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Old 04-20-2014, 11:12 PM
 
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Most rivers in the US flow South
therefore most of the time people live on the North side and poor people live on the South side
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Old 04-21-2014, 12:18 AM
 
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There was a similar forum a while back I saw. Minneapolis doesn't fit the mold. The area called North Minneapolis (The Northwest quadrant of the city) is the poorest and most dangerous. NE Minneapolis and South Minneapolis (The SE quadrant of the city) are generally middle class. Southwest Minneapolis is upper middle class to wealthy.
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Old 04-21-2014, 07:52 AM
 
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In Bristol (UK), the River Avon flows west and generally the richer neighbourhoods are to the north of the river, with the poorer neighbourhoods to the south. There are also more wealthier areas to the north west than there are to the north east!
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Old 04-21-2014, 09:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dopo View Post
Most rivers in the US flow South
therefore most of the time people live on the North side and poor people live on the South side
I would argue that this only applies to cities where the river runs straight through the city. For cities that are on a river, but not necessarily around it (St. Louis, Memphis, Minneapolis, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, etc.) it doesn't necessarily apply; the cities may have areas that surround the river, but its not like the city's residential areas reside right on the river's borders.
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Old 04-21-2014, 12:41 PM
 
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Here in Memphis, poorer people tend to live on the north and south sides of town. Well to do people live in between, close to Poplar Ave, which is, with few exceptions, very nice all the way from Downtown out to Collierville. Suburban neighborhoods far from Poplar have a shelf life of about 25 years from development to decline. I'm no expert on St Louis, but I was under the impression, that it worked similarly, with the north side being especially bad and the south side being merely working class Whites, but the money laid out linearly east to west right through town from downtown condos to the Central West End all the way out to Creve Coeur and points beyond in St Louis County.
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Old 04-22-2014, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Planet Earth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Here in Bayonne, NJ it is East/West. As for socioeconomic divide, I am not really sure, overall it is pretty middle class.
I've heard that in Bayonne, further west is generally a little wealthier (though there really aren't any poor or rich areas). It makes some sense, since the east side is closer to the oil refineries and also closer to the train tracks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by King of Kensington View Post
Philadelphia - center city and outer suburbs, not clear if there's any directional bias (isn't the Main Line west or northwest of Philadelphia?)
Northeast.

It's funny that the general trend is for the south side to be poorer, but I've actually associated the north side with being poorer (here in NYC, northern Brooklyn, northern Manhattan, and northern Staten Island are generally poorer than the southern parts of those boroughs, and those are the boroughs I'm most familiar with, though as was said, the overall metro distribution is more donut-shaped). I had also heard that the northern sections of St. Louis, Philadelphia, and Miami are generally poorer than the southern portions, before I heard about cities like LA, where the reverse is true.
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Old 04-22-2014, 06:03 PM
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Location: Foot of the Rockies
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In Omaha, the northeast area is probably the lowest income. Income also seems to increase in general as one goes west (from the Missouri River).
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Old 04-22-2014, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
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Duluth is traditionally an West - East city, "West" actually referring to the "southwest" compass position, and "East" to the "northeast" compass position. Ignoring the remainder of the city which does not fit the dichotomy, the western neighborhoods tend to be poorer and more working- or lower-class. The eastern neighborhoods tend to be either overrun with students, who quintuple-up in sometimes decrepit 1890-era housing, or more well-to-do people.

The city is centered on downtown, whose residents tend to be poor and publicly housed, although luxury condominiums were built at the height of the housing bubble. Just uphill from downtown, the Central Hillside (and East Hillside) neighborhoods are poorly regarded, despite their views, which I think are some of the best the city has to offer:


Central Hillside por tvdxer, en Flickr

As I have often noted, this area (especially where it mainly consists of brick rowhouses) would be gentrified by yuppies, hipsters, and DINKs if it were any other city. House values are dirt cheap and you are far more likely to find a 25-year-old single mother with a GED who smokes Newports and accesses Facebook on her cell phone regularly than you are a 35-year-old yuppie couple with college degrees who chose their location because they admire the view.

Interestingly, the Whole Foods Co-Op (not to be confused with the chain, although they are alike) is located in the East Hillside. They are building another location in a rather blighted area.
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Old 04-23-2014, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post
As I have often noted, this area (especially where it mainly consists of brick rowhouses) would be gentrified by yuppies, hipsters, and DINKs if it were any other city. House values are dirt cheap and you are far more likely to find a 25-year-old single mother with a GED who smokes Newports and accesses Facebook on her cell phone regularly than you are a 35-year-old yuppie couple with college degrees who chose their location because they admire the view.

Interestingly, the Whole Foods Co-Op (not to be confused with the chain, although they are alike) is located in the East Hillside. They are building another location in a rather blighted area.
This is what the "hood" looks like in Oakland:

https://www.google.com/maps/@37.7697...9z6j68KN-g!2e0

It doesn't look so bad does it. But that is in one of the roughest parts of town. In California is a little weird. The "hood" doesn't work the same way as it does in the east? Where things are completely abandoned and falling apart. We don't get many of those blocks. In LA and Oakland (cities that are oddly similar in layout and architecture) the sketchy areas look a lot like this.
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Old 04-23-2014, 05:28 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post

It doesn't look so bad does it. But that is in one of the roughest parts of town. In California is a little weird. The "hood" doesn't work the same way as it does in the east? Where things are completely abandoned and falling apart. We don't get many of those blocks. In LA and Oakland (cities that are oddly similar in layout and architecture) the sketchy areas look a lot like this.
Cute houses! Stucco ones look neat! Housing demand increased enough in New York City that abandonment is almost all gone. Here's some of the worst areas of the city:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Brown...339.57,,0,6.58

Fences are commmon in the city, fences that tall are a red flag, or a relic from two decades ago.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=eucli...54.77,,0,12.56

streets at least aren't empty of people. South Bronx. New infill on left, old stuff on right:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Mott+...,299.52,,0,5.5

Might not be the worst corner, I'm not personally familiar with these areas. Okay, abandonment. This probably was housing at one time:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Mott+...128.01,,0,9.57
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