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Old 10-06-2014, 04:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
There are lots of neighborhoods where one could live car free in Chicago and not be just going to the Loop.

I am not saying anything about communities being car free, I am saying there needs to be options and only walkable neighborhoods provide those options. If you want to drive everywhere in a walkable community you can.
Oh, you could live car free and you could also live without electricity both are pains in the neck in many places. An good example would have been an person who was hired to take care of an relative. It took her close to an hour to do what I could do in my car in under 30 mins.
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Old 10-06-2014, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Oh, you could live car free and you could also live without electricity both are pains in the neck in many places. An good example would have been an person who was hired to take care of an relative. It took her close to an hour to do what I could do in my car in under 30 mins.
That might be a pain in the neck to you, but that doesn't mean everyone needs to be car dependent.

And? What does it matter to you if you could do a commute in half the time as someone else? Did you offer to buy that person a car? Did it somehow affect their ability to show up for work?

Currently I am enjoying being car free, biking where I need to go, and living in a walkable community. Your preference and my preference are completely different, but the common ground is that you are able to be car dependent in my community, but I am not able to be car free in a car dependent community.

It is all about providing options, car dependent communities do not provide options.
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Old 10-06-2014, 04:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
That might be a pain in the neck to you, but that doesn't mean everyone needs to be car dependent.

And? What does it matter to you if you could do a commute in half the time as someone else? Did you offer to buy that person a car? Did it somehow affect their ability to show up for work?

Currently I am enjoying being car free, biking where I need to go, and living in a walkable community. Your preference and my preference are completely different, but the common ground is that you are able to be car dependent in my community, but I am not able to be car free in a car dependent community.

It is all about providing options, car dependent communities do not provide options.
It affected there ability to care for their own ailing parent because trips to do everything took longer. She was limited in selection as to where and how much she could shop which ain't fun when low income. Oh she also was limited as to where she could place her mother, due to transit.

I did tend to drive her home so she didn't have to ride transit at night because I was being nice and the area I am in isn't that safe. It was an pain in the neck for her to head downtown because the EL system stops at 95th street so it was an long bus ride to the train to the station to pick up her check(which her employer refused to mail). It limited where and when she could work due to needing transit. True it was better than having no transit at all but she got an car as soon as possible(then lost it).
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Old 10-06-2014, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
It affected there ability to care for their own ailing parent because trips to do everything took longer. She was limited in selection as to where and how much she could shop which ain't fun when low income. Oh she also was limited as to where she could place her mother, due to transit.

I did tend to drive her home so she didn't have to ride transit at night because I was being nice and the area I am in isn't that safe. It was an pain in the neck for her to head downtown because the EL system stops at 95th street so it was an long bus ride to the train to the station to pick up her check(which her employer refused to mail). It limited where and when she could work due to needing transit. True it was better than having no transit at all but she got an car as soon as possible(then lost it).
Being low income means she probably couldn't afford a car. It also sounds like where you were might have had poor transit. But you scenario brings up the importance of a walkable community, by providing options, it is easy for those that cannot afford a car to get around. In a car dependent community, someone who is low income has to buy a car that they cannot afford or has to reply on poor slow service from transit.
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Old 10-06-2014, 04:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Being low income means she probably couldn't afford a car. It also sounds like where you were might have had poor transit. But you scenario brings up the importance of a walkable community, by providing options, it is easy for those that cannot afford a car to get around. In a car dependent community, someone who is low income has to buy a car that they cannot afford or has to reply on poor slow service from transit.
Transit is always slow service even if the buses are 15 mins. apart there is no waiting when it comes to having your own car.
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Old 10-06-2014, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
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There is also the factor of the individual's disposition towards walking. Some people just hate walking to destinations. They may have some excuse for not walking (e.g. bad knee), but often they are perfectly healthy. They just don't like to be seen on two feet going to a nearby destination. I could name a hundred examples: the guys who would literally drive across the street to cash their checks, the neighbor who drives in the wrong lane to visit her grown son or daughter one driveway down, the college athlete who drives from their on-campus housing to the parking lot nearest their class, etc. It's sort of like drivers who unnecessarily have the A/C on despite driving at 30 mph on a perfectly pleasant day.
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Old 10-06-2014, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Originally Posted by chirack View Post
Transit is always slow service even if the buses are 15 mins. apart there is no waiting when it comes to having your own car.
There is such a thing as finding parking and traffic. The more cars on the road, the more traffic. The more options that is provided to people, the less amount of cars on the road, and the less amount of traffic. It is a very simple concept.
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Old 10-06-2014, 05:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
There is such a thing as finding parking and traffic. The more cars on the road, the more traffic. The more options that is provided to people, the less amount of cars on the road, and the less amount of traffic. It is a very simple concept.
True, but traffic has never gotten so bad that the car can't beat the bus and the only time the EL will get you there faster is during the height of rush(otherwise it is slower). Parking is pretty easy in most areas of town esp. areas that have parking lots that are in use and don't have mega amounts of density.
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Old 10-06-2014, 05:47 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
True, but traffic has never gotten so bad that the car can't beat the bus and the only time the EL will get you there faster is during the height of rush(otherwise it is slower). Parking is pretty easy in most areas of town esp. areas that have parking lots that are in use and don't have mega amounts of density.
Only way a bus can beat a car is if there's separated bus lanes, excluding parking. For Brooklyn (maybe even Boston in some parts), the subway is usually faster than driving even without rush hour, but only if you're on a direct subway connection, if not it'll be slower. Once you go far enough, driving will be faster than the bus even with parking. I agree driving is usually faster.

But I'd rather live in a place where it's practical to be able to walk to things in a short distance, there are other people walking. Whether driving is faster than transit doesn't have any effect on that.
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Old 10-06-2014, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
True, but traffic has never gotten so bad that the car can't beat the bus and the only time the EL will get you there faster is during the height of rush(otherwise it is slower). Parking is pretty easy in most areas of town esp. areas that have parking lots that are in use and don't have mega amounts of density.
The EL unfortunately isn't as good as it should be for a city the size of Chicago. It should be about twice the size as it is now. Though whenever I visit Chicago, I have no problem getting around in many of the neighborhoods because the city is a very walkable city. This again is what I am talking about when it comes to providing options.

Car dependent communities do not provide options.
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