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Old 10-01-2014, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,580,362 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
Q: What makes a place walkable?
A: An urbanist.

The definition is wholly arbitrary and the subject of personal preferences - a subjective opinion of the observer. Each decides whether a place is "walkable" or not. Very, very few would be situated such that their daily needs could be attended to if they lived in an area they deemed "walkable". The term is not part of the daily vocabulary of the rest of the world.
That is incorrect and based on your definition, I can only assume you have only been in car dependent neighborhoods and haven't actually experienced a walkable neighborhood.
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:05 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,357,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That is incorrect and based on your definition, I can only assume you have only been in car dependent neighborhoods and haven't actually experienced a walkable neighborhood.
You can assume whatever you want but you haven't exactly provided any empirical evidence to counter. You in particular seem to have a conniption fit over parking lots and whiffy preferences for "urban fabric". If anything you are the epitome of the urbanist described. Go catch a ride on your expensive public transit in your apparently not-so-walkable environment.
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:15 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,038 posts, read 102,742,261 times
Reputation: 33084
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78;36712671[B
]Depends on who you bank with[/b], we have three accounts, two are at credit unions and one is at a chance bank so there is always a bank near us. Plus our primary credit union is a common one in town so it isn't hard to be near one. We are lucky enough to have two of our three banks in our neighborhood making it very easy for me to bike to the bank, run some errands, grab a cup of coffee, and pick up a few things we might need for dinner at the grocery store.

Though we go to the grocery store each week, sometimes I get a great idea for dinner and need to pick up some key things.

Again, it is not impossible to have a neighborhood that is walkable thag has all these things, and just because a neighborhood is walkable doesn't mean you can't drive to everything. If someone feels the need to drive three block down, park, then drive two blocks to the next thing, park, and then drive 5 blocks home, and park. I have no issue with that. What I do have an issue with are neighborhoods that are car dependent, where it is near impossible to do all those things without the use of a car. I am confused why anyone would have an issue with what I am saying a neighborhood should be like.
"Simple, elegant and wrong". That's how I feel about these glib answers to people's very real situations.
For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong. - H. L. Mencken at BrainyQuote

Maybe it's because you are so militant about how things "should" be.
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:18 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,038 posts, read 102,742,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Wburg's post said nothing about banning parking, and in many cities businesses are required to have parking whether the businesses wish to or not. One pharmacy near me doesn't have parking, it's in a town center district and easy to walk to and combine with other trips. It's the one I normally go to, and it's the most convenient one, especially before I had a car.

Denver is much less dense than some older cities, say Boston. Many, perhaps even most pharmacies in Boston do not have parking.
Nor did I accuse him of wanting to ban parking. Here's what he said, in part: "Making places somewhat of a PITA to park doesn't mean you can't drive there"

I will point out he lives in Sacramento, which is probably less dense (or no moreso) than Denver.
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:25 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,070,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Nor did I accuse him of wanting to ban parking. Here's what he said, in part: "Making places somewhat of a PITA to park doesn't mean you can't drive there"
ok, then I don't see how the banning parking comment followed

Quote:
I will point out he lives in Sacramento, which is probably less dense (or no moreso) than Denver.
I know but he lives in one of the most densest parts of the city (in or near downtown). Though I'm unfamiliar with either city.

Last edited by nei; 10-01-2014 at 05:45 PM..
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Old 10-01-2014, 05:38 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,271,652 times
Reputation: 2924
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
Q: What makes a place walkable?
A: An urbanist.

The definition is wholly arbitrary and the subject of personal preferences - a subjective opinion of the observer. Each decides whether a place is "walkable" or not. Very, very few would be situated such that their daily needs could be attended to if they lived in an area they deemed "walkable". The term is not part of the daily vocabulary of the rest of the world.

I think this urbanist defines it pretty well:
Walk Appeal | Steve Mouzon


And what is your idea of a walkable place? The shopping aisles at Walmart?
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Old 10-01-2014, 06:03 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,580,362 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
You can assume whatever you want but you haven't exactly provided any empirical evidence to counter. You in particular seem to have a conniption fit over parking lots and whiffy preferences for "urban fabric". If anything you are the epitome of the urbanist described. Go catch a ride on your expensive public transit in your apparently not-so-walkable environment.
What? My bike pays for itself every time I use it, so not sure why you would think it was "expensive public transit." Also, why do you have such a negative view towards a neighborhood that provides options so that people don't have to use cars if they don't want to?

It sounds like you have a strong hatred towards anything that you might deem "urban" for no reason at all. I don't really need to counter anything you have said seeing it is inaccurate to begin with.
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Old 10-01-2014, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,580,362 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
"Simple, elegant and wrong". That's how I feel about these glib answers to people's very real situations.
For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong. - H. L. Mencken at BrainyQuote

Maybe it's because you are so militant about how things "should" be.
Militant?? Last time I checked, providing "options" isn't something that one would call "militant." To me, a militant point of view would be neighborhoods need to be car dependent ONLY.

Care to tell me what is wrong with a walkable community? You can still drive in a walkable community, so it fulfills the needs you have in a car dependent community.
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Old 10-01-2014, 06:07 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,070,148 times
Reputation: 14811
Again, please stay on the thread topic.
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Old 10-01-2014, 06:24 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,038 posts, read 102,742,261 times
Reputation: 33084
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
ok, then I don't see how the banning parking comment followed



I know but he lives in one of the most densest parts of the city (in or near downtown). Though I'm unfamiliar with either city.
I. did. not. use. the word. "ban". Please check my previous posts.
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