have town squares, too, but I can't find any decent pictures.

I was saying these squares are not like Civic Center Park.
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Old 04-03-2014, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Default Town Squares

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'm ending this hijack. You don't understand; you don't want to understand; you just want to make fun of the fountains. ..... I bet Bloomsburg and Chambersburg .....
I am not sure what it going on at your end, but that is not what I am doing at all. Not once have I made fun of Bloomburg or Chambersburg, I thought both of them looked like really cute little towns, but what you were pointing out as a town square isn't what one would call a town square. If you want to see what a town square should look like.

It should look like this.

Home - Jennifer Houze Photography

This is a town square in Prague, notice how it is people using the space around the fountain and statue rather than cars. That is because it is a place for people to gather. Places like this town square is what Portland's Pioneer Courthouse Square was built after.
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Old 04-03-2014, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,528,523 times
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Default Town Squares

An off topic conversation made me wonder what everyone's definition of what a town square is and the benefits they can have for cities. And to open up the topic even more, is the idea of a town square something that can also be applied to suburban areas in the us? Also, to broaden the topic even more, are there town squares in the US and other countries that you like, and is there downtowns in the US that could add a town square to their city and where should it be?


For me, I have always been impressed with Pioneer Courthouse Square in Portland, it has earned the name as Portland's Living Room. I have been to festivals that have happened on it, movies, sports matches of the big screen, or just sitting and people watching while enjoying a sunny day. The model Portland used is a reflection of what is used in European cities.


Home - Jennifer Houze Photography

This is a town square in Prague, notice how it is people using the space around the fountain and statue rather than cars.

This I Portland's Pioneer Courthouse Square.


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Old 04-03-2014, 09:28 AM
 
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Eweh and UGH! Too much concrete and barrenness for my tastes. I prefer grass and parks. Who wants to gather in what looks like an parking lot.
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Old 04-03-2014, 09:28 AM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,351,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
I am not sure what it going on at your end, but that is not what I am doing at all. Not once have I made fun of Bloomburg or Chambersburg, I thought both of them looked like really cute little towns, but what you were pointing out as a town square isn't what one would call a town square. If you want to see what a town square should look like.

It should look like this.

Home - Jennifer Houze Photography

This is a town square in Prague, notice how it is people using the space around the fountain and statue rather than cars. That is because it is a place for people to gather. Places like this town square is what Portland's Pioneer Courthouse Square was built after.
So if it looks like a giant parking lot but isn't then it doesn't "disrupt the urban fabric", but if it looks like a giant parking lot and is then it "disrupts the urban fabric". A bit hypocritical?

A "town square" need not be a large unused space in the middle of town. Plenty of other town squares are based around a central amenity (e.g., courthouse) with other commercial enterprises surrounding them. They also have ROADS going around them so that people can get there from where they live and so the businesses there can ship and receive.

This continued focus on a "place for people to gather" sounds like something out of a bad sci-fi movie. Self-proclaimed planners seem to think that people are herd animals except for the planners who know best for the rest of us. The common thread among your posts is cramming people together whether it's by transit, housing density, or other means. Gotta tell you that most people do not share your desire to live like hamsters.
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Old 04-03-2014, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,528,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Eweh and UGH! Too much concrete and barrenness for my tastes. I prefer grass and parks. Who wants to gather in what looks like an parking lot.
That is called a town square, what you are wanting is called a "park." Town Squares and Parks are not the same thing. And to answer your question, lots of people gather in this places which do not look like parking lots, or at least the one in Portland does not look like a parking lot.
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Old 04-03-2014, 09:38 AM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,860,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That is called a town square, what you are wanting is called a "park." Town Squares and Parks are not the same thing. And to answer your question, lots of people gather in this places which do not look like parking lots, or at least the one in Portland does not look like a parking lot.
I guess. Too much an Chicagoan.

I like:
Grant Park (Chicago) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Grass, trees and plants and things. Green space. Those lack that and without that they look like almost any other piece of concrete in an concrete city.
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