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Old 10-07-2014, 12:18 AM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,351,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Actually it is important to be concerned about your health. Are you one of those who has no interest in your own physical health?
There is a difference between one's concern for one's own health as opposed to a feigned concern for the health of others as a pretext.

Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
You know belly fat is some of the most dangerous fat to have.
Depends on what animal it comes from and your religion, doesn't it?
Pancetta and bacon both typically come from pig bellies.
I don't think many people view either as "dangerous" to have.
Your mileage may vary depending upon your ethnic/religious beliefs.

Last edited by IC_deLight; 10-07-2014 at 12:34 AM..
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Old 10-07-2014, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,528,523 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
There is a difference between one's concern for one's own health as opposed to a feigned concern for the health of others as a pretext.
Your assumption is inaccurate and still doesn't change the basic fact here, that providing options is a good thing.
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Old 10-07-2014, 12:30 AM
 
5 posts, read 4,687 times
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All the answers above are correct. I also think that it refers to the pleasures of walking in an area, such as a park where you are free to walk at your own speed, you may even stop to think....
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Old 10-07-2014, 06:34 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Yes, the highest rates of obesity are in the inner-cities. People do seem to not see that connection. Suburbanites have the best health of all the residential categories.
Obesity, physical activity, and the urban environment: public health research needs
**Persistent trends in overweight and obesity have resulted in a rapid research effort focused on built environment, physical activity, and overweight. Much of the focus of this research has been on the design and form of suburbs. It suggests that several features of the suburban built environment such as low densities, poor street connectivity and the lack of sidewalks are associated with decreased physical activity and an increased risk of being overweight. But compared to suburban residents, inner city populations have higher rates of obesity and inactivity despite living in neighborhoods that are dense, have excellent street connectivity and who's streets are almost universally lined with sidewalks.**
from your first link:

Studies on sprawl and public health have found that increased levels of sprawl are associated with increased obesity, decreased physical activity [7,8] and poorer health [9,10], including the risk of motor vehicle and pedestrian fatalities...Evidence is mounting that the design and form of many, if not most, U.S. suburbs contribute to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight among children and adults. Certain features of the built environment such as the presence of sidewalks, streetlights, interconnectivity of streets, population density and use mix appear to encourage physical activity and thus reduce the risk of obesity and related health problems.

These discussions on health and built form don't really go anywhere, I'm not sure why people bring them up. But while yes, inner cities often have worse health outcomes, you have to control from other factors (via multiple regression) to isolate the effect of built form.
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Old 10-07-2014, 07:14 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,011 posts, read 102,621,396 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rzzz View Post
Perhaps the environment Americans live in contributes to the fact that 65% of them are overweight or obese.
See post 485.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
from your first link:

Studies on sprawl and public health have found that increased levels of sprawl are associated with increased obesity, decreased physical activity [7,8] and poorer health [9,10], including the risk of motor vehicle and pedestrian fatalities...Evidence is mounting that the design and form of many, if not most, U.S. suburbs contribute to the growing prevalence of obesity and overweight among children and adults. Certain features of the built environment – such as the presence of sidewalks, streetlights, interconnectivity of streets, population density and use mix – appear to encourage physical activity and thus reduce the risk of obesity and related health problems.

These discussions on health and built form don't really go anywhere, I'm not sure why people bring them up. But while yes, inner cities often have worse health outcomes, you have to control from other factors (via multiple regression) to isolate the effect of built form.
I quoted from the abstract. You quoted from the study itself, and left off the "but". When you study suburbanites, that's what you find. If you compare them to inner-city residents, you find something different. The "mitigating" factors don't mitigate. Suburbs are bad, the inner city worse. But you're right, and people shouldn't bring up this stuff to begin with.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 10-07-2014 at 07:28 AM..
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Old 10-07-2014, 07:24 AM
 
1,971 posts, read 2,491,966 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
See post 485.



