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Old 04-24-2014, 05:51 AM
 
56,565 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
I agree that Denver isn't small but having lived in the Triangle (and it's certainly grown since then) I wouldn't call Raleigh a big city. Wake County is pushing 1 million people but it's mostly sprawl and not the dense, SoCal version either. It's a large-ish metro but Chapel Hill is still pretty far from Raleigh. Carrboro is kinda hip but that's a small town in the metro. I wouldn't call Raleigh hip at all (but it's trying to be).

Asheville and Wilmington and even Durham probably have more pull in the "cool" department and none of those places are big cities.

Just saying that I don't think size matters when it comes to being "cool" It's about what's there. It might be a university, it might be some physical or cultural amenities. Asheville is cool because of its culture, because of the mountains, and because a lot of rich people invested heavily in the town 90 years ago.

The only thing stopping Erie from being more like Asheville is an institution or an industry that attracts young people/keeps young people from leaving. With the weather there, the proximity to expanding hops production in upstate NY, it's geographic location (between the Midwest, Northeast, Toronto/Hamiton/Windsor, etc) I could see it being a center of beer brewing and distribution. It could just as easily be the center of a large wine region. Alas, it isn't, but it could be and that's the sort of thing that makes the difference between a stagnant town like Erie and a growing one like Asheville.
I totally agree that last portion and I think some smaller cities are looking to institutions that they have like colleges to attract and/or to retain young people. It could be a matter of an industry and even location. I think that is why Ithaca is popular up here due to 3 colleges(especially Cornell), its location in the Finger Lakes, its funky vibe and dense built environment(which is becoming even more dense).

Also, certain parts of these cities may get discovered and have the aspects young people want, even if the reality or perception of the city as a whole is different. So, it may be a matter of discovery in terms of what smaller cities offer at least a slice of what you are looking for. Albany's Center Square neighborhood with its very urban fabric comes to mind, as does Old Town in Lansing MI.
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Old 04-24-2014, 06:22 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drive carephilly View Post
Once you hit 5 or 6 million, especially with rapid growth, it's just crowded, congested and expensive and you get people who have lived there most of their lives looking for a lower cost location that reminds them of what life used to be like in their town before the traffic got so bad.
I think that describes eastern Massachusetts perfectly.
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Old 04-24-2014, 09:00 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I totally agree that last portion and I think some smaller cities are looking to institutions that they have like colleges to attract and/or to retain young people. It could be a matter of an industry and even location. I think that is why Ithaca is popular up here due to 3 colleges(especially Cornell), its location in the Finger Lakes, its funky vibe and dense built environment(which is becoming even more dense).

Also, certain parts of these cities may get discovered and have the aspects young people want, even if the reality or perception of the city as a whole is different. So, it may be a matter of discovery in terms of what smaller cities offer at least a slice of what you are looking for. Albany's Center Square neighborhood with its very urban fabric comes to mind, as does Old Town in Lansing MI.
Here are streetviews of both of those areas: https://maps.google.com/maps?q=old+t...000002,,0,-2.5

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=cente...70000000000001
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Old 04-24-2014, 09:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
I'm not sure how the rest of the post connects to this. I'm not sure if smaller cities are growing faster than larger metros, perhaps someone could show some data?
No, because we're being asked to predict the future here, not indicate trends. And it is not necessary for smaller cities to grow faster than large metros--I didn't claim they had. I don't have any data on what will happen in the future--if I did, I could make a real killing in the stock market!

To me it seems obvious and is implied by the OP. A "successful" metro area is one that grows--those that don't grow, or shrink, are described as stagnant or collapsing. So it is inevitable that successful small cities are the ones that are in the process of turning into big cities, either that or we'll have to redefine what we consider small cities--which some might describe as "moving the goalposts."
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Old 04-25-2014, 07:56 AM
 
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I think that a small city with a major corporation may be a type of small city that could see growth. One like this comes to mind: City of Corning*

Corning Incorporated | Home

Home : Corning's Gaffer District
American Planning Association Designates Corning's Market Street a Top 10 Great Street for 2013 : Corning's Gaffer District

Corning Museum of Glass
Home Rockwell Museum - Native American Art, American Association of Museums, Remingtons West, Bob and Hertha Rockwell, Rockwell Museum, National Geographic, Old City Hall, Western Art, Rockwell Museum

Home | osfl

http://goo.gl/maps/MWEjO
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Old 04-25-2014, 12:05 PM
 
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just looking at the retirement forum here gives a idea with the common looking for small town place to retire posts. Boomers consist of 26% of population and just getting started. With them goes money and shift in services needed to serve them. They will do for retirement areas what they did for cities and then burbs as time goes on.
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Old 04-25-2014, 03:41 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texdav View Post
just looking at the retirement forum here gives a idea with the common looking for small town place to retire posts. Boomers consist of 26% of population and just getting started. With them goes money and shift in services needed to serve them. They will do for retirement areas what they did for cities and then burbs as time goes on.
Even a small city like Ithaca NY is kind of planning to provide such services for that population too: Kendal of Ithaca Plans $39 Mil Expansion - Ithaca Times : News

Here's more from Ithaca: http://www.ithacajournal.com/article...nclick_check=1
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Old 04-26-2014, 06:15 PM
 
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Here is another small city with current and future urban residential/mixed-use projects: Properties | R&M Real Estate Group
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Old 07-02-2014, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Jewel Lake (Sagle) Idaho
27,507 posts, read 17,624,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It is apparently hard for smaller cities to fund such amenities as museums, performing arts centers, large research libraries, etc, as few of them do. College towns sometimes have some of the above, but usually not on the level found in a large city. Also, few have ML sports teams unless they are suburbs of a close-in larger city, e.g. the Colorado Rapids stadium is in Commerce City, which is suburban Denver. These are the kinds of amenities that many want in their city. College teams are not quite the same, though some prefer them.
Honestly though, how big a draw are things like museums and art centers? They sound nice, but in practice, I don't see them as places to go every week or two-more like once a year or two as a vacation or special event. As far as sports...to each his own, but I don't waste my time (or money) watching adults play children's games. I tend to be much more into doing or participating in something, than watching. Hiking, motorcycling (especially backcountry), canoeing, hunting/fishing, camping for example. All things that aren't exactly supported by major metro areas. Not a critizism, just a different lifestyle. I suspect urban areas are more for "watchers" than participators. Even in housing, (I assume) you have far more people in appartments, that depend on professionals to do even basic home repair or remodeling, as opposed to people that build/remodel/maintain their own houses.
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Old 07-09-2014, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
We are seeing that happen now, there aren't that many big cities in the US, most are medium and small cities. We are seeing those cities competing with each other to become hot spot cities and towns to attract new people to them.

I think it is really important for our country to have lots of healthy medium and small cities throughout the country, not every city needs to be a NYC. Personally I think our country only needs one of those.
I wouldn't say we need only one big city, but I support the idea that, while urbanization is important to maintaining a more environmentally friendly way of living that suburbia, medium and small cities should be emphasized, rather than just sticking megacities everywhere.
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