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Old 04-17-2014, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
445 posts, read 1,250,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
There's a Macy's 5 miles to the south in downtown Brooklyn, the shopping cliente is largely black, I'm curious how differently it's stocked.
That Macy's (Fulton Street) is in my neighborhood. It's not well-stocked; it's basically a lower-middle class store, a far cry from 20 years ago when it was A&S. They have some designer stuff but nothing really upscale. It's geared toward more urban fashions/sportswear. I read recently that Macy's is planning on doing a makeover of that store which is long overdue. Brooklyn is so "hot" right now and Macy's needs to keep up. A lot of people don't really think of going to Macy's for anything. My son lives literally across the street from that Macy's and when he needs a household item, my first thought is to send him to Target, half a mile away.
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Old 04-17-2014, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Oceania
8,623 posts, read 6,281,771 times
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Forget JC Penny, what is that store really known for? It was just another Montgomery Ward. I actually liked Wards better for some reason. I grew up in the 60s and Sears and Roebucks was a staple for anything a middle class family could have wanted.
Sears virtually invented the mail order catalog(Christmas wish book) and you cannot beat Kenmore appliances or Craftsman tools. My most memorable bike as a kid was a Sears Spyder bike. That thing beat me up as badly as I beat it up. I wonder where it is today?

I have decades old Kenmore washer/dryer and refrigerator - stove is about 15 years old. 95% of my tools are Craftsman and is my first choice. Sure, I could buy Snap On or MAC but the cost is wholly prohibitive. How many places can you take a broken tool back, no matter it's age, and get a replacement with no questions asked? If they don't have your exact model you often get an upgrade.

Years ago some laborers I had working for me at a shopping center found a dumpster behind Sears full of broken tools. They took them into the store and got new replacements. They were all going at once and I told them to slow it down so they wouldn't get suspicious. They got me a new 100 pc socket set. I put it on Sears management for being stupid as those tools should have been shipped out somewhere. I am sure it happens all the time. I often look for broken Craftsman tools and retrieve them for replacements. I have a limb pruner going back this year.

Sears may be irrelevant to younger generations but those of us who grew up with the stores and know their worth still appreciate them. As far as being a mall anchor...I would prefer Sears as a stand alone store.
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Old 04-17-2014, 07:08 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,921,216 times
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I just don't know if this economy can support all the department stores out there. Sear's and Penney's compete with Target and TJ'Maxx now.
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Old 04-18-2014, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
563 posts, read 442,454 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armory View Post
How many places can you take a broken tool back, no matter it's age, and get a replacement with no questions asked? If they don't have your exact model you often get an upgrade.

Years ago some laborers I had working for me at a shopping center found a dumpster behind Sears full of broken tools. They took them into the store and got new replacements. They were all going at once and I told them to slow it down so they wouldn't get suspicious. They got me a new 100 pc socket set. I put it on Sears management for being stupid as those tools should have been shipped out somewhere. I am sure it happens all the time. I often look for broken Craftsman tools and retrieve them for replacements. I have a limb pruner going back this year.
Wow, you must be really proud of yourself. First you tell us about your fond memories of Sears, then you tell us how you rip them off. So, you "put it on Sears management" do you? That way you don't have to take any blame, do you? You're the same as a common shoplifter. Fraudulent returns are a form of theft. They did not put that policy in place so unethical people like you could make false returns and get brand new merchandise because you are too cheap and dishonest to actually buy their merchandise. If Sears does go under, I hope you're happy knowing that you played a small part in that.
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Old 04-18-2014, 01:33 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,921,216 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
JcPenney's seems to do good when it's in a strip mall vs an enclosed mall. We have two JcPenney's in a strip mall here as well.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/jc...605ac70c8306e3

Our Sear's, that's in a strip mall, is not doing good. I think even if Sear's was out of malls, they would not do as good.

http://s3-media1.ak.yelpcdn.com/bpho...C6NEjvmQ/o.jpg

Here's a JcPenney's in an brand new lifestyle center-outlet mall combo that I think will shut down sometime.

