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Old 10-01-2014, 07:07 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,519,126 times
Reputation: 7830

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Spoken like someone with too much time on his hands! Some of us don't have time to pop over to the store, bank, pet food place, etc 5 times a week or more.
You could if these things were just 5-10 minutes from your house on foot. I rode my bike to the bank yesterday and it took me less time to make it there and back than it would in a car.
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Old 10-01-2014, 07:19 AM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,194,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Because it isn't about making you do that. It's about having the option to do that, for people who don't have cars, or even those who do have cars but don't want to use them for every errand, or feel that burning gas for a trip of a few blocks isn't justifiable.

The question here is, what makes a place walkable? It has a lot more to do with the ability to complete the tasks of everyday life, like getting to work or getting groceries, than lattes or craft beer. It doesn't mean you can't drive, just that it isn't the only feasible option.

Exactly, it is about having options. I can take care of most of my needs within a mile.
All of it a very pleasant walk. I enjoy running these errands.
But if I'm in a hurry, its raining or I need something heavy, I drive. It is all about options.

Recently spent a few days at my sister's house in a nice Midwest suburb.
I was amazed how many times a day the neighbors' garage doors would go up, a car pull out and half hour later return.
Every single errand in that neighborhood required a car.
I would hate living with that few of options!
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Old 10-01-2014, 07:22 AM
 
1,998 posts, read 2,932,660 times
Reputation: 2150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Spoken like someone with too much time on his hands! Some of us don't have time to pop over to the store, bank, pet food place, etc 5 times a week or more.
Who are you to say what is "too much time" for another person? It's up to the individual to decide what is a good use of his or her time, not you.

Yes, there is no doubt in my mind that driving to the grocery store and loading up for a full week or month usually saves time versus walking to the grocery store and buying only what you can carry. But for some people it is worth the extra time if it means walking more and not having to own a car. For many other people it might not be worth that tradeoff, which is fine. I don't think anyone in this thread is saying that walking to the store is "better" than driving to the store. It's a matter of preference.

Also, let's not act like these things are mutually exclusive. I live in a very dense walkable neighborhood where many people don't have a car and walk to everything or take the Metro. But plenty of people still have cars and drive to the grocery store once a week, myself included.
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Old 10-01-2014, 07:47 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,999 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Exactly, it is about having options. I can take care of most of my needs within a mile.
All of it a very pleasant walk. I enjoy running these errands.
But if I'm in a hurry, its raining or I need something heavy, I drive. It is all about options.

Recently spent a few days at my sister's house in a nice Midwest suburb.
I was amazed how many times a day the neighbors' garage doors would go up, a car pull out and half hour later return.
Every single errand in that neighborhood required a car.
I would hate living with that few of options!
How many people live there? How many kids do the neighbors have? What kind of activities do they do? And you do know that some people are just like that. I like to combine trips, but I know people who will go out just to put gas in the car.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stateofnature View Post
Who are you to say what is "too much time" for another person? It's up to the individual to decide what is a good use of his or her time, not you.

Yes, there is no doubt in my mind that driving to the grocery store and loading up for a full week or month usually saves time versus walking to the grocery store and buying only what you can carry. But for some people it is worth the extra time if it means walking more and not having to own a car. For many other people it might not be worth that tradeoff, which is fine. I don't think anyone in this thread is saying that walking to the store is "better" than driving to the store. It's a matter of preference.

Also, let's not act like these things are mutually exclusive. I live in a very dense walkable neighborhood where many people don't have a car and walk to everything or take the Metro. But plenty of people still have cars and drive to the grocery store once a week, myself included.
Well, give me 40 lashes with a wet noodle for saying that! Here we go again on the wordsmithing!

