U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-19-2014, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
7,841 posts, read 7,341,108 times
Reputation: 13779

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Oh, not this again! Straight out of the "Conspiracies 101" syllabus! And I know this will ignite a firestorm, but even in "walkable" neighborhood with decent transit options, people own cars. City planners know this. That's why they require parking.
Agreed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-19-2014, 10:09 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,037,172 times
Reputation: 14811
Quote:
Originally Posted by ALackOfCreativity View Post

The way they work is that towns have to have a certain amount of affordable housing - and most of the nicer ones don't - and if they don't meet that requirement developers can sue the town to be able to build it regardless of local zoning. So what happens is, developers buy land, threaten to sue the town to build affordable housing unless they can ignore local zoning to build whatever they want (which is almost always dense, market-rate luxury housing using as much of the land as possible), and the town then complies because hey, it's better than the alternative.
Massachusetts has something similar: the anti-snob zoning act. If less than 10% of housing is affordable, developers can override local zoning ordinances. There was a ballot ordinance to repeal it, which lost (I voted against it):

Suburban Brawl | Boston Magazine
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2014, 05:57 AM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,958,688 times
Reputation: 1953
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
So two cases in ONE state is "a lot of suburban municipalities around the country"? That's not the case in my suburban city, nor the suburban cities directly north, south, east or west of me! I've got you beat!
The Mt. Laurel cases affect the entire state - not just one municipality and have influenced planning and state court decisions around the country over the last 15 years.

You might want to read about them, dismissing them out of hand because you've never heard of them or because you happen to have apartments near your house is akin to saying that Euclid vs Ambler was irrelevant.

Also, it's not "difficult" per se to find the data but normally doing something like that would take a PhD student 2 years to do and they would be getting paid for it.

Last edited by nei; 04-22-2014 at 09:54 PM.. Reason: unnecessary
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2014, 10:54 AM
 
1,380 posts, read 1,889,751 times
Reputation: 2384
It's complicated. On paper, prices are super cheap. But we also have a lot of neighnorhoods that are so bad that nobody with the means to shop around would even consider. In a good area, a one bedroom apt will start about $700/mo and two bedrooms start about $900/mo. I'm sure that sounds cheap to folks on the coasts, but jobs don't pay much here. In many cases, especially in more working class areas, it's cheaper to buy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2014, 09:09 PM
 
2,388 posts, read 2,958,688 times
Reputation: 1953
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastmemphisguy View Post
I'm sure that sounds cheap to folks on the coasts, but jobs don't pay much here. In many cases, especially in more working class areas, it's cheaper to buy.
Good point about renting vs. buying.

It's all about the percentage of household income people are paying in rent/mortgage. But prices vary widely on the coasts as well, Philly vs NYC, Sacramento vs. San Francisco, Miami vs. Orlando, etc.

Anyway, it looks like Memphis is up at the top for affodability. I was reading in another article that ~85% of housing is priced below 30% of median income
Forbes names Memphis second most affordable city - Memphis Business Journal
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2014, 09:20 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,037,172 times
Reputation: 14811
I think Vancouver is the opposite: apartment rentals are relatively reasonable, but buying a house extremely expensive, especially compared to incomes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2014, 08:07 AM
 
56,744 posts, read 81,061,259 times
Reputation: 12549
Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
Good point about renting vs. buying.

It's all about the percentage of household income people are paying in rent/mortgage. But prices vary widely on the coasts as well, Philly vs NYC, Sacramento vs. San Francisco, Miami vs. Orlando, etc.

Anyway, it looks like Memphis is up at the top for affodability. I was reading in another article that ~85% of housing is priced below 30% of median income
Forbes names Memphis second most affordable city - Memphis Business Journal
Here's the Forbes article and it looks like the area I live in based on the criteria has the most affordable housing for major metro areas: America's Most Affordable Cities - Forbes
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-22-2014, 07:56 PM
 
12,309 posts, read 15,218,697 times
Reputation: 8117
Two points:
First of all, people have become so spooked from the housing collapse that they choose to rent to avoid a huge loss on their home.
Second, did anyone consider that places like Silicon Valley and Manhattan are so costly that people have to commute from over 50 miles away, and that is one reason we need good transit options? [The Altamont Commuter Express is a start, allowing commutes from nearly 90 miles, but with only four roundtrips a day, falls way short.]

Last edited by pvande55; 04-22-2014 at 07:57 PM.. Reason: edit distance
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2014, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,704 posts, read 4,676,952 times
Reputation: 3691
Quote:
Originally Posted by tpk-nyc View Post
Many cities and nearly all suburbs actively prevented developers from building apartments until recently. Most of it had to do with minimum parking requirements for new construction—even in walkable neighborhood with decent transit options.

Silicon Valley’s prices could be could be alleviated significantly but current residents want restrictive zoning laws and high prices. The problem is once you have high prices, current residents have a vested interest in keeping them that way.
I don't know if everyone wants prices to keep climbing higher- that situation is only good for those who are wanting to sell and make a big profit. For the majority of us, we groan at rising prices because it means higher property taxes, and of course higher costs in trying to buy into the housing market or upgrade to a nicer/newer/bigger house. People however don't want property values to go DOWN, of course, but I think most want stability, in whatever price range neighborhood they bought into.

Last edited by jm31828; 04-24-2014 at 12:36 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-24-2014, 07:13 PM
 
12,309 posts, read 15,218,697 times
Reputation: 8117
^ ^ ^ ^ ^
Except it isn't hard to find slum neighborhoods that in yesteryear were very exclusive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top