jcpenney at The Promenade Shops at Orchard Valley in Manteca, CA :: 209-923-6233 - CA
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Old 04-20-2014, 09:20 PM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,683,367 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
I haven't read the whole thread, so I'm sorry if this has been addressed, but I don't get this about being "too old" to shop at malls. How can someone be too old to shop at a mall? I am 70 and where I shop now is driven by the same factors as when I was 20 - mostly convenience of location and value for price. Mall or not a mall makes no difference to me.
Well, I'm not saying that age affects whether someone shops at a mall or not, but rather how much they go to that mall or what they go for there. I apologize if I am making assumptions or stereotyping, but as people get older, they tend to shop more frugally and don't buy as many luxury goods/clothes/etc, like those you might find at malls. Malls nowadays seem to be geared towards goods and luxuries stores, with necessities becoming less common (clothing stores are often higher-end and you will almost need find a grocer at a mall). Those of older generations become less interested in these items, as they stick with the basic essentials and find less and less need to go buy higher-end items that aren't totally necessary. They also become less interested in being out-and-about, and won't want to go shopping as often.

In contrast, younger crowds will often be more willing to spend money. Often, teenagers will go to a mall to socialize and will end up shopping for fun. Younger 20-somethings might go shopping for the trendiest clothes or gadgets. Even 30-year or 40-year olds will take their kids to malls to shop for clothes or toys or something. Those groups will have the time, energy, and willingness to go shop at malls for the sake of shopping at malls.

Because of this difference, when the demographic shifts towards older ages (like it did in my local community), the malls will suffer as there will be less out-and-about young people sustaining the businesses there. This is exactly what happened to my local suburban mall, and it seems to be happening to all the original malls from the 50s/60s whose surrounding demographics are aging pretty quickly. As for the newer malls, they will all suffer the same fate, just later on. Will new malls keep popping up? Likely not, as they face increased threats to their viability as an idea from online shopping, strip malls, and other methods of shopping. The malls look like they will decline, if not disappear entirely, within the next couple decades.
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Old 04-21-2014, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,805,128 times
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^^^^^ Thanks. That makes sense to me (post #76).
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Old 04-21-2014, 08:05 AM
 
56,994 posts, read 81,365,580 times
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I came across this website that kind of gets into the changing of the retail landscape of cities and the stores that are gone, but maybe not forgotten: The Department Store Museum

Looking at that website makes me wonder if we could ever go back to that to some degree.
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Old 04-21-2014, 12:55 PM
 
1,380 posts, read 1,895,653 times
Reputation: 2384
I have to admit that I'll be sad to see the mall go. For those of us in Middle America, it's one of the few public spaces around that are hospitable to walking around, seeing friends and strangers, and so on without all the cars and asphalt. Yes, you have to drive to get there, but it's a nice enough climate controlled pedestrian friendly environment once you've arrived. Strip malls, which seem more popular now, even under the absurd euphemism "lifestyle center" require dodging traffic and managing the weather and all. Not as pleasant.
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Old 04-21-2014, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,463 posts, read 60,058,857 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armory View Post
Forget JC Penny, what is that store really known for?
JC Penney is known for its home goods: bedding, curtains and blinds, linens, etc. I buy a lot of draperies and hardware there; the quality is excellent and the selection is way above what you'll find at Target. Its clothing for women especially was always a notch above Sears or Montgomery Ward (but a notch below Spiegel).

Sears always seemed to make a more masculine slant to its merchandise: Toughskins, Craftsman, The Men's Store. Although about 15 years ago I was in a wedding on New Year's Eve, and as the only attendant I could wear whatever I chose. I found the perfect green velvet dress at Sears, of all places. LOL Sears could contract to being a hardware and appliance company without many people noticing. Sears' hard goods are worth purchasing, by all means.

The Sears store in my hometown was downtown until a new mall opened in the mid-70s; JC Penney was in a mall built in the 50s until the newer mall opened. After JC Penney left, the older mall became deserted - a result of failed urban renewal and the downward spiral of the neighborhood surrounding it which began long before the new mall was a glimmer in some developer's eye. The old mall became an outlet mall for awhile, and now houses home health care and similar companies.
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