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Old 10-15-2014, 11:40 AM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,352,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
No. There are lots of topics that are subjective, that are continually debated. There's no need to silence this one.
Of course then the "debate" isn't really a debate but rather a discussion of personal preferences. Some posters are simply unable to accept that others do not share their personal preferences as to what constitutes "walkable".
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Old 10-15-2014, 11:56 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I wasn't saying the dorms were the most universally desired location, only that they're an example of a commons which serves a social function.

Dorms are interesting though, because they're sort of structured like housing in a traditional agricultural village. In traditional villages, shelters are very small (often only one room) and places you go only to sleep, and possibly to eat with your family. Your entire social life was spent outside, unless weather was particularly miserable.

Hell, from what I have read regarding U.S. architectural history, one of the early innovations of colonial (Georgian) houses was to make houses larger, with more rooms. The reason being the climate in the Northeastern U.S. was so much worse in the winter than Britain that socialization needed to take place indoors for part of the year, and traditional 1-2 room British houses were too small to entertain guests.
You really need to quit reading all this "pop" literature. I've been in the Amazon, in the villages, and the bold is just not true.
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Old 10-15-2014, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,538,049 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
Of course then the "debate" isn't really a debate but rather a discussion of personal preferences. Some posters are simply unable to accept that others do not share their personal preferences as to what constitutes "walkable".
Personal preference isn't the same thing of a neighborhood being walkable or not. Sure what is walkable for me might not be walkable for you, but one can also look at the neighborhood as a whole to understand the distances from basic needs, the size of blocks, the amount of traffic and sizes of roads, as well as the crime levels and types of crimes to understand if a place is more walkable or less walkable.

If everyone in a neighborhood needs to drive 15-30 minutes to everything they go to, then that would classify that neighborhood as less walkable or not walkable.
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Old 10-15-2014, 12:35 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,634,943 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
I happen to agree that walkability is subjective. A location could be very walkable to most people, but if none of the destinations are of interest to you, then it's not walkable to you.

Good design is the same way. Not everyone agrees about what "good design" is.

So, if you need solid, black and white, concrete terms to discuss a topic, then perhaps urban planning (and architecture) aren't topics for you.
Huh? I don't get that. There is a Mormon church in my neighborhood that is very walkable for me, but I'm not a Mormon and have no interest in going there. Doesn't make it any less "walkable". Same with the local elementary school, now that I no longer have kids there. It's still walkable.
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Old 10-15-2014, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,538,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Huh? I don't get that. There is a Mormon church in my neighborhood that is very walkable for me, but I'm not a Mormon and have no interest in going there. Doesn't make it any less "walkable". Same with the local elementary school, now that I no longer have kids there. It's still walkable.
Then it sounds like where you live might be classified as somewhat walkable, but where you do live did rank low on walk score.
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Old 10-15-2014, 12:46 PM
 
2,366 posts, read 2,129,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Personal preference isn't the same thing of a neighborhood being walkable or not. Sure what is walkable for me might not be walkable for you, but one can also look at the neighborhood as a whole to understand the distances from basic needs, the size of blocks, the amount of traffic and sizes of roads, as well as the crime levels and types of crimes to understand if a place is more walkable or less walkable.

If everyone in a neighborhood needs to drive 15-30 minutes to everything they go to, then that would classify that neighborhood as less walkable or not walkable.
You don't need destinations in order to walk. You admitted that when you brought up obesity as a reason to why walking should be encourage.
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Old 10-15-2014, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,538,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phyxius View Post
You don't need destinations in order to walk. You admitted that when you brought up obesity as a reason to why walking should be encourage.
If one doesn't have destinations to walk to then the neighborhood isn't walkable, though like any neighborhood, you can pretty much walk around for health reasons if you choose to.
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Old 10-15-2014, 01:27 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,006,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
No, I don't think so. Since your idea of walkable is this: https://www.google.com/maps/search/s...N1ER2oI6CA!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@37.3234...BLDQFcWdTg!2e0

I'd say we're in agreement. It's just that I don't think most people would call that walkable since there's wide streets, fast traffic, not much active building frontage, lots of parking.

Built for of Santa Row absolutely reflects human use. It's intended to be driven to. That's why it faces inward and has abundant parking. It's pretty nice to walk around once you're there though as that's it's intended use. Drive, park, walk around. There's some housing there, of course, but nowhere near enough to support the amount of shopping and dining. Almost no one will walk there and the design reflects that.
You linked to streetviews of Winchester and Stevens Creek Blvds. They're wide roads with lots of traffic, especially on Stevens Creek. Not many people walk along them, only across them from parking or Valley Fair Mall to Santana Row. Both are, strictly speaking, outside of Santana Row. I was talking about the main street within the Row. And, yes, it is inward facing, but the same could be said of most old downtowns, as they tend to be main street strips. That people drive there matters not to the reality that the Row itself is walkable--a point you explicitly concede--even if the surrounding area is not.

Last edited by darkeconomist; 10-15-2014 at 01:43 PM..
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Old 10-15-2014, 01:30 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 2,006,214 times
Reputation: 1348
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Santa Row is walkable for those that live there. But I am guessing Santa Row is a private developer project where their focus is making money, not knitting their development into the surrounding fabric.
The reality remains however, that, within the Row, the space is walkable. That the area around it isn't walkable only showcases the features that make the row a walkable place, and picking out those characteristics is the whole point of this thread.
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Old 10-15-2014, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,266 posts, read 26,258,197 times
Reputation: 11726
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
From the looks of it, I would guess the garage had a separate in and out which would require the driveway to have two lanes.
I guess I just don't understand why they couldn't do this.

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Washi...=12,31.06,,0,0

Doesn't break up the fabric nearly as much.
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