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Old 04-21-2014, 04:33 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,995 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059

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Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
Well, I'm not saying that age affects whether someone shops at a mall or not, but rather how much they go to that mall or what they go for there. I apologize if I am making assumptions or stereotyping, but as people get older, they tend to shop more frugally and don't buy as many luxury goods/clothes/etc, like those you might find at malls. Malls nowadays seem to be geared towards goods and luxuries stores, with necessities becoming less common (clothing stores are often higher-end and you will almost need find a grocer at a mall). Those of older generations become less interested in these items, as they stick with the basic essentials and find less and less need to go buy higher-end items that aren't totally necessary. They also become less interested in being out-and-about, and won't want to go shopping as often.

In contrast, younger crowds will often be more willing to spend money. Often, teenagers will go to a mall to socialize and will end up shopping for fun. Younger 20-somethings might go shopping for the trendiest clothes or gadgets. Even 30-year or 40-year olds will take their kids to malls to shop for clothes or toys or something. Those groups will have the time, energy, and willingness to go shop at malls for the sake of shopping at malls.

Because of this difference, when the demographic shifts towards older ages (like it did in my local community), the malls will suffer as there will be less out-and-about young people sustaining the businesses there. This is exactly what happened to my local suburban mall, and it seems to be happening to all the original malls from the 50s/60s whose surrounding demographics are aging pretty quickly. As for the newer malls, they will all suffer the same fate, just later on. Will new malls keep popping up? Likely not, as they face increased threats to their viability as an idea from online shopping, strip malls, and other methods of shopping. The malls look like they will decline, if not disappear entirely, within the next couple decades.
Actually, as DH and I have gotten older, we have more disposable income (especially now that the nest is empty and kids are self-supporting), and we're more willing to spend money on higher quality stuff. When we were younger, we had to be more frugal. It's true we don't need as many clothes these days; I have a half-closet full of scrubs, which I wear to work, and DH now has a job where he wears jeans. He buys his shirts at Kohl's.
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Old 04-22-2014, 03:25 AM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,889,790 times
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many of the suburban things r going....enclosed malls, enclosed skating rinks, video arcades, and drive in movie theaters. Watch the next replacement for Sear's and JcPenney's........Walmart Neighborhood Market. They can take up to 60,000 sq. ft.

my town still has a drive in movie theater and bowling alley and an outdoor skating rink thanks to the college students supporting the economy. In a couple years we are getting an outdoor mall, aka lifestyle center, but still wished we still had our enclosed mall.

the lifestyle center is pretty much a downtown. that's the draw for lifestyle centers, bringing a downtown experience to the suburban areas of America. In some cases, bringing to communities that have no downtown.

if you ask me, i like the look of enclosed mall over the new lifestyle centers. vintage is hip to me.
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Old 04-23-2014, 06:38 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,099,778 times
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Sears is generally the only reason I visit malls. Craftsman tools + levis in one location? Yep I'll make that trip twice a year.
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Old 04-24-2014, 12:39 AM
 
1,110 posts, read 908,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
many of the suburban things r going....enclosed malls, enclosed skating rinks, video arcades, and drive in movie theaters. Watch the next replacement for Sear's and JcPenney's........Walmart Neighborhood Market. They can take up to 60,000 sq. ft.

my town still has a drive in movie theater and bowling alley and an outdoor skating rink thanks to the college students supporting the economy. In a couple years we are getting an outdoor mall, aka lifestyle center, but still wished we still had our enclosed mall.

the lifestyle center is pretty much a downtown. that's the draw for lifestyle centers, bringing a downtown experience to the suburban areas of America. In some cases, bringing to communities that have no downtown.

