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Old 04-15-2014, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Couldn't you say that for Toronto as well?
In the inner core West is fairly working class, at least originally, since it is gentrifying, the working class quadrant then shifts NW to follow the Weston Rail corridor (had a fair bit of industry), leaving the West/Southwest more mixed. Inner East was more streetcar suburbs and not as industrial as Inner West/Central Toronto, and developed later, although areas near the Portlands/Don River mouth are more working class, and that are was more industrial. Then East of Coxwell it gets more working class, continuing into Scarborough, and even Durham Region is one of the cheaper suburban areas (along with Brampton, in the NW quadrant). North is the only quadrant that's consistently wealthy (at least North of Bloor).
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Old 04-15-2014, 08:11 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
In the inner core West is fairly working class, at least originally, since it is gentrifying, the working class quadrant then shifts NW to follow the Weston Rail corridor (had a fair bit of industry), leaving the West/Southwest more mixed. Inner East was more streetcar suburbs and not as industrial as Inner West/Central Toronto, and developed later, although areas near the Portlands/Don River mouth are more working class, and that are was more industrial. Then East of Coxwell it gets more working class, continuing into Scarborough, and even Durham Region is one of the cheaper suburban areas (along with Brampton, in the NW quadrant). North is the only quadrant that's consistently wealthy (at least North of Bloor).
That's pretty much it, though I'd add the following:

Traditionally the area east of downtown, or what we can call the east-central area today was the poorest area of the city. And after WWII, there was a lot more low-income and public housing built there. Condo development is much more skewed toward the west-central area or western edge of downtown, and the University of Toronto campus is west of downtown as well. So a visitor to Toronto would probably get the sense that west is more affluent.

The west side of the city core feels somewhat more "urban" than the east side which as you say is more "streetcar suburb"-type development. Both sides have seen gentrification, but I would say the west is considered more "hip" and as a general rule you'll pay more for equivalent housing in the west, though it would vary by neighborhood. However North Toronto is the most affluent area of the (old) city proper and has traditionally been middle and upper middle class.

In terms of the metropolitan area, wealth is most concentrated north of downtown, running from Yorkville at the northern edge of downtown, into North Toronto and the former elite suburb of Forest Hill, and into early postwar-suburban York Mills. North of Highway 401 it remains pretty affluent (Willowdale, Thornhill). There is a secondary concentration of wealth in the western part, including the Kingsway and Central Etobicoke, Port Credit and Oakville. Oakville is the most affluent suburban municipality. But it's not as consistent and a lot of it is working class to middle-middle class. East (Scarborough, mostly but out to Ajax) is generally more working class.

A mostly working class buffer zone runs northwest. It's basically began in the Junction and Mount Dennis (early 1900s industrial suburbs that were then the periphery) and has continued to spread into Downsview, Rexdale, Malton (where the airport is) and Brampton.

So if you were to survey, say, the partners at a Bay St. law firm or the doctors at a downtown hospital I would guess (excluding the ones who live right downtown) a majority would live north of downtown, a minority would come in from the west and practically none would live in the northwestern or eastern parts of the Greater Toronto Area.
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Old 04-15-2014, 08:18 PM
 
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In Philadelphia, the affluence is centered on Center City. North, South, West, and Northeast are less affluent. Philly doesn't have an east side; that would be Camden, NJ. The larger metro area is donut-ish, with the outer city neighborhoods, Camden, and some of the inner suburbs being poorer and then more wealth further out.
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Old 04-15-2014, 09:04 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
In most of North America, the dominant winds blow from west to east.

When the early industrialists started building their factories, they built them in the east ends of cities, and built their homes in the west where they wouldn't be exposed to the pollution.

That's why the west sides of cities tend to be the historically prosperous and that the east sides tend to be more working class.
Coors Brewing is in the far western Denver suburb of Golden.
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Old 04-15-2014, 09:11 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Coors Brewing is in the far western Denver suburb of Golden.
Perhaps the local don't mind the scent of freshly brewed beer, eh Coors.

Last edited by nei; 04-15-2014 at 09:20 PM..
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Old 04-15-2014, 09:14 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Perhaps the local don't mind the scent for freshly brewed beer, eh Coors.
They probably look at it (or smell it) as we did back in W PA in the steel days. It meant a paycheck!
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Old 04-15-2014, 11:25 PM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
In Philadelphia, the affluence is centered on Center City. North, South, West, and Northeast are less affluent. Philly doesn't have an east side; that would be Camden, NJ. The larger metro area is donut-ish, with the outer city neighborhoods, Camden, and some of the inner suburbs being poorer and then more wealth further out.
I thought that the outer West and Northwestern city neighborhoods in Philadelphia were at least solidly middle class or am I wrong about that?
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Old 04-15-2014, 11:40 PM
 
56,582 posts, read 80,870,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
That's pretty much it, though I'd add the following:

Traditionally the area east of downtown, or what we can call the east-central area today was the poorest area of the city. And after WWII, there was a lot more low-income and public housing built there. Condo development is much more skewed toward the west-central area or western edge of downtown, and the University of Toronto campus is west of downtown as well. So a visitor to Toronto would probably get the sense that west is more affluent.

The west side of the city core feels somewhat more "urban" than the east side which as you say is more "streetcar suburb"-type development. Both sides have seen gentrification, but I would say the west is considered more "hip" and as a general rule you'll pay more for equivalent housing in the west, though it would vary by neighborhood. However North Toronto is the most affluent area of the (old) city proper and has traditionally been middle and upper middle class.

In terms of the metropolitan area, wealth is most concentrated north of downtown, running from Yorkville at the northern edge of downtown, into North Toronto and the former elite suburb of Forest Hill, and into early postwar-suburban York Mills. North of Highway 401 it remains pretty affluent (Willowdale, Thornhill). There is a secondary concentration of wealth in the western part, including the Kingsway and Central Etobicoke, Port Credit and Oakville. Oakville is the most affluent suburban municipality. But it's not as consistent and a lot of it is working class to middle-middle class. East (Scarborough, mostly but out to Ajax) is generally more working class.

A mostly working class buffer zone runs northwest. It's basically began in the Junction and Mount Dennis (early 1900s industrial suburbs that were then the periphery) and has continued to spread into Downsview, Rexdale, Malton (where the airport is) and Brampton.

So if you were to survey, say, the partners at a Bay St. law firm or the doctors at a downtown hospital I would guess (excluding the ones who live right downtown) a majority would live north of downtown, a minority would come in from the west and practically none would live in the northwestern or eastern parts of the Greater Toronto Area.
I forgot about Rexdale, Lawrence Heights(in former North York) and Brampton being in the West.

What made me think of the East being more working class is that places like Scarborough, Pickering, Ajax and Oshawa and Whitby is where much of the auto industry is located in the metro and knowing a little bit of the Basketball scene with schools like Eastern Commerce and West Hill Collegiate being on that side, I thought that the split was more stark.
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Old 04-16-2014, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Florida
4,103 posts, read 4,273,738 times
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lol Jacksonville Fl is weird. The northside is the most dangerous part of town, the westside is where the rednecks are, the southside is actually the south east and is where most of the banking/financial/insurance jobs are. There is no eastside, its just the beaches which is a separate City. The money is all along the riverfront, theres no "rich area" here except extremely small pocket neighborhoods.
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Old 04-16-2014, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Paris
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In Paris, the west is most affluent and northeast is poorest. That's true for both the city center and the suburbs. The southeast and northwest quadrants are more mixed.


Income map, red is above average, green is below (the outer areas on this map are rural):


http://sigr.iau-idf.fr/webapps/visiau/
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