This forum is full of young single males who do NOT have much demand on their time. So it's not a waste of time to them to go to the grocery store every day. I would rather spend my time doing something other than grocery shopping. Thank you for your attention.
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Old 10-01-2014, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,519,126 times
Reputation: 7830
It is all about options, when communities are made to be walkable then that means people can use several forms of transportation to get what they need, like walking, biking, and yes you guessed it even driving.
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Old 10-01-2014, 07:58 AM
 
1,998 posts, read 2,932,660 times
Reputation: 2150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
How many people live there? How many kids do the neighbors have? What kind of activities do they do? And you do know that some people are just like that. I like to combine trips, but I know people who will go out just to put gas in the car.



Well, give me 40 lashes with a wet noodle for saying that! Here we go again on the wordsmithing!

This forum is full of young single males who do NOT have much demand on their time. So it's not a waste of time to them to go to the grocery store every day. I would rather spend my time doing something other than grocery shopping. Thank you for your attention.
Young single males aren't the only ones with free time. Most Americans spend several hours a day watching TV. Most of those people are not young single males.
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Old 10-01-2014, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,419 posts, read 11,923,391 times
Reputation: 10536
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Because it isn't about making you do that. It's about having the option to do that, for people who don't have cars, or even those who do have cars but don't want to use them for every errand, or feel that burning gas for a trip of a few blocks isn't justifiable.

The question here is, what makes a place walkable? It has a lot more to do with the ability to complete the tasks of everyday life, like getting to work or getting groceries, than lattes or craft beer. It doesn't mean you can't drive, just that it isn't the only feasible option.
I'm not sure I'd even say that, because I think a walkable business district, by nature, needs to make it somewhat of a PITA to drive to, or rather to park.

Studies have shown that if you need to walk more than 5-10 minutes to get to a business district, you're liable to drive instead, provided it's not a hassle. Providing ample parking makes it less of a hassle. Being pretty sure that you won't be able to find an available space near the place of business makes you more more likely to walk.

This is before even considering the damage that parking can do to the walking experience. If placed in front of a building, or to the side, it breaks up the street wall and makes the pedestrian experience less fun. Even if placed behind, it creates a "parking moat" which ensures that there will be no residences immediately behind retail, reducing substantially the number of people who live within the most convenient walking distance.

Last edited by eschaton; 10-01-2014 at 08:32 AM..
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Old 10-01-2014, 08:21 AM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,858,676 times
Reputation: 1439
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
You could if these things were just 5-10 minutes from your house on foot. I rode my bike to the bank yesterday and it took me less time to make it there and back than it would in a car.
That is IF you live close enough to an branch of an bank that you have an account in(which for various reasons you may have money in an different bank) and IF you feel safe enough to walk or bike away from the bank(I live close to one but the only way I would use the lobby after dark is with an bullet proof vest on and back up.)

Last edited by chirack; 10-01-2014 at 08:42 AM..
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Old 10-01-2014, 08:38 AM
 
2,941 posts, read 3,858,676 times
Reputation: 1439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

This forum is full of young single males who do NOT have much demand on their time. So it's not a waste of time to them to go to the grocery store every day. I would rather spend my time doing something other than grocery shopping. Thank you for your attention.
Yeah the single part makes an huge difference. Young kids say under 6-7 can't really keep up with an adult walking and the amount of food/clothes and other items goes up. There isn't the I need to get the kid to or from the baby sitter by X time nor are these guys blue collar factory workers who could wind up working overtime or odd hours when the bus isn't running or young women leaving said factory who need to catch a bus alone at 2 a.m. and walk five blocks in the dark home. It is also much easier not to buy in bulk when you don't need to, have 2-3 kids and bulk buying saves both time and money.
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Old 10-01-2014, 08:44 AM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,194,181 times
Reputation: 3351
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
This forum is full of young single males who do NOT have much demand on their time. So it's not a waste of time to them to go to the grocery store every day.
Well I'm not going to make any stupid assumptions about anyone's age, gender or time commitments, but I will note that having multiple transportation options is a plus for all ages, all genders and both very busy people and not so busy people.

I have noticed that many people who drive for all of their errands, tend to view errands as a chore or burden. But being able to do my errands or commute while getting in a good walk or bike ride makes them a pleasant part of my day. I love sunshine and fresh air and hate traffic lights and parking lots. YMMV
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