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Old 05-08-2014, 01:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
That area of NJ has a lot of former industrial towns and cities - I thought the Oranges were among them?
Only Orange itself and small parts of West Orange were industrial. Now both Orange and East Orange are poor and both have (adjacent) main streets which mainly serve local needs. Exactly what nostalgic urbanists often ask for, probably not what they want.
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Old 05-08-2014, 01:18 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,016 posts, read 102,634,943 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I definitely think that back in the main street days, we had a lot more neighborly connections. I went over to another main street, on a town near my dad's town, and many of the people there knew my grandparents as well. A distant cousin of my dad's was running the restaurant on main street.



We still have plenty of main streets in Oakland. I've got 4 thriving ones in my 3 mile radius of Oakland (no big box stores on any, they have small form factor groceries). But I was thinking more about small towner, than larger places or inner ring suburbs.
It is not unusual for me to go to Kohl's, the grocery store, the mall, Target or even (gasp!) Walmart and run into people I know.
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Old 05-08-2014, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Only Orange itself and small parts of West Orange were industrial. Now both Orange and East Orange are poor and both have (adjacent) main streets which mainly serve local needs. Exactly what nostalgic urbanists often ask for, probably not what they want.
I disagree. Who are these mystery urbanist a who think that only high end main streets count? Neighborhood serving is key, not all areas have the same needs.
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Old 05-08-2014, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It is not unusual for me to go to Kohl's, the grocery store, the mall, Target or even (gasp!) Walmart and run into people I know.
I think it is harder to run into people you know if the feeder area for the store is huge. I run into people often but it is a function of a short feeder distance and common interests.
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Old 05-08-2014, 01:45 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I think it is harder to run into people you know if the feeder area for the store is huge. I run into people often but it is a function of a short feeder distance and common interests.
I daresay that's the same for most people. Even at the local mall, I often see people I know, and our mall is about 8 miles away and pretty big, considered a "regional" mall. (Flatiron Crossing) Flatiron Crossing Mall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 05-08-2014, 01:48 PM
 
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Main Street worked when we were a nation of 50-60 million people. Now, as a nation of 300 million, we don't fit on Main Street any longer.

Malls are a disgusting fact of life. Thankfully, they are being replaced by the internet, and people can go back to Main Street to browse, shop and socialize.
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Old 05-08-2014, 01:50 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I disagree. Who are these mystery urbanist a who think that only high end main streets count? Neighborhood serving is key, not all areas have the same needs.
I'll go out on a limb here. There's an overall sense on this forum that main streets should provide "interesting" and "unique" shopping opportunities. There are a few neighborhood main streets in Denver that do just that, have over-priced restaurants (all of which my daughter seems to have been to), odd-ball stores like costume stores open year round, stores my DH calls "trinket shops", etc.
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Old 05-08-2014, 01:59 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,990 posts, read 41,998,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I'll go out on a limb here. There's an overall sense on this forum that main streets should provide "interesting" and "unique" shopping opportunities. There are a few neighborhood main streets in Denver that do just that, have over-priced restaurants (all of which my daughter seems to have been to), odd-ball stores like costume stores open year round, stores my DH calls "trinket shops", etc.
I'm not sure that's why Main Streets are valued. Main Streets are interesting to me for the built envirnoment they provide not specifically for the type of stores. Speaking for myself, the reason I value Main Streets are:

1) Usually more pedestrians than other spots. They don't feel dead.
2) Historic, or at least interesting architecture and buildings
3) Generally nicer from a pedestrian perspective in the way stores are situation, and have nicer crosswalks.

Perhaps there are other "urbanist" posters with a different view, but at least on this thread there hasn't been posters who are looking unique / boutique style Main Streets. I find it interesting that neighborhood main streets are specifically oriented towards the "unique" stores rather than practical, I've only found that in suburban or small town Main Streets. This Long Island one is a good example:

https://maps.google.com/maps?q=north...,57.45,,0,8.46

I like visiting it though, mainly for its harbor setting.
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Old 05-08-2014, 02:07 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^That place looks neat.

Here's what Boulder has, that is very "unique", "interesting" and many other adjectives. You can't buy a pair of jeans or shoes there, though. It does have a nice book store, and some athletic clothing shops where I shop for my daughters. Lots of restaurants.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Pe...fb917a!6m1!1e1
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Pe...fb917a!6m1!1e1
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Pe...fb917a!6m1!1e1
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Old 05-08-2014, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,171 posts, read 29,686,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I daresay that's the same for most people. Even at the local mall, I often see people I know, and our mall is about 8 miles away and pretty big, considered a "regional" mall. (Flatiron Crossing) Flatiron Crossing Mall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I generally see people I know, in my 3-4 mile radius of home (it has some cross over with my college too, so that adds extra people) or when I travel to SF (since it is a regional draw of course).

But pretty much when I travel to other nearby cities, I never see anyone I know. I can count those experiences on 1-2 hands. For example, 20% of my coworkers live in the town we work. 10% live in the places directly adjacent. 30% live in San Francisco. And the rest of us are scattered in other places more than 10 miles away. Not likely to run into any of them outside of work other than the SF people, and the other Oakland person (who lives in my 3 mile radius).
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