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Old 10-11-2014, 10:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Yes, if you're 80 and have arthritis it might be. I'm not 80.

The benefits of walking are not limited to a specific age group, nor is jogging.
I don't know where you get such nonsense.
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Old 10-12-2014, 12:06 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
This is a big misconception. Walking has countless health benefits that have been scientifically proven. It's probably the best form of exercise there is. And if you want to burn calories quicker then just walk faster or jog. Resistance training is for building muscle. It isn't required for good health, but walking is absolutely essential.


Walking Benefits - Dr. Oz & Dr. Roizen on Benefits of Walking - Walking - Sharecare

Walking: Trim your waistline, improve your health - Mayo Clinic

American Heart Association - The Benefits of Walking

8 Astonishing Benefits of Walking | Rodale News

Mental Benefits of Walking | Emotional Benefits of Exercise | Arthritis Today Magazine
Did you read these links?

First off, Dr. Oz is a quack, so I'm not bothering with his link.
The Mayo link recommends at least 30 minutes of physical activity per day. So walking 5 minutes to/from the bus stop is not likely to do much good, nor is sauntering along as it recommends the exercise be "moderate aerobic" in nature.
The American Heart Association says the same.
Rodale News is quackery as well.
The arthritis magazine touts the mental benefits of walking. While I agree, these benefits have nothing to do with physical health.
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Old 10-12-2014, 12:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post


Physical Activity for Everyone: Guidelines: Adults | DNPAO | CDC
150 minutes of moderate-intensity cardio AND two full-body resistance training workouts per week. We're not talking about bench pressing 300 lbs here like some gym rat. The CDC levels are extremely minimal.

Moderate-intensity cardio is defined as 50-70% of maximum heart heart. My maximum heart rate is 198 beats per minute, so I'd need at a minimum to get it up to 98 beats per minute. Just hopped on my treadmill that sits under my desk and cranked it up to 4 mph. Heart rate? 92. No dice, not getting any real exercise. Of course, if you're totally sedentary and even fatter than I am maybe you'd get your heart pumping.

Not saying it's not good. I use a treadmill desk and walk 4 hours a day way slower than that (try typing at 4 mph, can't do.) Way better than sitting those 4 hours a day, but it's not exercise. And if you're someone that actually exercises, you don't waste time at <70% of maximum heart rate very often. There's no results down there. Back when I used to do double centuries (~10 hours or more since there were usually done in mountainous areas), I'd spend 10-14 hours closer to 80% of maximum heart rate.

That's not what I am talking about. I'm talking about the extremely minimal levels the CDC recommends for general health.

Both are important for health, but as your link indicates you need a lot more cardio (walking, jogging, biking) than resistance training. But as another poster mentioned working out at the gym is exercise for the sake of exercise. In contrast living in a good walkable area allows you run errands and get other things done while exercising at the same time. If I wanted to just exercise to exercise I prefer to go on a walk with someone or walk my dog because these are fun things to do. Swimming, playing basketball, biking etc. these cardio activities are not only healthy but also fun to do. Plus being in the sunshine is good for your health. But working out at a gym is just work, not so fun.

Plus all the gyms I know of have an age restriction for liability reasons. You have to be older than 18 or 21, so your kids would be out of luck.
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Old 10-12-2014, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,509,053 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Did you read these links?

First off, Dr. Oz is a quack, so I'm not bothering with his link.
The Mayo link recommends at least 30 minutes of physical activity per day. So walking 5 minutes to/from the bus stop is not likely to do much good, nor is sauntering along as it recommends the exercise be "moderate aerobic" in nature.
The American Heart Association says the same.
Rodale News is quackery as well.
The arthritis magazine touts the mental benefits of walking. While I agree, these benefits have nothing to do with physical health.
In a walkable community it is easy to spend 30 minutes of your day walking to places. It still doesn't change the fact that there are health benefits to walking.
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Old 10-12-2014, 06:20 AM
 
4,023 posts, read 3,265,101 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

First off, Dr. Oz is a quack, so I'm not bothering with his link.
Wow. I didn't know quacks got to be cardiac surgeons at Columbia Univ. Medical Center.

What are your credentials? Do you have a credible source that disputes what he says?
He isn't saying anything about walking that is controversial or disputed in the medical community.
But only a true quack would deny that walking is very beneficial for your health.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
The Mayo link recommends at least 30 minutes of physical activity
per day. So walking 5 minutes to/from the bus stop is not likely to do much good, nor is
sauntering along as it recommends the exercise be "moderate aerobic" in nature.
The Mayo link doesn't say anything about 30 minutes, so you're just making that up.
Nor does it say anything about 'moderate aerobic' those are your words.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
The American Heart Association says the same.
Again, no. The AHA link doesn't say anything about 'moderate aerobic' or 'sauntering
along.' Those are your words. It doesn't say anything about walking speed, period.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

Did you read these links?
Apparently you did not.
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Old 10-12-2014, 08:38 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33058
^^The heck I didn't! Well, I didn't read Oz', and I didn't read Rodale's b/c I don't do quackery.