if you ask me, i like the look of enclosed mall over the new lifestyle centers. vintage is hip to me.
Drive-in movie theaters are already dead. Video arcades are dying because it's relatively easy to purchase a video game system and several games that have more depth and don't require you to pay $1 every time you die. Suburban things aren't going, they're just being replaced my more advanced technologies.
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Old 04-24-2014, 02:40 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,889,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orlando-calrissian View Post
Drive-in movie theaters are already dead. Video arcades are dying because it's relatively easy to purchase a video game system and several games that have more depth and don't require you to pay $1 every time you die. Suburban things aren't going, they're just being replaced my more advanced technologies.
i stick with computer games. much more cheap than console games and u need a computer anyways to do other things. ps4, xbox 720, and wii u are WAY pricey. $50 for a game, $300 or so for a console, yikes.

there is still a drive-in movie theater in my town. also 2 in the county next to ours. Why you ask? first they host the swap meet there and number two it's WAY cheaper.

I think Sear's and JcPenney's both could survive after shutting at least 200 stores. Macy's has about 850 stores (including bloomingdales). Nordstrom's, Dillards, Bon-Ton stores, Saks, Lord and Taylor, and Neiman Marcus range from 100-200 stores. Obivously not every area is going to have your upscale department store.

Macy's has stores that cater to working class or upper middle class. Penney's and Sears seem to service middle and working class.

The upscale department stores seem to serve the upper class.
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Old 04-24-2014, 06:27 PM
 
56,588 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by orlando-calrissian View Post
Drive-in movie theaters are already dead. Video arcades are dying because it's relatively easy to purchase a video game system and several games that have more depth and don't require you to pay $1 every time you die. Suburban things aren't going, they're just being replaced my more advanced technologies.
I think drive-ins are going strong in certain areas. There are about 5 active ones within an hour drive or so from me.
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Old 04-25-2014, 06:12 AM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,674,215 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I think drive-ins are going strong in certain areas. There are about 5 active ones within an hour drive or so from me.
They really only seem to be popular as a novelty though, I don't think anybody's scrambling to build new ones.
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Old 04-26-2014, 07:28 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,889,790 times
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What are the middle class and working class clothing stores of today anyways? And the name for outdoor malls, lifestyle center, is lame if you ask me. The name I call them is "town center mall" because that's what this type of malls intention is to be, to be a mall that mimics a "town center or downtown".

I can think of the upper middle class stores of today:

Wet Seal, Victoria Secrets, J. Crew, J. Jill, Men's Warehouse, H&M, Banana Republic, Pottery Barn, Anthropologie, lulumon Athletica, Abercrombie, etc...

I am guessing your middle class and working class stores are the teeny popper stores these days like the Wet Seal, Hot Topic, PacSun, Claire's, Gap, etc...and now all the big box stores like Target, Wal-Mart, Ross, Old Navy, K-Mart, Sear's, JcPenney's, TJ'Maxx, etc...

All the town center malls I know of seem to cater to the upper middle class. Most anchored by a movie theater, a Macy's or Dillard's, Target, health food market, or junior department store like Nordstrom's Rack.
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Old 04-26-2014, 09:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,995 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
What are the middle class and working class clothing stores of today anyways? And the name for outdoor malls, lifestyle center, is lame if you ask me. The name I call them is "town center mall" because that's what this type of malls intention is to be, to be a mall that mimics a "town center or downtown".

I can think of the upper middle class stores of today:

Wet Seal, Victoria Secrets, J. Crew, J. Jill, Men's Warehouse, H&M, Banana Republic, Pottery Barn, Anthropologie, lulumon Athletica, Abercrombie, etc...

I am guessing your middle class and working class stores are the teeny popper stores these days like the Wet Seal, Hot Topic, PacSun, Claire's, Gap, etc...and now all the big box stores like Target, Wal-Mart, Ross, Old Navy, K-Mart, Sear's, JcPenney's, TJ'Maxx, etc...

All the town center malls I know of seem to cater to the upper middle class. Most anchored by a movie theater, a Macy's or Dillard's, Target, health food market, or junior department store like Nordstrom's Rack.
My choices for middle/working class clothing stores these days in my area would be Kohl's and Macy's.
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