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Old 04-28-2014, 12:37 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
A lot of these things are happening in parts of rural American already. As others have said, rural areas and small towns have been losing population for decades, probably beginning within a couple decades of the Civil War actually, although it became a flood in the 20th century. It's likely that the OP may get his/her wish before 2100 ... albeit without coercion.
As mentioned for New England, population loss started before the Civil War, in some places around 1830. But some of those leaving were moving to farmland further west, rather than leaving the countryside althougher.
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Old 04-28-2014, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Hawaii-Puna District
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
I remember in one of my sociology classes seeing statistics that most of the poverty in America was actually in rural areas and small towns...
It is a lot easier to actually live in poverty in a rural area than in a major urban area.

If you were single and made $15k a year, would you be better off in a rural area or some expensive, crowded urban area? Go further and suppose you were married with 1 kid and the 2 parents combined made $30k. Which family would most likely be the happiest?
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Old 04-28-2014, 01:16 PM
 
Location: inside, where it is warm or cool depending on the season
117 posts, read 117,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
... push everyone to major cities but to push people close to metros with at least 125,000-150,000 population. Then people have access to social services, more socialization options, better healthcare, and public transportation and heck even the possible of biking to work.

Anyways, enough of my rant. My kids are going are not going to live in the same rural experience I lived in.
Why push anyone anywhere? Let people push themselves where they want to be. You did. Some want that lifestyle for whatever reason.

That said we'll start to see a roation out of equity markets and into hard asset markets such as commodities (benefiting those with productive land - in rural areas) over the next few decades (starting....now). In other words you might reach a point where you WISHED you were back on the farm. Hard to believe, eh? Yes now it is but wait until ----- happens. It'll be the farmers driving Lambos and the unemployed city folk looking for country/farm jobs.
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Old 04-28-2014, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Northern panhandle WV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
Think of urban, suburban, and rural as a circle. You first have a small circle in the middle which is your urban. Then you have your suburban circle surrounding the urban circle. Then you have the last circle which is the rural where your farms and farmers should be and some others. But then there is the outliers and these outliers are some of the very rural areas where some decided they wanted to live there while others moved there, so in hopes of affordable living would make their lives better. In the heart of circle, the urban is where social services is. Social services is pretty close to the suburban circle. But when you get too far away from social services in the middle, then you lose close access to places to use your food stamps and Community Health Centers and homeless shelters and people's kitchen.

And when I mean "push" I don't mean force, but create incentives (could be harsh incentives and some gentle incentives) for people to leave where they are renting or own land in a rural area to come live closer to center.

And btw, rather you live in a rural area or a city, the government has authority in that area. You are rather controlled by the county or city government.

I feel at least in cities you have some power to get more individualized representation. At least, more so for smaller cities. Probably not that different for rural areas since a board of supervisors, here in CA, makes the decision for all the people living in the county boundaries.

I don't advocate for forcing people to live in soviet-style high rise apartments. I believe we can increase density in suburban and urban without making everything all urban.
Yours is one of the most disturbing posts I have read on City Data ever, I cannot think of ANY reason why people should be leaving the rural areas for Citys or URBAN if you prefer and I can think of plenty of reasons for people to flee the urban areas for the rural and that will be happening more and more in the future, thank goodness.

I am Horrified by your suggestions and posts.
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Old 04-28-2014, 04:25 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,925,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by capoeira View Post
I see the exact opposite happening. When the economy collapses the cities will be the worst places to be. The internet is the great equalizer between the cities and small towns. I do not need shopping malls in urban locations, I can order anything I want on Amazon, B&H, JR, Iherb, Vitacost etc.,etc. With my computer I can trade the markets in New York, London or Hong Kong from any small town in America. Young people in small towns can take online classes from many universities, there is no need to be physically present in overcrowded classes.

I am looking forward to moving out of my big city to an uncrowded location, maybe to a lakefront home in Northern Wisconsin or somewhere in the mountains of western North Carolina.
OMG r u kidding? without malls and stores, you won't get the variety and all the sales. online doesn't offer you all that.

online courses? those are really hard. it means more bookwork and requires good time management skills. and places like brandman university have high drop out rates. getting your master's degree online is the only time it's acceptable to do online. don't forget online school costs more. and the cheap ones aren't that reputable.
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Old 04-28-2014, 04:28 PM
 
4,832 posts, read 10,925,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanantoniomike View Post
Why push anyone anywhere? Let people push themselves where they want to be. You did. Some want that lifestyle for whatever reason.

