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Old 04-09-2014, 11:44 PM
 
Location: East coast
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The Canadian economy depends on the American economy a lot by trade, and it's said that one of the bridges at the border crossing with Detroit is one of the most economically valuable routes in the world between two nations (in international trading).

Why does it seem like Canadian cities aren't really part of the Rust Belt and thus face the sudden and catastrophic decline that wracked the cities who lost their manufacturing base? Is it because there was not really manufacturing industry jobs in Canadian cities and Canada relies more on natural resources and services, which were unlikely to go overseas? Did this keep their cities and towns more vibrant and populated?
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Old 04-10-2014, 07:01 AM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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The cities of Southern Ontario had very significant manufacturing bases, which were just as important to their economies as in the Rust Belt. I think this applies to other parts of Canada too, like Montreal. They did suffer significantly from the loss of manufacturing jobs due to globalization, I think the key differences are:

-less of a difference between the fate of the suburban and urban parts of cities (metro areas)
-no sunbelt to leave for
-Toronto was Canada biggest city, which meant it had other industries that could replace manufacturing, and it would continue to be the main destination for immigration, allowing it to continue to prosper. Much of the growth experienced by other cities in Southern Ontario is basically spill-over wealth from Toronto.
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Old 04-10-2014, 01:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
The cities of Southern Ontario had very significant manufacturing bases, which were just as important to their economies as in the Rust Belt. I think this applies to other parts of Canada too, like Montreal. They did suffer significantly from the loss of manufacturing jobs due to globalization, I think the key differences are:

-less of a difference between the fate of the suburban and urban parts of cities (metro areas)
-no sunbelt to leave for
-Toronto was Canada biggest city, which meant it had other industries that could replace manufacturing, and it would continue to be the main destination for immigration, allowing it to continue to prosper. Much of the growth experienced by other cities in Southern Ontario is basically spill-over wealth from Toronto.
Basically this. Parts of Windsor and Niagara Falls are probably the closest to the stereotypical view of Rust Belt that you can find in Canada. Maybe industrial areas of Hamilton due to being a big steel producing city/area.
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Old 04-10-2014, 10:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Basically this. Parts of Windsor and Niagara Falls are probably the closest to the stereotypical view of Rust Belt that you can find in Canada. Maybe industrial areas of Hamilton due to being a big steel producing city/area.
I heard Hamilton fell on hard times for a while . . . but it seems like the provincial and fed govt's are more invested in a smooth transition to a new industry and paying to retrain people whereas, in the US it's just "the market will figure out."
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Old 04-13-2014, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Canada
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Southern Quebec also did suffer alot from de-industrialization, and didn't have all of the wealth from Toronto to spill over into it. Cities like Trois-Rivieres in Quebec aren't as awful as many American rust belt cities, however, because Quebec is something of a closed society due to the language so people didn't just leave the province on mass, and because the different culture and lack of racial divisions means that despite the economic depression, a city like that isn't high crime and White Flight was never going to be a factor in its fate. Strong social services and social solidarity also mean that things have never been allowed to become quite so desperate as they were in the Rust Belt for the ex industrial workers. I think much of this stuff is at play in Ontario cities like Windsor as well, which has one of Canada's lowest murder rates and lowest crime rates despite being directly across the river from Detroit and having a very, very similar economic fate as far as auto-manufacturing struggling. That lack of crime means central Windsor has done MUCH better then Detroit as far as not being abandoned, even if people struggle economically. The way that schools are funded by the province in Canada, rather then at the level of school districts in the States, also contributed to keeping people in the cities, because doing so wasn't a death sentence for your child's future in the same way if you were a family that wanted to remain in a community that was on a down swing.

Last edited by BIMBAM; 04-13-2014 at 05:43 PM..
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Old 04-13-2014, 06:00 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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Canadian cities didn't have to deal with racial segregation during the "white flight era" to the same degree that nearly every American city experienced. It has been argued that suburbanization was largely a manifestation of racial segregation.
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Old 04-13-2014, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Have you been reading the thread? Have you ever been to Canada? Toronto is highly suburbanized.
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Old 04-13-2014, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Have you been reading the thread? Have you ever been to Canada? Toronto is highly suburbanized.
Except that it wasn't really at the expense of the core like in much of the Rust Belt. Anyways, Toronto is not really like the Rust Belt economically (as I described in my first post), but some cities like Windsor, Brantford, Winnipeg, Hamilton, and apparently Trois-Rivieres (I think Saint John too) have had similar economic slow downs due to loss of industry.
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Old 04-14-2014, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
Except that it wasn't really at the expense of the core like in much of the Rust Belt. Anyways, Toronto is not really like the Rust Belt economically (as I described in my first post), but some cities like Windsor, Brantford, Winnipeg, Hamilton, and apparently Trois-Rivieres (I think Saint John too) have had similar economic slow downs due to loss of industry.
Points taken. I was just using Toronto as an example of a highly suburbanized Canadian city.

I thought everyone knew that auto manufacturing was huge in Canada "back in the day". (Referring to OP, not you.) I once had a Ford Pinto built in Canada.
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Old 04-14-2014, 02:14 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I thought everyone knew that auto manufacturing was huge in Canada "back in the day". (Referring to OP, not you.) I once had a Ford Pinto built in Canada.
Ontario (I think) still makes more cars than any US state. Well, not last year:

Michigan usurps Ontario as auto-making king - The Globe and Mail
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