Here's some more info about Dr. Oz: Mehmet Oz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Popular Science[35] and The New Yorker[17] have expressed criticism of Oz for giving "non-scientific" advice. These criticisms include questioning if he is "doing more harm than good".[17] Prevention Magazine has given positive reviews of Dr. Oz[36] calling him "The country's most beloved MD".[37] The magazine also states that "Dr. Mehmet Oz, wants you to challenge your doctors, understand your body, and demand better care."[38] Oz writes health features and columns for Men's Health magazine.[39]

Dr. Oz has been "honored" by the James Randi Educational Foundation with their Pigasus Award, an award intended "to expose parapsychological, paranormal or psychic frauds that Randi has noted over the previous year."[40] The award consists of a silver flying pig and refers to claiming something so doubtful that it will only happen "when pigs fly." Dr. Oz has been given this award on three separate occasions, more than any other recipient:

First in 2009 for promotion of energy therapies such as Reiki.

Again in 2010 for support of faith healing and psychic communication with the dead, among other controversial practices. Oz became the first person to receive a Pigasus Award two years in a row.[41]

And again, in 2012, for "refusal to face reality" and for his continued promotion of quack medical practices, paranormal belief, and pseudoscience.[42]

Oz has also been supportive of homeopathy.[43]

As well, Oz's image and quotes have been used in many weight loss product scams. While he himself has not been found to be involved in these scams, critics claim that he frequently makes statements that can be exploited by scammers.[44]

Oz has countered that he is a proponent of alternative medicine and has stated that he makes great efforts to inform viewers that he neither sells nor endorses any supplements.[45] He also created the organization "OzWatch" as a way for viewers to report scams.[45] Ozwatch has received more than 35,000 complaints and has issued 600 cease and desist letters.[45]"


Oz may know cardiac surgery, but he's way exceeded his knowledge base. The article on walking, which I did look at, is fluff, and like a lot of Oz' claims, go "over the top", e.g. this: "2. Changes your RealAge -- pronto: As little as 90 days after starting a regular walking program, its age-reducing effects can be measured. Find out your RealAge now." and this: "Boosts your immune system: Walking regularly can lower your risk of arthritis, macular degeneration, and even cancer by an astonishing 50% compared with people who don't exercise."

The 'Dr. Oz Effect': Senators Scold Mehmet Oz For Diet Scams - NBC News
Can you trust Dr. Oz? His medical advice often conflicts with the best science.
America’s quack: Dr. Mehmet Oz – Respectful Insolence
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~policyla...tain-on-dr-oz/

Rodale Press is on the Quackwatch list.
Quackwatch
My professional nutrition colleagues say one of its prime magazines "Prevention" has 'a lot of misinformation', generally about the curing powers of certain foods and supplements.

Here is a direct quote from the Mayo article:
" For most healthy adults, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends at least two hours and 30 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or one hour and 15 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity — preferably spread throughout the week — and strength training exercises at least twice a week.

As a general goal, aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day. If you can't set aside that much time, try two 15-minute sessions or three 10-minute sessions throughout the day.
"

From the AHA article:
"Research has shown that the benefits of walking and moderate physical activity for at least 30 minutes a day can help you"

Clearly, if you're going to get all your exercise via walking, you have to do it at moderate intensity for at least 30 minutes. So a five minute stroll to the bus stop does not count.
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Old 10-12-2014, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,894 posts, read 7,655,626 times
Reputation: 4508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
^^The heck I didn't! Well, I didn't read Oz', and I didn't read Rodale's b/c I don't do quackery.

Here's some more info about Dr. Oz: Mehmet Oz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
"Popular Science[35] and The New Yorker[17] have expressed criticism of Oz for giving "non-scientific" advice. These criticisms include questioning if he is "doing more harm than good".[17] Prevention Magazine has given positive reviews of Dr. Oz[36] calling him "The country's most beloved MD".[37] The magazine also states that "Dr. Mehmet Oz, wants you to challenge your doctors, understand your body, and demand better care."[38] Oz writes health features and columns for Men's Health magazine.[39]

Dr. Oz has been "honored" by the James Randi Educational Foundation with their Pigasus Award, an award intended "to expose parapsychological, paranormal or psychic frauds that Randi has noted over the previous year."[40] The award consists of a silver flying pig and refers to claiming something so doubtful that it will only happen "when pigs fly." Dr. Oz has been given this award on three separate occasions, more than any other recipient:

First in 2009 for promotion of energy therapies such as Reiki.

