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Old 10-19-2014, 05:57 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33051

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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
You should take a trip back there, rent a car, and drive out of the beach strip to the real part of the metro and let me know what you think of the traffic there.
We didn't go there to evaluate the traffic situation.
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Old 10-19-2014, 05:59 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,066,811 times
Reputation: 12635
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
We didn't go there to evaluate the traffic situation.
You mean you don't fly across the country and rent a car for the explicit purpose of evaluating traffic congestion?

http://mobility.tamu.edu/ums/congestion-data/east-map/

Virginia Beach seems not really that bad. Certainly nothing compared to, say, Washington DC.
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Old 10-19-2014, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
Reputation: 7830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
We didn't go there to evaluate the traffic situation.
Then I guess you won't be able to say what the traffic is like there if you never really experienced the rest of the metro where people live.
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Old 10-19-2014, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,504,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
You mean you don't fly across the country and rent a car for the explicit purpose of evaluating traffic congestion?

Eastern U.S. Cities

Virginia Beach seems not really that bad. Certainly nothing compared to, say, Washington DC.
Based on your link, Virginia Beach ranks 20, and DC is definitely worse if you are including Northern Virginia. Which is also a car centric area outside of a very limited transit system designed to go on in and out of downtown DC. The transit system in the DC metro is still lacking for the size of the metro.
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Old 10-19-2014, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,913,851 times
Reputation: 10533
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
I don't think we're arguing that Palladio is walkable. We both seem to agree that it's not walkable because walkable means more than you can walk around it after you drive there, or at least it does to you and me. For Eschaton, that's not the case. That's the issue. Some people do consider Palladio walkable. Without a consensus on what is and what isn't walkable, there really isn't a way to discuss what makes a place walkable.
I would argue that a shopping mall is walkable space/place within itself. It's not really part of a walkable neighborhood, however, as that would require residents. Only real way to make a shopping mall into a walkable neighborhood is to have apartments which are actually inside the mall. At that point it really wouldn't be functionally different from say a "pocket neighborhood" of old commercial development and some housing which happens to be surrounded by arterials/highways which block off outside pedestrian access.
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Old 10-19-2014, 06:33 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,066,811 times
Reputation: 12635
The full excel data set provides a lot of useful information.

Sacramento, for example, the average auto commuter would spend an extra two hours annually in traffic if public transportation did not exist with an increased congestion cost of $38 million. Sacramento RTD alone (there are other transit agencies in the metro area), has as an operating budget of $143 million per year with 73% coming from the general taxpayer or $104 million. So the taxpayer pays $104 million to operate transit the relieves $38 million worth of congestion expense. Taxpayer funding should be reduced to the amount it is a public benefit and fares increased.

http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/ums/co...plete-data.xls
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Old 10-19-2014, 07:58 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,554,590 times
Reputation: 33051
Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
You mean you don't fly across the country and rent a car for the explicit purpose of evaluating traffic congestion?

Eastern U.S. Cities

Virginia Beach seems not really that bad. Certainly nothing compared to, say, Washington DC.
LOL! We had a good time!
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Old 10-19-2014, 11:39 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,558,119 times
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Farmers are a perfect example of short live/work distance--the archetypal family farm involved no commuting, as the family lived on the farm. There are exceptions, of course--New England farming villages often had residences in the center and the farms a short distance away, and California farming was dominated by corporate farms worked by migrant farm workers. But generally, farmers didn't commute from home to the farm where they worked--on horseback, wagons, streetcars, cars or whatever. They got out of bed and walked to the barn to milk the cows, or whatever labor was done earliest in the morning. Vehicles were used to cover longer distances necessitated by the size of a farm, and generally the purpose of the vehicle was to carry tools or goods, not people. The wagon used to bring goods to market was a cargo vehicle, not a commuter vehicle. The traditional family farm was relatively self-contained--so you could say that a family farm is a very "walkable" situation. And because not everyone in farming regions were farmers, even much of that "rural" population lived in villages and small towns, which were also very walkable, again, because there wasn't the option to make them unwalkable.
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Old 10-20-2014, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,066,811 times
Reputation: 12635
Try going to a farm in the midwest and telling me it's walkable. =D
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Old 10-20-2014, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Philaburbia
32,366 posts, read 59,807,408 times
Reputation: 54006
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Have you ever been to Virginia Beach, VA? It is a metro of 7 cities with very little transit.
Only about 2 dozen times, including every year for the past 10 years. I've found the traffic to be typical of a heavily populated region, especially at rush hour. I've never had any trouble getting to or from Virginia Beach from anywhere in the area, at any time of day, unless there's an accident on my route.
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