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Old 05-24-2014, 09:56 PM
 
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It's also a lot easier to design for just one mode. When you don't have to take anything into consideration except the needs of the automobile, it makes urban planning much, much simpler. But trying to effectively balance and plan for the needs of a wide variety of users (transit, cars, pedestrians, cyclists etc) actually requires a great deal of thought and skill.
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Old 05-25-2014, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Vancouver, Canada
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I haven't read through the entire thread, but I answer to the OP, I've found most small towns here in BC have fairly intact main streets. The places that have lost the core have tended to be mid-sized cities and suburbs.

I've mostly lived in cities, but, I lived in Osoyoos for many years and though you do need a car to live anywhere but right in the center of town, the main street area is well-defined and thriving. I can think of a dozen little towns that are just the same.

Places that have the low-density amorphous quality have tended to be medium-sized mall-centric cities, like Kelowna or Langley.
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Old 05-25-2014, 08:46 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CairoCanadian View Post
Places that have the low-density amorphous quality have tended to be medium-sized mall-centric cities, like Kelowna or Langley.
See also: Chilliwack
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Old 05-30-2014, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Jamestown, NY
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Why don't we live in castles any more? The question posed by this thread and the responses to reflect most of the posters' ignorance of/disregard for the fact that we live in a universe in which everything changes constantly!!! Nothing is static and permanent.

America in 2014 isn't like it was in 1954 or 1894 or 1834 or 1764, so of course, "Main Street" isn't the same, either. More importantly, why is "Main Street", Smalltown USA circa 1954 worthy of all the nostalgia when most people back then were either for improving it or leaving it?

It's also ironic to see people waxing nostalgic for "Main Street", Smalltown, USA circa 1954 on their PCs, laptops, and iphones when if the world had been frozen in 1954, they would be writing with fountain pens on stationery and mailing letters rather than posting on a MB.
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Old 05-30-2014, 05:52 AM
 
56,780 posts, read 81,149,048 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
Why don't we live in castles any more? The question posed by this thread and the responses to reflect most of the posters' ignorance of/disregard for the fact that we live in a universe in which everything changes constantly!!! Nothing is static and permanent.

America in 2014 isn't like it was in 1954 or 1894 or 1834 or 1764, so of course, "Main Street" isn't the same, either. More importantly, why is "Main Street", Smalltown USA circa 1954 worthy of all the nostalgia when most people back then were either for improving it or leaving it?

It's also ironic to see people waxing nostalgic for "Main Street", Smalltown, USA circa 1954 on their PCs, laptops, and iphones when if the world had been frozen in 1954, they would be writing with fountain pens on stationery and mailing letters rather than posting on a MB.
I think it is really more about using intact infrastructure that allows for choices in terms of modes of transportation and services versus going back in time. In a way, you can say that history repeats itself and what is old is made new again. There isn't anything new under the sun. So, it just may the trend or season we're in regarding this topic.
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Old 05-30-2014, 06:54 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,992 posts, read 42,070,148 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
Why don't we live in castles any more? The question posed by this thread and the responses to reflect most of the posters' ignorance of/disregard for the fact that we live in a universe in which everything changes constantly!!! Nothing is static and permanent.

America in 2014 isn't like it was in 1954 or 1894 or 1834 or 1764, so of course, "Main Street" isn't the same, either. More importantly, why is "Main Street", Smalltown USA circa 1954 worthy of all the nostalgia when most people back then were either for improving it or leaving it?
Because others don't think they're obsolete and something worth keeping. It's hard for very small town's main street areas to do well, larger towns sometimes do okay. The old main street areas of towns are what make them interesting places, the rather generic strip centers built are bland. They look like garbage IMO.
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Old 05-30-2014, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Because others don't think they're obsolete and something worth keeping. It's hard for very small town's main street areas to do well, larger towns sometimes do okay. The old main street areas of towns are what make them interesting places, the rather generic strip centers built are bland. They look like garbage IMO.
In many ways, these little downtowns are obsolete. The ones that have thrived aren't selling the kind of goods one could buy in a small downtown in 1954. They're selling flowers, restaurant meals, professional services (lawyers, doctors, etc), coffee, antiques, etc. Back in 1954, which is vaguely within in my memory, little downtowns sold clothes, shoes, jewelry and the like, items one now gets at the mall or "lifestyle center".
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Old 05-30-2014, 08:09 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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That's why I said downtowns of larger downtowns. The downtown where I live has several shoe stores and a jewelry stores. There's nothing really outdated at it. Anyway, they're not obsolete in the sense a typewriter is obsolete, which is superseded by a more useful product. Retail may change, but they can be functional
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Old 06-15-2014, 09:33 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
Greenfield MA is looking a lot better than it was when I lived near there about 8 years go
Farmer's Market, Greenfield.

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Old 06-15-2014, 10:45 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
In many ways, these little downtowns are obsolete. The ones that have thrived aren't selling the kind of goods one could buy in a small downtown in 1954. They're selling flowers, restaurant meals, professional services (lawyers, doctors, etc), coffee, antiques, etc. Back in 1954, which is vaguely within in my memory, little downtowns sold clothes, shoes, jewelry and the like, items one now gets at the mall or "lifestyle center".
Neighborhood Main Streets are just evolving and in some cities still thriving and growing.
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