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Old 04-30-2014, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Out West
22,707 posts, read 16,813,625 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LivingDeadGirl View Post
No offense but when I read this all I could think about is loss of freedom and the threat of governments controlling populations since they are congregated in population areas. It is absurd and borders on communism. Read some studies about health, crowding and the disintegration of societal morals when people are too tightly grouped together. Is this what is being contemplated in university sociology classes now adays !!
Agreed.

I've lived in cities most of my life. I now live in a much, much, much smaller area. I have found far more peace than I ever found in a city. I do not agree with the poster that cities are "more desirable". Maybe to the OP, but not to everyone else.

I am not ticked off all the time anymore, I'm sure that's doing my heart some good.
I am not sitting in traffic, breathing in toxic fumes all day long anymore. I'm sure that's doing my health some good.
I get fresh air every single day. I'm sure that's doing my health some good.
I meet people who are friendly, even to strangers, so I'm sure that's doing my health some good.
I get to exchange goods with other people such as fruits/veggies for their chickens eggs or some goat's milk...none of it laden with pesticides and other garbage...that we have been led to believe we "need". I'm sure that is definitely doing my health some good.

(For the record, when I was very young, we took a school field trip to a farm. On that farm were goats. We got some goat's milk that was pretty much straight from the goat. All these years later, I still haven't died because I drank it. It tasted really good. In fact, it was so good, I thought for sure I liked goat's milk so I bought some in the store. NOT even close! That stuff in the store is disgusting. Anyway, that field trip happened when I lived in CA...before that state destroyed everything with their endless laws.)

No, we should not force people to live in urban areas. Yes, it is hard to find employment in rural areas, but there are ways around it. I am now self employed and doing BETTER than I ever did living in a city. I make more than I did, but my cost of living is lower...so it's like I'm making two times the amount I ever did at my highest paying gig in the city. If you like the city, you stay there. Leave us who are sick of it, alone. We'll figure it out.
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Old 04-30-2014, 01:28 PM
 
15,530 posts, read 13,519,456 times
Reputation: 21236
OP, how old are you? You sound like some 20 year old who heard a few things somewhere, now all off a sudden to have the magic answer to all problems, and people are rather ignorant if they do not lsiten to you; basically you sound like an academic inspired person with zero real experience in life, thus no way to convey the practicality nor the conecpt of any academics you come across. The only way you think is appropriate for making people act the way you think they should act for this perfect world of yours is by force.

Oh yes, white people are evil, they should not be allowed to live together in groups, obviously influenced by some hyped up liberal professor(s)/area/your own culture.
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Old 04-30-2014, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,233 posts, read 12,491,644 times
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This thread seems to be focused on the rural poor, not the rural middle class and the rural upper class. In my area, anyone with five hundred acres of well managed timber can live very well indeed. That will provide about a quarter of a million a year on a sustained basis, plus non-forest incidentals like cattle. Property taxes are deferred on forest land and collected at harvest time as a timber severance tax. Even small parcel middle class folk like me benefit from a vital timber economy. I only have 93 acres, but log prices were up last year and I pocketed an extra $40k after taxes from logging just 8 acres. This is in addition to SS and a small pension, so I do just fine. My wife is still working full time, so before any taxes or deductions, our gross income in 2013 was $162k. We're both 67 years old and still putting the max into our IRA accounts. My mother is still living, and has been collecting the rent off of two farms for over 30 years in retirement. She has been able to fund her grandson's college tuition out of cash flow, without touching her savings.

Perhaps Oregon is the exception. We have had comprehensive land use planning for over 30 years, so have avoided the 2 acre rural mini slums that are a problem in many states. However, it seems to me that you are talking about small town poor, not rural poor. If you have a municipal water and sewer system, you are not rural. Yes, small towns are dying. My mother grew up in Kearney, NE, and they don't even have a high school there any more. Many downtowns are nothing but boarded buildings, but that is an urban problem, not a rural problem.
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Old 04-30-2014, 02:41 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,986 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by boxus View Post
Oh yes, white people are evil, they should not be allowed to live together in groups, obviously influenced by some hyped up liberal professor(s)/area/your own culture.
The OP is definitely not liberal [from his previous in other threads].
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Old 04-30-2014, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,233 posts, read 12,491,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I talked a guy (18 years old) who said growing up in a rural area in the foothills of the southern Sierra (near Sequoia National Park) was great. My response: "you live in a tinderbox".
That's a problem that can be planned for. Put a metal roof on the house, clean your gutters every spring, maintain a defensible area around the house and a brush-free road with a turnaround that is adequate for fire engines. Fill a swimming pool sized reservoir with water for fire department use. The houses that burn down are the ones that the fire department can't defend without putting their crews at risk. They may not want you there, so have a travel trailer, RV or tent packed up and ready to leave.

