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Old 05-02-2014, 11:11 AM
 
Location: northern Vermont - previously NM, WA, & MA
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Think of large cities that have annexed a lot of land and have formed suburbs within their city limits such as Houston, San Antonio, and even Albuquerque. Also mega suburbs like Mesa, AZ and Aurora, CO. Do you think as these cities mature and evolve that neighborhoods, communities, and suburbs within will start to breakaway into their own municipalities for reasons such as school districting, tax structure, and simply to form their own identities?

I think a prime example may be Albuquerque. It certainly does not feel like a city of over 500,000 residents. But over the years new development has stretched its boundaries. I could see a new independent city west of the Rio Grande (known locally as the West Side) forming on its own as most everything is newer over there, has a different vibe, feel, and socio economic structure, and feels pretty removed from the city of Albuquerque itself.

Are there other examples or even active ideas of new cities seceding from within large cities?

pardon the typo in the thread tittle - reverse

Last edited by Desert_SW_77; 05-02-2014 at 11:35 AM..
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Old 05-02-2014, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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I think a lot would depend upon the local incorporation rules in the state.

I know in Pennsylvania it's literally impossible to have any area of a city or borough secede unless there is a majority vote in favor both within the part seceding and the remaining "rump" area. There was a move in the late 1980s for Northeast Philadelphia (which is semi-suburban, and was overwhelmingly white and somewhat Republican at that time), to secede, but it would have required a special act of the legislature. The movement fizzled out, as the election of Ed Rendell smoothed over some of the racial resentments that occurred during Goode's mayoralty.

There has been a perennial movement in LA for the San Fernando Valley to secede since the 1970s. It went to a vote in 2002, and a slight majority of San Fernando residents voted in favor. However, the rump of LA voted against in large numbers, so it didn't happen.

The bottom line is cities can only break up realistically in states where the law requires a majority only in the seceding portion, or if a special act of the legislature is passed.
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Old 05-02-2014, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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It really depends on the state, I believe most states it is near impossible to break away like this. Though I know of plenty of neighborhoods that create their own identity that is uniquely it's own.
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Old 05-02-2014, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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There is a movement for Aurora to become a city/county. Currently, it's part of three counties.
Aurora eyeing city and county status - The Denver Post

When Broomfield became a city/county, after having been part of at least 4 counties, the schools stayed the same.
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Old 05-02-2014, 08:04 PM
 
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Some, probably most, States do not allow cities to annex incorporated suburbs in the first place.
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Old 05-02-2014, 08:06 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
There is a movement for Aurora to become a city/county. Currently, it's part of three counties.
Aurora eyeing city and county status - The Denver Post

When Broomfield became a city/county, after having been part of at least 4 counties, the schools stayed the same.
County land becoming a city is typically more doable than a part of a city leaving to become its own city.
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Old 05-02-2014, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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As mentioned, the SFV attempted to secede and failed. Interestingly, Hollywood did too in the same election - the district of Hollywood didn't even have a majority that wanted to secede. Not sure if there is any momentum for another attempt for the SFV these days, I don't think so. The Valley would still be one of the biggest cities in the US so it would have a lot of the same problems (plus a top contender for the new city's name was Camelot.... Oy.)
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Old 05-02-2014, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
County land becoming a city is typically more doable than a part of a city leaving to become its own city.
Maybe in YOUR state, not necessarily in Colorado.
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Old 05-02-2014, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Maybe in YOUR state, not necessarily in Colorado.
So it is easier in Colorado for a part of a city to secede from that city to become their own city? I didn't know that.
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Old 05-02-2014, 09:50 PM
 
2,825 posts, read 3,358,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Some, probably most, States do not allow cities to annex incorporated suburbs in the first place.
That's because "incorporated" means the "suburbs" are city-type political subdivisions themselves.
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