Again in 2010 for support of faith healing and psychic communication with the dead, among other controversial practices. Oz became the first person to receive a Pigasus Award two years in a row.[41]

And again, in 2012, for "refusal to face reality" and for his continued promotion of quack medical practices, paranormal belief, and pseudoscience.[42]

Oz has also been supportive of homeopathy.[43]

As well, Oz's image and quotes have been used in many weight loss product scams. While he himself has not been found to be involved in these scams, critics claim that he frequently makes statements that can be exploited by scammers.[44]

Oz has countered that he is a proponent of alternative medicine and has stated that he makes great efforts to inform viewers that he neither sells nor endorses any supplements.[45] He also created the organization "OzWatch" as a way for viewers to report scams.[45] Ozwatch has received more than 35,000 complaints and has issued 600 cease and desist letters.[45]"


Oz may know cardiac surgery, but he's way exceeded his knowledge base. The article on walking, which I did look at, is fluff, and like a lot of Oz' claims, go "over the top", e.g. this: "2. Changes your RealAge -- pronto: As little as 90 days after starting a regular walking program, its age-reducing effects can be measured. Find out your RealAge now." and this: "Boosts your immune system: Walking regularly can lower your risk of arthritis, macular degeneration, and even cancer by an astonishing 50% compared with people who don't exercise."

The 'Dr. Oz Effect': Senators Scold Mehmet Oz For Diet Scams - NBC News
Can you trust Dr. Oz? His medical advice often conflicts with the best science.
America’s quack: Dr. Mehmet Oz – Respectful Insolence
Pulling back the curtain on Dr. Oz | policylab

Rodale Press is on the Quackwatch list.
Quackwatch
My professional nutrition colleagues say one of its prime magazines "Prevention" has 'a lot of misinformation', generally about the curing powers of certain foods and supplements.

Here is a direct quote from the Mayo article:
" For most healthy adults, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends at least two hours and 30 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or one hour and 15 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity — preferably spread throughout the week — and strength training exercises at least twice a week.

As a general goal, aim for at least 30 minutes of physical activity a day. If you can't set aside that much time, try two 15-minute sessions or three 10-minute sessions throughout the day.
"

From the AHA article:
"Research has shown that the benefits of walking and moderate physical activity for at least 30 minutes a day can help you"

Clearly, if you're going to get all your exercise via walking, you have to do it at moderate intensity for at least 30 minutes. So a five minute stroll to the bus stop does not count.
But, as has been pointed out already, one isn't just walking to the bus stop in a walkable neighborhood.
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Old 10-12-2014, 11:25 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33058
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
But, as has been pointed out already, one isn't just walking to the bus stop in a walkable neighborhood.
You don't know what/when/how much anyone is walking except yourself. The point is, for walking to count as exercise, per the Mayo Clinic and the AHA, one has to be walking at a moderate intensity and for 30 minutes a day (can be broken up into 2-3 sessions). Here are a couple definitions of "moderate intensity" from reliable (e.g. NOT Rodale Press or Dr. Oz) sources: http://exercise.about.com/od/getting...intensity.htm; What's moderate intensity exercise? - Wellness Center, U of I Note the U of I link says "brisk walking", e.g. the way you walk when you're about to miss the bus. It's not a saunter to the bus stop, a stroll to the bar/coffee shop, etc. And it has to add up to at least 30 minutes per day. Believe me, when you start to keep track of the time, it's harder to get there than you think. My friend and I walk about 30 minutes in the morning and we cover about 1 1/2 miles.

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 10-12-2014 at 12:15 PM..
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Old 10-12-2014, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,509,053 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You don't know what/when/how much anyone is walking except yourself. The point is, for walking to count as exercise, per the Mayo Clinic and the AHA, one has to be walking at a moderate intensity and for 30 minutes a day (can be broken up into 2-3 sessions). Here are a couple definitions of "moderate intensity" from reliable (e.g. NOT Rodale Press or Dr. Oz) sources: http://exercise.about.com/od/getting...intensity.htm; What's moderate intensity exercise? - Wellness Center, U of I Note the U of I link says "brisk walking", e.g. the way you walk when you're about to miss the bus. It's not a saunter to the bus stop, a stroll to the bar/coffee shop, etc. And it has to add up to at least 30 minutes per day. Believe me, when you start to keep track of the time, it's harder to get there than you think. My friend and I walk about 30 minutes in the morning and we cover about 1 1/2 miles.
This doesn't change the fact that walking is good for you and it is easier to do in a walkable community.
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Old 10-12-2014, 02:43 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You don't know what/when/how much anyone is walking except yourself. The point is, for walking to count as exercise, per the Mayo Clinic and the AHA, one has to be walking at a moderate intensity and for 30 minutes a day (can be broken up into 2-3 sessions). Here are a couple definitions of "moderate intensity" from reliable (e.g. NOT Rodale Press or Dr. Oz) sources: http://exercise.about.com/od/getting...intensity.htm; What's moderate intensity exercise? - Wellness Center, U of I Note the U of I link says "brisk walking", e.g. the way you walk when you're about to miss the bus. It's not a saunter to the bus stop, a stroll to the bar/coffee shop, etc. And it has to add up to at least 30 minutes per day. Believe me, when you start to keep track of the time, it's harder to get there than you think. My friend and I walk about 30 minutes in the morning and we cover about 1 1/2 miles.
Again, that sounds like a reasonable amount of walking / pace for a walkable area when getting around by foot. If you're walking for transportation, you're going to walk somewhat fast because you want to get somewhere.
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