I have one friend who was right in the middle of the Douglas Complex fire last summer. Her house and all her outbuildings were fine, and salvage logging the burned timber put $100k in her pocket. She has replanted and it's already greening up.
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Old 04-30-2014, 02:48 PM
 
15,530 posts, read 13,519,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The OP is definitely not liberal [from his previous in other threads].
I did not state the OP was liberal, I stated his statement regarding Caucasians is influenced.
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Old 04-30-2014, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,472 posts, read 5,143,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonesuch View Post
New Hampshire is a shining example of over-representation -- Everybody knows their state reps, usually personally. Nearly all taxation is local (property tax, there is no broad-based income or sales tax), and with the town meeting system, residents vote on each tiny increment in property taxes and how it is to be spent. And the bulk of the state is vast emptiness, 80% forest with scattered pockets of "rural" white folk suffering from all that extra freedom. Horrible place, stay away!
I agree. Stay away from NH. It's a terrible place!
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Old 04-30-2014, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Central CT, sometimes NH.
3,472 posts, read 5,143,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Fine, let it be their choice. But let' see what happens when the government decides they will not deliver government subsidies out there. Imagine no post office, fire, and social services out in the country. Or better yet, let's stop subsidizing and make local rural residents have higher taxes.

I guess I should change my stance to "discourage rural living for the poor, and allow the rich to be able to afford living out in the country"
New Hampshire ranks near the top in nearly every metric in the nation regarding quality of life. It has a low poverty rate, low unemployment rate and a low number of people receiving social services. It is a success story largely because many of its rural residents believe in the "live free or die" motto. People work hard and many may work 2 or 3 part-time jobs but they generally work jobs doing things that they enjoy that allow them to live the life they want to live. Most are not subscribers to rat race-mentality as they tend to be independent spirits that are skeptical of "grand plans." That is why over 50% of New Hampshire's residents were born somewhere else and chose to move to NH.

As mentioned before, "It's a horrible place. Stay away."
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Old 04-30-2014, 05:45 PM
 
320 posts, read 350,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
I remember in one of my sociology classes seeing statistics that most of the poverty in America was actually in rural areas and small towns.

I just see allowing communities in rural areas as bad. To some extent, you have to some rural living for the farmers. Then again, here in CA many of the wealthy farmers now have second homes in more urban and more desirable settings. The others left behind in the farming communities like the field workers live in areas with high crime and poverty. These communities are then gullible for Wal-Mart, prisons, and other institutions to come in just to get the jobs. Not to bash on the South, but look at how many prisons and Wal-Mart in rural and small towns you have with one of those nearby. What happens if we decide we can get field work done without field workers or a drought happens? With the push for sustainable farming, more people are getting pushed out of a job in rural America. Then you have many factories that closed due to greedy corporations and & hungry consumers outsourcing jobs of the USA. Not to mention, it costs more to get resources out to the rural areas. I remember stories of a lady who lost her job and had no car to get to the city and lived in a trailer out in the country and was forced to walk a long distance to a job at Burger King. How does that even exist in America???

If people live close to urban centers, and I'm not even saying push everyone to major cities but to push people close to metros with at least 125,000-150,000 population. Then people have access to social services, more socialization options, better healthcare, and public transportation and heck even the possible of biking to work.

I have lived in suburban part of a major city, a rural town, and have visited urban centers of many downtowns.

Living in the rural town was the worse. Except for my town, the region was mostly middle and working class people. The town people were not used to anything other than Caucasian similar minded people. The area slowly started going downhill and now it's rapidly going downhill. There are empty shopping centers, rising crime rates, and deteriorating roads. Cities are asking for tax sales increases and water is now a problem. The only reason my town was middle class and some upper middle class was the presence of a hospital, the lack of allowing more people to move there, and a good school district. More people in the rural area are commuting to the county seat where the urban center is for jobs. The south side of one of the towns is all sprawl for commuters to live there and be able to commute to the county seat for jobs.

Anyways, enough of my rant. My kids are going are not going to live in the same rural experience I lived in.
Well, just wait till Agenda 21 kicks into full force....
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Old 04-30-2014, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,233 posts, read 12,491,644 times
Reputation: 19379
Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Fine, let it be their choice. But let' see what happens when the government decides they will not deliver government subsidies out there. Imagine no post office, fire, and social services out in the country. Or better yet, let's stop subsidizing and make local rural residents have higher taxes.

I guess I should change my stance to "discourage rural living for the poor, and allow the rich to be able to afford living out in the country"
Poor people can't live in the country because there are almost no rentals, and buying land is beyond their means. Rural residents don't have or need social services. They have resources. They have the skills and ability to care for themselves. You are just fixated on poor people in small towns and are calling them "rural." They are not.

The post office is already eliminating rural free delivery. They are replacing individual mail boxes with centralized PO boxes that residents have to drive to. They don't do rural parcel delivery any more. If you want a package delivered to your door, it has to go FedEx or UPS. We pay for our own fire district, thank you. We don't get police patrols, so everyone is responsible for their own security. Rural taxes are minimal because we don't need all the stuff and services that bleed the townies dry.
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