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Old 10-12-2014, 07:46 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,561,754 times
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If things are close and convenient, it's bad because it isn't enough to get exercise. If things are far enough away to provide exercise benefit due to distance, they're too far apart and nobody wants to lug groceries home that far.

All I have is my own experience to call on. I quit my gym membership in order to afford a more expensive house closer to my job in a more walkable neighborhood. I have a weight bench in the basement but don't do any cardio other than walking and the occasional brisk bike ride. In eight years I'm in still the same physical shape and weight range as when I went to the gym 2-3 times a week for weights and treadmill cardio--I'm no crossfit enthusiast but routinely lift things heavier than the TV remote and a few Cheetos. My "routine" is largely casual/recreational walks that I do at a brisk pace because I'm trying to get from Point A to Point B, or with added resistance from carrying groceries. I lead walking tours and routinely wear out people who go to the gym and exercise a lot more vigorously than I do.

And yes, this is all anecdotal experience. Everyone's experience is anecdotal.

Last edited by nei; 10-13-2014 at 12:53 PM..
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
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Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Nope. You're actually the only person who has said that.
So then there is nobody arguing against walking here? Good, we all agree that walking is a healthy activity.
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Old 10-12-2014, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,074,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
For most people an 30 min bike ride would be an 5-10 min. car ride.
Really depends.

Around Seattle I could get around pretty quick. I usually was going about 18-22 mph though. For most of the places I went, it was actually quicker to bike than drive since it took a long time to walk to my car, a long time to park the car, a long time to walk from the car to wherever I was going. Heck, most of the time it just took longer to walk to where my car was parked and back than to walk wherever I wanted to go. Very inconvenient to drive if you're already in Belltown/Capitol Hill. I rarely left the downtown area. West Seattle took about half an hour, but then it usually took 20 minutes to drive there with traffic.

Even here (suburbia), it doesn't take much longer. Farmers market is about a 10 minute drive for me or a 15 minute bike ride. Easy ride too. Most of its got bike paths/MUPs or is really quite residential streets. There's one busier feeder that isn't marked but is so wide you could fit another traffic lane in easily. Fair number of people do bike to it, actually. I wouldn't want to do a full grocery shopping on a bicycle, but it works fine for getting a couple bags of things at the farmers market.
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Old 10-12-2014, 08:03 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,996 posts, read 102,581,357 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
If things are close and convenient, it's bad because it isn't enough to get exercise. If things are far enough away to provide exercise benefit due to distance, they're too far apart and nobody wants to lug groceries home that far.

All I have is my own experience to call on. I quit my gym membership in order to afford a more expensive house closer to my job in a more walkable neighborhood. I have a weight bench in the basement but don't do any cardio other than walking and the occasional brisk bike ride. In eight years I'm in still the same physical shape and weight range as when I went to the gym 2-3 times a week for weights and treadmill cardio--I'm no crossfit enthusiast but routinely lift things heavier than the TV remote and a few Cheetos. My "routine" is largely casual/recreational walks that I do at a brisk pace because I'm trying to get from Point A to Point B, or with added resistance from carrying groceries. I lead walking tours and routinely wear out people who go to the gym and exercise a lot more vigorously than I do.

And yes, this is all anecdotal experience. Everyone's experience is anecdotal.
No one here disagrees that walking is good exercise. Some of us who have some qualifications to say so have pointed out you have to do it in sufficient quantity to get a health benefit. The only one who brought up lugging groceries was you.

Last edited by nei; 10-13-2014 at 12:52 PM.. Reason: bickering
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Old 10-12-2014, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chirack View Post
For most people an 30 min bike ride would be an 5-10 min. car ride.
Not really, the route one would have to drive to get from where I live to where I work would take about 15 minutes without traffic and during rush hour you will experience some traffic. That means it takes roughly 20-25 minutes as long as there isn't any severe backup wish will definitely add time to the drive.

My bike ride is 30 minutes because I haven't ridden in two years and not in the same shape I was 2 years ago. I expect to be able to shave about 5 minutes or so off this commute and bring it down to 25 minutes from door to door.

Now if you are going to downtown, on my bike I always can find parking outside of where I am going, but if you are driving in for an 8 hour job you will need to park in a garage that will cost you about $20-30 a day, and even then you still need to find a parking spot, park, and walk to where you are going which will more than likely be a few blocks away which all adds time to the commute.

So while one is looking for parking after their drive, I am already at my destination. The pluses with my commute is that I get to spend that time getting in a good workout rather than sitting on my butt in a car. Also I am not spending $20-30 a day just to park my car which would then consume a portion of my pay just to drive into the city when I could just as easily do it on bike.
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Old 10-12-2014, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
No one here disagrees that walking is good exercise. Some of us who have some qualifications to say so have pointed out you have to do it in sufficient quantity to get a health benefit. The only one who brought up lugging groceries was you.
10,000 steps or roughly 5 miles of walking is a good marker.

Last edited by Rozenn; 10-13-2014 at 03:04 PM.. Reason: Orphaned
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Old 10-12-2014, 08:13 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,074,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
10,000 steps or roughly 5 miles of walking is a good marker.
Of what?
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Old 10-12-2014, 08:14 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Of what?
Have you not heard of this? Just about every walking app has this as the marker.

Then of course there is this.
https://www.google.com/search?source...%20steps&rct=j

There is a lot of stuff about this on the internet.

Another good link to help explain this.
http://www.workfittreadmill.com/10000steps.php
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Old 10-12-2014, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,074,613 times
Reputation: 12636
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Have you not heard of this? Just about every walking app has this as the marker.

Then of course there is this.
https://www.google.com/search?source...%20steps&rct=j

There is a lot of stuff about this on the internet.

Another good link to help explain this.
How many miles is 10,000 steps
I have a FitBit, actually. Kind of a number geek. But as your links explain, 10,000 steps is just an arbitrary number that doesn't really have any meaning.
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Old 10-12-2014, 08:35 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
I have a FitBit, actually. Kind of a number geek. But as your links explain, 10,000 steps is just an arbitrary number that doesn't really have any meaning.
Okay, it is an arbitrary number that is used in just about every walking app. Still you can't say walking 5 miles or 10K steps isn't a bad thing to do.
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