That said we'll start to see a roation out of equity markets and into hard asset markets such as commodities (benefiting those with productive land - in rural areas) over the next few decades (starting....now). In other words you might reach a point where you WISHED you were back on the farm. Hard to believe, eh? Yes now it is but wait until ----- happens. It'll be the farmers driving Lambos and the unemployed city folk looking for country/farm jobs.
Im pretty sure i heard it somewhere people r shifting to cities and urban areas from the rural. Of course, some stats r inaccurate because i see a lot of rural population growth coming from migrant workers with their families coming here. '
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Old 04-28-2014, 05:24 PM
 
5,076 posts, read 8,559,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arwenmark View Post
I cannot think of ANY reason why people should be leaving the rural areas for Citys or URBAN if you prefer and I can think of plenty of reasons for people to flee the urban areas for the rural and that will be happening more and more in the future, thank goodness.
How about jobs and services? Rural folks driving 50 miles each way to a minimum wage job and grandma having to drive 50 miles to the doctor or worse, the ER, isn't scalable. It's fine for those people that can afford it. However I get the impression that OP was referring to the other people who would rather not live in rural poverty if better options were readily available. There's a definite line between those that are really sustaining a living in a rural area and those dependent on government services and benefits in part because they're living in a rural area. The latter group, or perhaps their children may see a benefit from programs that provide incentives to get out of jobless communities dependent on government handouts.
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Old 04-28-2014, 06:06 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Around 50% of my family is from rural areas. Most left because there was no economic activity/no jobs. The ones that stayed (that aren't retired and on social security) are struggling in every way. They can't find jobs, they can't afford to drive to "town" where there are only low was jobs anyway, and it is the rural south were there is still more than enough racism to go around.

In my mom's rural town, you can walk to church (our "family church" where we already have burial plots reserved) and the corner store. The streets were super quiet, so we played tag on the street. My dad's rural neighborhood isn't walkable because they lived on a rural highway with a 45 mph limit.

People should be able to choose to live where they want, and a lot of people are not choosing rural.

My parents (retired mostly) live in a rural part of CA, that is near an exburb. They like it, but you couldn't pay me enough to live there. The only thing that is walkable is the grape fields for the winery, a cherry orchard and some walnut trees. Oh and a corner store. On the up note, my parents can call the corner store, and they will deliver a six pack or the newspaper. And my parents make special requests for spicy sausages, and the owners oblige. They also make their own goat cheese.

There are lots of neighborhood types between a rural area, soviet block apartments and Manhattan skyscrapers. I prefer moderate density.
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Old 04-28-2014, 07:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
there is no fixing those problems. The economy of rural areas and small towns will continue to decline until they are government subsidized or the economy collapses.

I doubt that when poor people come to the cities or suburbs, that they will become more poor. Even anything they will get better access to social services, public transportation, and healthcare and free food. They will have more help to get out of poverty. They will also have close access to large community colleges.
I am not sure I can describe how incredibly pretentious you are coming off in this comment - "if these boorish hicks would just enlighten themselves and adopt the way I demand they live and have deemed sophisticated enough for them, they would be so much more palatable to my senses".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
What kind of jobs are these people going to find in the cities and suburbs? The same low skill, low pay kind of jobs they had in their small town. The difference is that instead of being able to rent a crappy apartment for $400/month, they have to shell out twice that for a worse place in a more dangerous area.

You seem to think that the rural poor are poor simply because of lack of opportunity. I disagree. Having access to education and plentiful jobs hasn't eradicated the urban poor, has it? .
THANK YOU! If it were just a matter of "having access" then there should be not a bit of poverty in the shangri-la's of Detroit and south side of Chicago.

Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
OMG r u kidding? without malls and stores, you won't get the variety and all the sales. online doesn't offer you all that.

online courses? those are really hard. it means more bookwork and requires good time management skills. and places like brandman university have high drop out rates. getting your master's degree online is the only time it's acceptable to do online. don't forget online school costs more. and the cheap ones aren't that reputable.
Again, the degree of pretentiousness in the above...:

1) Only being packed into congested malls can you find sales because you cannot possibly do basic research on sites such as for online coupon codes or otherwise (not to mention you don't have to spend money in gas, etc. to get to the mall while you pay too much for crap fast food)

2) A liberal mindset that pushes everyone into cities because "that's what's good for you" is the same one that declares only publicly funded "urban universities" can possibly be sophisticated enough to offer an education. Do some who attend private online schools fail? Sure...but let's not pretend there are large numbers of failures in the public schools too - not the least of which being public K-12.

...is either astounding and comes from a dark and selfish place, or this is the clear evidence of just plain trolling for its own sake.
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Old 04-28-2014, 07:23 PM
 
15,742 posts, read 13,655,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post
OMG r u kidding? without malls and stores, you won't get the variety and all the sales. online doesn't offer you all that.

online courses? those are really hard. it means more bookwork and requires good time management skills. and places like brandman university have high drop out rates. getting your master's degree online is the only time it's acceptable to do online. don't forget online school costs more. and the cheap ones aren't that reputable.
What? Stores do not offer near the variety online does; I think you need to go back and reassess things if you do not even know this basic info.
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