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Old 05-09-2014, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,674,744 times
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Almost all of our 'burbs are working on walkable downtowns or enhancing existing ones. They aren't trying to attract "new" residents. Just enhance it for the existing community.

This site is all about that trend and provides resources for small communities to become more "smart growth" oriented and walkable.
Home - Strong Towns
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Old 05-09-2014, 06:46 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 21 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,008 posts, read 102,606,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tvdxer View Post

To truly succeed, the cities will have to become child-friendly.
A.G.R.E.E.D! And they haven't seemed to have figured that out yet.
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Old 05-09-2014, 08:26 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,104,114 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
A.G.R.E.E.D! And they haven't seemed to have figured that out yet.
?

How do you figure
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Old 05-20-2014, 12:22 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
As for Long Island, 20 something often moved to suburban downtowns if they stayed rather than move to NYC. At least if renting, once they bought a house, then they moved wherever was a good deal. But the interest in suburban downtowns was more to be where other young people and nightlife was rather than specifically urbanity. Here's an article on Long Island young people moving out of the burbs.

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/17/ny...s-to-grow.html
Related to the same article, the change in population of NYC suburbia (chose Fairfield County as an example, which maybe a bit atypical including in the extremely high housing costs in some towns) mapped against housing prices. Mapped against housing prices by town. And the aging of the burbs:



Old Urbanist: NYC Suburban Demographics: Choice or Fate?

Part is that most of the suburbs were built in the 50s or 60s and then construction mostly stopped. Young families moved in and then aged.
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Old 05-20-2014, 05:29 PM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,834,426 times
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I think the Old Urbanist has it right in that the aging of the NYC suburbs is probably largely due to cost; young people can't afford to live there. This is particularly true in the NYC area where so many of the jobs are in Manhattan and commuting is so expensive and difficult; it can make sense for young singles and couples to pay as much for a small apartment in Manhattan as they would for a house in the suburbs, because commuting time and cost is so high.

But they missed something here: "Although the Times quotes a Westchester County source disputing the figures and noting that the "county’s own enrollment data shows that more children are attending its schools, a telling sign of young families," a glance at the Census figures reveals that the under-5 population in many of these towns is plummeting as well."

I resolve the paradox thus: The under-5 population doesn't attend school. Prices are so high in Westchester County suburbs that families don't move in until schools become an immediate priority.

Despite the Times headline, there's no exodus; if there were an exodus, prices would be falling, not rising.
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Old 05-20-2014, 07:23 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Agreed. However, the other possibility is that older childless adults are staying "in place", so there's little turnover of homes available for young families due to the lack of children.

With little new construction and limited housing turnover, combined with greatly elevated prices, these towns await a generational shift.

Just how big will that shift be? The Westport town newspaper, at it happens, suggests dramatic changes after 2015. According to one quoted source, "there's going to be major turnover in property. People who currently own homes and have for a long time, are going to decide to downsize. When turnover does occur, you'll get a flood of students entering elementary school."
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Old 05-22-2014, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Toronto, ON
564 posts, read 878,264 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Almost all of our 'burbs are working on walkable downtowns or enhancing existing ones. They aren't trying to attract "new" residents. Just enhance it for the existing community.

This site is all about that trend and provides resources for small communities to become more "smart growth" oriented and walkable.
Home - Strong Towns
We are seeing the same thing in some of our sprawling suburban areas around Toronto, with smaller cities like Mississauga, Markham, and Vaughan all working hard to establish "mini-downtowns" in their respective cores.
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