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Old 05-03-2014, 05:22 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,013 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33082

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Walkable suburbs, Denver area:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/La...2b81cc!6m1!1e1
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.9768...p68uRlmNIA!2e0
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Hi...c96181861a6040
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7562...JTXg5rGZdA!2e0
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Li...08509a!6m1!1e1 (Light rail station)
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ar...456408!6m1!1e1
Less traditional but still walkable:
https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7402...vzXGdHdqQQ!2e0
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ed...1cd902!6m1!1e1
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Wa...3278ba!6m1!1e1
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Old 05-03-2014, 06:08 PM
 
56,655 posts, read 80,952,685 times
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While I agree that all have a degree of walkability in terms of infrastructure, I like Golden, Louisville and Edgewater as the top 3 and in that order.
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Old 05-03-2014, 07:25 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,013 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33082
^^Good choices!
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Old 05-03-2014, 08:34 PM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,860,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Might also be a matter of perspective. My aunt, who lives in a not particularly walkable area of London (walk score is 50, for what it's worth) found one of the first things noteworthy about her brother's neighborhood in suburban Chicago (either Schaumberg or Hoffman Estates, can't remember where he was at the time) was that very few people walk in the neighborhood. Houses might be odd, but the streets felt kinda dead.
Schaumburg and Hoffman Estates are in the category far burbs from Chicago and are not built for much walking outside of an few subdivisions.

IMHO walk scores are over rated. What matters first and foremost is that there it is safe to walk in the area. My area has an walk score of 51.It is pretty flawed imho.

It does not list all the restaurants nor does it list all the grocery stores in my area.

It thinks that being able to walk to coffee is something important but does not have an category for being able to walk to an laundry or an dry cleaner(which in this city can be important because older apartments lack in unit laundry).

It does list pharmacies as an walk able category but does not consider them as an place where you might do some shopping(an Walgreen or CVS).

It doesn't list banks or currency exchanges.

It does not break up the type of shopping into useful categories. For instance this area lacks pet stores(if you were looking for that you could be mislead).

It lumps all kinds of bars together and put the least walk able one(a recently closed strip bar!! That isn't even near housing or easy walk.) in the same category as an small neighborhood joint.

Last edited by chirack; 05-03-2014 at 08:50 PM..
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Old 05-03-2014, 08:39 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,533,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Not sure what suburbs you have seen, but if you're basing from where you grew up (Virginia Beach), you're going by the country which has the least pedestrian friendly suburbs in the country. Other parts of the country have their share of pedestrian-hostile suburbs, but there's often a mix. Still, I think a common situation is a long walk to some stores, which are on roads with infrequent crosswalks. Not a situation which gets lots of pedestrians. The streetcar-era suburbs varied, streetcar suburbs of Philadelphia were much denser than many cities in the interior of the country.

As for Portland's Hawthrone District, by built density and general form it didn't seem drastically from parts of Long Island, it didn't feel like a large contrast to what I would think of as "suburbia". The more walkable parts of Long Island are similar in density to Portland outside downtown, roughly the density where you could support most people living within 1/2 mile of a business district:

What makes a place or space walkable?

But the Long Island spot isn't very cutsey, just a bunch of stores pressed against a busy road:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=resta...,97.04,,0,2.19

Hawthorne looks much cuter in its busier sections:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=South...274.57,,0,0.09

and more like a town center. The shop density gets lower going east, looks like a mix of shops and residences. I could find Long Island areas that more of a main street feel, too, though most don't live near those. Of course, the types of businesses and the general culture between the two are rather different.
A good portion of my suburb experiences comes from the Mid-Atlantic, the South East, the Midwest, and the West Coast. The North East tends to have a mixed bag of examples.
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Old 05-03-2014, 08:48 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,989,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
A good portion of my suburb experiences comes from the Mid-Atlantic, the South East, the Midwest, and the West Coast. The North East tends to have a mixed bag of examples.
What do you mean by Mid-Atlantic?
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Old 05-03-2014, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,681,041 times
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I am back in the south this weekend near my old stomping grounds. Oddly many of the main streets now have sidewalks. But the weird thing was, there were signs for pedestrian crossing. But no crosswalks. On 45 mph roads. Other places just weren't really people scaled but had sidewalks. But I was really shocked when we went through a small town, that I hadn't spent much time in. But they had these amazingly visible sidewalks. They were red brick. I was impressed. Anyway this town has about 3-4 blocks of walkable main street and the rest isn't.

Anyway it was weird. Like sidewalks to nowhere.
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Old 05-03-2014, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,533,646 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
What do you mean by Mid-Atlantic?
Mid-Atlantic states - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 05-04-2014, 12:02 AM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
4,711 posts, read 2,549,517 times
Reputation: 9157
Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
There seem to be conflicting ideas on "walkability." For some it means sidewalks and crosswalks. For others it means destinations are in a short distance. For others it is based on street design.

So in your eyes, how would you define walkable?
Moving sidewalks. Like in an airport.
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Old 05-04-2014, 04:26 AM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,478 posts, read 5,148,540 times
Reputation: 3548
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Saint Clair is gone now. Braddock is so depopulated/demolished that it's a relatively safe place now. Hasn't been a murder in ten years or so, IIRC.
Thanks for the link. I just watched the Documentary Ready to Work: Portraits of Braddock – IFC. Very interesting rebirth story. Hopefully businesses can see the opportunities for rebirth as well.
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