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Old 05-07-2014, 08:09 AM
 
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Where to learn urban forestry: SUNY-ESF, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
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Old 05-08-2014, 10:28 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Many people are surprised how many street trees one finds in Albuquerque (though mostly absent on the major boulevards), especially since the highest profile presentation of Albuquerque, Breaking Bad, artfully avoided filming anything that didn't make the city look as bleak and sun-baked/windblown as possible.

However, despite the existence of several native species of trees that can grow here (various poplars, willows, and pines), about 95% of the street and garden trees are not only non-native, but invasive; Siberian Elm, Alianthus (sumac), Locust, etc.
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Old 05-08-2014, 11:21 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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I would have assumed invasive trees would be difficult in a semi-arid environment.
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Old 05-09-2014, 02:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlife78 View Post
Wow, I didn't know those plants weren't native to California. Funny the things we bring to places that don't belong there.
They are native to Australia.
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Old 05-10-2014, 12:38 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I would have assumed invasive trees would be difficult in a semi-arid environment.
Not if they come from semi-arid regions. The invasive trees in Albuquerque, such as Siberian Elm and Alianthus, come from semi-arid steppe regions of Asia which have a very similar climate.

The iconic tumbleweeds of the American southwest are also an invasive from the Russian steppe and didn't actually show up until the train came though in the late 19th century.
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Old 05-11-2014, 05:00 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Funny story about street trees.

First off the Town is designated a Tree City by the Arbor Day Foundation. The first thing the rural pioneers do when they by a house is cut all the trees down, usually without a Critical Areas removal permit which mandates mitigation. I blame the tree removal contractors who know better but do it anyway.

About 20 years ago we started an aggressive street tree planting program, especially near the waterfront where all the older trees had been removed over the years.

Everyone living there was enthusiastic. Trees got planted, around $100K worth when all the costs were totaled up. Within a month the demands started that the trees be removed. The town government refused so after a few more months the trees started to die on their own. Well with some help from someone girdling them at night. A $100K down the toilet.

Sooo, crepe myrtles were planted next. Each year they suffer crepe murder since adjacent owners don't want them to leaf out, claim they ruin the view.

We just started a new study for planting street trees. Enthusiasm all around.
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Old 05-14-2014, 09:51 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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^^^ You have a strange culture there.
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Old 05-20-2014, 08:29 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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Raleigh loves its trees so much that they knitted sweaters for them.
Tree sweaters decorate Glenwood South | abc11.com
Glenwood South, Tree Sweaters, Retail Raleigh, SpiritWorks
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Old 05-21-2014, 08:49 AM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
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Nice work, Newsweek, telling me I've reached my 5 free article per month limit despite this being the first time I've ever gone to Newsweek.com
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Old 05-21-2014, 08:52 AM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
3,067 posts, read 2,140,521 times
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Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
We have lots of trees in my neighborhood. California screwed up,though. We planted eucalyptus trees all over. So much so everyone thinks they are native. They aren't, and they are really flammable. Horrible for the hilly neighborhoods they are in. So as the trees die, they are being removed. Eucalyptus is a pest.

The best treescape, was during my childhood in San Jose. It was a tribute to the orchard past. Lots of walnut, plum, and cherry trees. My mom used to stop and grab the walnuts. Hehehhe.
One of the four comments on the Newsweek article is from a San Franciscan eucalyptus conservationist, heh.

Different section of the state, but I remember reading about Anaheim's orange tree-filled past and how that was sacrificed to sprawl
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