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Old 04-16-2014, 10:27 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
Plenty of downtowns - even in small cities - had a JC Penney store; I walked into one in Cambridge, Ohio, as late as the mid-90s. No doubt it's gone now. They were much smaller than any mall stores, but they were everywhere, just like Woolworth, Kresge and G.C. Murphy.


Ditto.
Well yeah, I'm talking more like the 50s. Beaver Falls had a Sear's catalog store. I think you could order stuff there, also have it delivered there. They had a big Ward's store. I was jealous that my brother got his clothes there while our mom made mine. I don't remember a Penney's.
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Old 04-16-2014, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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The problem is that there are no longer other box stores to fill the ginormous space. Most big box chains are contracting or saturated.
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Old 04-17-2014, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,473 posts, read 5,144,766 times
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It seems that many of the malls could be reworked as micro-communities for young people where housing, recreation, entertainment and entrepreneurial office space could come together. The massive parking lots could be downsized and repurposed with green space and enviro-friendly housing options.
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Old 04-17-2014, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Northern Maine
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I saw them as facilities to house the homeless, but Lincolnian has a slightly more optimistic vision. I hope some malls end up that way. It's a nice vision. How would you heat it in the North or cool it in the South?
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Old 04-17-2014, 09:06 AM
 
56,593 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Yes, there was one at Carousel Center/DestinyUSA here in a Syracuse, but it went out of business within a couple of years or so.

What was interesting was the other day, I actually was in a small city which had a JC Penney's in a plaza, which is very rare. It essentially is the only department store in this city and if it ever closed, the closest department store would be about a 20-25 minute drive away. So, in instances like that, those communities may be where a JCP or Sears stays in place.
Here's a streetview of the store: https://maps.google.com/maps?q=osweg...151.58,,0,2.63
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Old 04-17-2014, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,732,288 times
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Default "Too old" to shop at malls??? How so?

Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
I think the suburban mall as we know it is a dying (or at least shrinking) trend. It's becoming harder and harder for the working and middle class to afford higher-end items at the typical mall anchor stores (Macy's, JC Penney's, etc-Sears seems to be an exception here but is still failing because it's being poorly run). Also, the communities that used to support malls when they were built in the 50s, 60s, and 70s are now becoming older and are no longer interested in shopping at malls anymore, which is a big factor. That's the case at my local mall-everyone's too old to shop there now, so it closed.....
I haven't read the whole thread, so I'm sorry if this has been addressed, but I don't get this about being "too old" to shop at malls. How can someone be too old to shop at a mall? I am 70 and where I shop now is driven by the same factors as when I was 20 - mostly convenience of location and value for price. Mall or not a mall makes no difference to me.
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Old 04-17-2014, 11:31 AM
 
2,034 posts, read 2,429,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fletchman View Post
I don't do a ton of mall shopping, but I find JCPenney has decent prices for most items. Their selection could be improved, however. About five years ago, I purchased a fantastic pair of Stafford shoes for work and they held up really well, even better than a pair of expensive Brooks Brothers shoes. Of course, they no longer sell much in the way of Stafford shoes anymore, which is too bad because I would have purchased another pair of shoes from them.

JCPenney always seems to be packed when they have a sale, at least here in Columbus, Ohio.
JCP was always a bit cheaper in terms of merchandise but now they are really poor quality and that drives customers away. Sell a higher quality product and charge a little more; at least they would have a market to sell to. They removed some of their most successful brands from their stores.
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Old 04-17-2014, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,699 posts, read 8,488,284 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lincolnian View Post
It seems that many of the malls could be reworked as micro-communities for young people where housing, recreation, entertainment and entrepreneurial office space could come together. The massive parking lots could be downsized and repurposed with green space and enviro-friendly housing options.
You need high local land prices to make this financially viable. This is basically what's happening to every mall withing a 20 mile radius of Vancouver, but I don't think you could finance it if prices were too low. Here's a couple of those developments, but in such an environment it usually results in an expansion of the mall rather then a contraction:


Brentwood Mall Redevelopment.m4v - YouTube


BT Vancouver: Oakridge Redevelopment Project - YouTube
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Old 04-17-2014, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,473 posts, read 5,144,766 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Maine Land Man View Post
I saw them as facilities to house the homeless, but Lincolnian has a slightly more optimistic vision. I hope some malls end up that way. It's a nice vision. How would you heat it in the North or cool it in the South?
It could be reworked for a 21st Century life style using available green energy options and incentives. Commercial solar and geothermal heating along with roof top gardens for fresh local sourcing of organic fruits and vegetables are just a few ideas. A mixed use facility that serves on-site residents as well as the general public could be social meeting places for the young as well as excellent opportunities for employment and interaction for the disabled and elderly members of society that have less mobility. Doctors and other support services could be satellite facilities connected to nearby hospitals.

There is a large growing autistic population that has very few opportunities to find much needed social connections and employment. This could be an excellent opportunity to provide independent living with employment, education and support services in the same location.

Many opportunities exist to repurpose, reuse and recycle declining properties for a greater purpose. It certainly would be better than just building the same stores every 5 or 10 miles selling the same things.
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Old 04-17-2014, 01:44 PM
 
Location: San Antonio-Westover Hills
6,878 posts, read 18,214,854 times
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I think Sears needs to go back to its roots. Go back to Sears, Roebuck & Co if they can use that name. Then they need to shutter all of their stores except for maybe one large store in Chicago, building it from the ground up, working from some of their turn-of-the-century products but with modern twists. Like a giant Cabela's-meets-the-old-Macy's-Cellar but even more awesome than either of those. Where you go in and say, "WOW." The key would be USA made, USA materials. They need to revisit their craftsman bungalows and begin to sell kit homes again, only even easier to make than in prior years (where you had to have some carpentry skills) and simplified (electrical work included in purchase, or similar). You could order it online, and finance it online. No big mortgage to deal with. Just simple financing.

That could turn Sears, Roebuck, and Co. around, or at least save them from disappearing. Then they could begin to look at expansion into regional markets.
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