I quoted from the abstract. You quoted from the study itself, and left off the "but". When you study suburbanites, that's what you find. If you compare them to inner-city residents, you find something different. The "mitigating" factors don't mitigate. But you're right, and people shouldn't bring up this stuff to begin with.
You are simply wrong, if you had bothered to read the report you linked.
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Old 10-07-2014, 07:25 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,979,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I quoted from the abstract. You quoted from the study itself, and left off the "but".
I was picking part on purpose just to show there's also an other side within the same article.

Quote:
When you study suburbanites, that's what you find. If you compare them to inner-city residents, you find something different. The "mitigating" factors don't mitigate.
My point is, to find the effect of one factor, other factors (poverty, ethnicity) need to be removed for a valid comparison. Obviously, overall the other factors play a larger role.
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Old 10-08-2014, 05:36 PM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,266,947 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phyxius View Post
They can afford to go to gym if they choose to do so. Just because there isn't an convenience store at the corner or a outdoor cafe, it does not mean you are unable to walk there. I can't explain what goes through the head of people who cross six lanes of traffic mid-block but that doesn't mean it is not possible to walk in that environment.


- Gym exercise is an indoor activity, and people spend far too much time indoors as it is which I think is not healthy.
Gotta get out into the sunshine and fresh air!

- Much has been written about how people with gym memberships don't use it regularly, or end up quitting within months. I think the sterile indoor environment of a gym is a turnoff. And is not a solution for kids and teens who aren't old enough to drive themselves to the gym, or can't afford a car. So people will spend practically all their childhood inside the house playing video games, watching tv, on the computer, playing with their cellphones, etc. By the time they reach adulthood and get a car they have not developed the habits and discipline it takes to exercise or workout consistently. And getting a car makes you want to exercise even less when you can just drive everywhere.


Study - Gym memberships a waste for most
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Old 10-08-2014, 10:59 PM
 
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A local suburban apologist once tried to defend gym membership and the decision to pay to walk on treadmills instead of walking on sidewalks as part of everyday life as a matter of consumer choice, claiming that people weren't laboratory rats running around on wheels--although I can think of fewer mental images where people look more like lab rats on wheels than a row of people walking on treadmills.
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Old 10-09-2014, 12:47 AM
 
2,366 posts, read 2,128,687 times
Reputation: 1752
Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
- Gym exercise is an indoor activity, and people spend far too much time indoors as it is which I think is not healthy.
Gotta get out into the sunshine and fresh air!

- Much has been written about how people with gym memberships don't use it regularly, or end up quitting within months. I think the sterile indoor environment of a gym is a turnoff. And is not a solution for kids and teens who aren't old enough to drive themselves to the gym, or can't afford a car. So people will spend practically all their childhood inside the house playing video games, watching tv, on the computer, playing with their cellphones, etc. By the time they reach adulthood and get a car they have not developed the habits and discipline it takes to exercise or workout consistently. And getting a car makes you want to exercise even less when you can just drive everywhere.


Study - Gym memberships a waste for most
From your link

Quote:
It says most people lack the discipline to visit the gym often enough to justify their membership costs.
That is a personal problem and has nothing to do with the environment itself.

Just because a sidewalk or a paved path isn't available, it does not mean you are incapable of walking, exercising or biking. Every road isn't design like an interstate. If hot water isn't available, are you not going to shower? Some of you put "walkable" in the category of convenience and aesthetics. A walking environment does not encourage walking if the person choose not to do so. That has been my point the whole time. Anyone can make use of any environment however they see fit if they have the mindset to do so, something that was lacking from the people in that study.

If you want convenience, that's fine but some people don't need that. There is a connection from obesity to our environment but it has nothing to do this topic. Obesity was only brought up another poster as a guilt trip. Sorry, I'm not falling for it.

Go ahead and bring up the studies. They're only as good as the person who design them. All I got from that study is that because people underestimated their time, desire, and money. it's a waste. That does not convince me that the walking environment is better for exercising. If they don't make time to go to the gym, then they won't make time to go out and walk.
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