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Old 05-01-2014, 07:54 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059

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^^Hell, yes! In my neighborhood, no matter when one goes out for a walk, there are others out walking; walking their dogs, walking their kids in a stroller, or just walking themselves. It's a great way to catch up with the neighbors.
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Old 05-01-2014, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,371 posts, read 59,817,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It's a great way to catch up with the neighbors.
People talk to their neighbors???

In the suburbs?????

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Old 05-01-2014, 09:21 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,265,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post

You need to be specific about what kind of suburb you're vilifying at the moment,
I'm not villifying anything. Just making observations.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
because people can and do walk in my suburb, and in every other suburb I've ever lived in, and they can and do walk around in the residential neighborhoods.
True. You may see the odd person out walking their dog or something but generally people don't walk much if at all in residential areas. On certain days such as the 4th of July half the neighborhood might even be outside enjoying the fireworks and celebrate the holiday but those are exceptions. The rule being, people don't walk much if at all in these areas.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
If I'm to walk to the produce market a few blocks away, for instance - or to the diner or the donut place or the barbecue restaurant or the convenience store or my dentist or the dry cleaners or the grocery store or the zoo or the state driver's license place or the beauty parlor or the guy who fixes my computer or the thrift shop or the liquor store or the butcher shop - how the hell do I get there if I don't walk through the residential neighborhood first?
You don't (walk). You drive.

Because in heavily zoned areas things are spread out too far apart to comfortably walk, with few exceptions.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,509,053 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
If I'm to walk to the produce market a few blocks away, for instance - or to the diner or the donut place or the barbecue restaurant or the convenience store or my dentist or the dry cleaners or the grocery store or the zoo or the state driver's license place or the beauty parlor or the guy who fixes my computer or the thrift shop or the liquor store or the butcher shop - how the hell do I get there if I don't walk through the residential neighborhood first?
Sounds like you live in a walkable neighborhood, unlike the suburban neighborhoods built in the 70s, 80s, 90s, and 00s where you can walk in the neighborhood all you want, but zoning is so segregated that it makes it near impossible to walk to anything else other than residential places in a convenient manner.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,371 posts, read 59,817,368 times
Reputation: 54016
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
I'm not villifying anything. Just making observations.
You need to get out more if you've observed no one walking in a suburb.

Quote:
True. You may see the odd person
Nothing odd about them. In my neighborhood, it's rare to see no one on the sidewalks during the day.

Quote:
You don't (walk). You drive.
No. You walk when all those things I mentioned are within five or six blocks of your house. Even if you're walking through five or six residential blocks to get there.

Quote:
Because in heavily zoned areas things are spread out too far apart to comfortably walk, with few exceptions.
Again, you need to get out more. Not all suburbs are "spread out". All those places I mentioned are clustered within two or three blocks of one another, and four or five blocks from my house.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Sounds like you live in a walkable neighborhood, unlike the suburban neighborhoods built in the 70s, 80s, 90s, and 00s where you can walk in the neighborhood all you want, but zoning is so segregated that it makes it near impossible to walk to anything else other than residential places in a convenient manner.
That's why I'm saying - and what some people refuse to believe - that not all suburbs are alike. Not even those built after 1970. Not every suburban neighborhood is a cul-de-sac built in a disconnected cornfield attached only to a busy six-lane street.

With no sidewalks.

Generalizations about suburbs - or about anything, really - make for a poor argument.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,509,053 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
That's why I'm saying - and what some people refuse to believe - that not all suburbs are alike. Not even those built after 1970. Not every suburban neighborhood is a cul-de-sac built in a disconnected cornfield attached only to a busy six-lane street.

With no sidewalks.

Generalizations about suburbs - or about anything, really - make for a poor argument.
Of course not all suburbs are alike, but the majority of them in this country are cul-de-sac suburbs that have poor walking connections, with large roads surrounding each suburban neighborhood, and zoning extremely segregated. You can find this type of suburban area in just about any city in this country.

Sure you can find suburban neigborhoods that have easy access to nearby commercial that makes it easy for one to walk to, but those are not common neighborhoods in the suburbs, but they should be.
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Old 05-01-2014, 09:58 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
You need to get out more if you've observed no one walking in a suburb.

Nothing odd about them. In my neighborhood, it's rare to see no one on the sidewalks during the day.
If you live in the area I think you do, you're living in an area built mostly before cars were common with densities that among the highest urban neighborhood densities in Ohio (but definitely not eastern Pennsylvania). I don't want to get into a city/suburb definition debate, but where you live has little in common with most newer suburbs
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Old 05-01-2014, 10:31 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
If you live in the area I think you do, you're living in an area built mostly before cars were common with densities that among the highest urban neighborhood densities in Ohio (but definitely not eastern Pennsylvania). I don't want to get into a city/suburb definition debate, but where you live has little in common with most newer suburbs
"most newer suburbs"? Do you really think that "most newer suburbs" across the country are alike? Here in the Wild West, "most newer suburbs", meaning built since about 1960 onward, have housing built on small lots, well under 1/4 acre, multi-family housing, sidewalks, parks and open space, and believe it or not, people do not have to drive 10 miles to go to the grocery store. A grocery is usually on of the first businesses to move in to a new development.
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Old 05-02-2014, 06:20 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
"most newer suburbs"? Do you really think that "most newer suburbs" across the country are alike? Here in the Wild West, "most newer suburbs", meaning built since about 1960 onward, have housing built on small lots, well under 1/4 acre, multi-family housing, sidewalks, parks and open space, and believe it or not, people do not have to drive 10 miles to go to the grocery store. A grocery is usually on of the first businesses to move in to a new development.
Most newer suburbs do not have most people living within 1/2 mile of a business district, nor census tract densities above 10k/sq mile (or higher with a couple of 15k/sq mile). This town I'm describing is not composed mostly of detached houses. Umm, few suburbs anywhere have people living 10 miles from a grocery store. Perhaps there are newer suburbs similar to the place I think OhioGirl81 is describing. I doubt there more than a few. Anything like this:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Malde...,138.4,,0,1.54

Last edited by nei; 05-02-2014 at 06:28 AM..
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Old 05-02-2014, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,509,053 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
"most newer suburbs"? Do you really think that "most newer suburbs" across the country are alike? Here in the Wild West, "most newer suburbs", meaning built since about 1960 onward, have housing built on small lots, well under 1/4 acre, multi-family housing, sidewalks, parks and open space, and believe it or not, people do not have to drive 10 miles to go to the grocery store. A grocery is usually on of the first businesses to move in to a new development.
I wish suburbs from 1960 to today were built like this, there wouldn't be an issue if this were the case, but I have been in too many suburbs across this country which suggests they have not been built like how you are suggesting.

In the past decade there has been changes to the types of suburban development options as more people prefer neighborhoods with things within walking distances.
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