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Old 05-02-2014, 05:11 PM
 
57,527 posts, read 82,049,576 times
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Here's an interesting article about how planting trees within cities can have health and other benefits for its residents: http://www.newsweek.com/2014/05/09/m...es-249162.html
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Old 05-02-2014, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,797,574 times
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I am a huge fan of trees in the city. Portland is a great example of what a city with tree lined streets can look and feel like.

In the US, I think a number of cities would see improvements in their downtowns if they would spend some money and line their downtown streets with trees.
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Old 05-02-2014, 07:04 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Great article. I'm glad they've added to the data.
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Old 05-03-2014, 05:46 AM
 
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They shouldn't put the same types of trees all around. Witness problems with elms about 50 years ago and ashes lately.
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Old 05-03-2014, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,909 posts, read 7,721,493 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
They shouldn't put the same types of trees all around. Witness problems with elms about 50 years ago and ashes lately.
In my previous neighborhood, the neighborhood organization received a grant to plant some street trees. When we met with the city forester, he made a point of saying he tries to promote species diversity throughout the city.

In our case, we planted an equal number of service-berry and lilac trees.
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Old 05-03-2014, 07:05 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,267 posts, read 103,354,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
They shouldn't put the same types of trees all around. Witness problems with elms about 50 years ago and ashes lately.
Yeah, we're going to lose a couple of Ashes. The emerald ash-borer is about 5 miles away and advancing.
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Old 05-05-2014, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,172 posts, read 29,968,294 times
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We have lots of trees in my neighborhood. California screwed up,though. We planted eucalyptus trees all over. So much so everyone thinks they are native. They aren't, and they are really flammable. Horrible for the hilly neighborhoods they are in. So as the trees die, they are being removed. Eucalyptus is a pest.

The best treescape, was during my childhood in San Jose. It was a tribute to the orchard past. Lots of walnut, plum, and cherry trees. My mom used to stop and grab the walnuts. Hehehhe.
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Old 05-05-2014, 08:41 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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San Francisco is one of the more treeless cities in the US:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=San+F...18.09,,0,-5.57

Boston is generally more treed despite being nearly similar density-wise
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Old 05-05-2014, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
San Francisco is one of the more treeless cities in the US:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=San+F...18.09,,0,-5.57

Boston is generally more treed despite being nearly similar density-wise
SF doesn't have much street greenery. Oakland has lots in some areas.

Oakland Streets: A Tree Grows in Oakland

Interesting blog post on this.

This is around the corner from me in Oakland, my street looks similar.

https://maps.gstatic.com/m/streetvie...587825675,,0,0
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Old 05-06-2014, 08:14 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,797,574 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
We have lots of trees in my neighborhood. California screwed up,though. We planted eucalyptus trees all over. So much so everyone thinks they are native. They aren't, and they are really flammable. Horrible for the hilly neighborhoods they are in. So as the trees die, they are being removed. Eucalyptus is a pest.

The best treescape, was during my childhood in San Jose. It was a tribute to the orchard past. Lots of walnut, plum, and cherry trees. My mom used to stop and grab the walnuts. Hehehhe.
Wow, I didn't know those plants weren't native to California. Funny the things we bring to places that don't belong there.
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