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Old 05-10-2014, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
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Saw this awesome video about Lakewood OH. Apparently schools were placed so they didn't need to provide buses. Everyone is in walking distance. They save a million dollars a year on transit costs since they don't need to provide buses.

How One Suburb Made School Buses Obsolete - Sarah Goodyear - The Atlantic Cities

And it builds community.

Look at that, it is a walkable suburb!
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Old 05-10-2014, 11:05 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
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That is a pretty smart thing to do. This should be common with most Elementary and Junior High schools.
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Old 05-10-2014, 11:06 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Saw this awesome video about Lakewood OH. Apparently schools were placed so they didn't need to provide buses. Everyone is in walking distance. They save a million dollars a year on transit costs since they don't need to provide buses.

How One Suburb Made School Buses Obsolete - Sarah Goodyear - The Atlantic Cities

And it builds community.

Look at that, it is a walkable suburb!
I wonder how many actually do walk or bike to school? My school committee did a little observation, and even at "neighborhood schools" with no transportation provided by the school, few walk, most are driven.

And walkable suburbs are everywhere.
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Old 05-11-2014, 12:17 AM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,096,962 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post

And walkable suburbs are everywhere.
The exception, not the rule
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Old 05-11-2014, 02:07 AM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I wonder how many actually do walk or bike to school? My school committee did a little observation, and even at "neighborhood schools" with no transportation provided by the school, few walk, most are driven.
I thought walking to school was the only way people got their, until my family moved. I thought it was weird not to walk. When I lived in walking distance most everyone walked. But that was a different time I guess.

Quote:
And walkable suburbs are everywhere.
I have never said they weren't, but plenty of people are under the impression walkability is limited to urban areas only. Turn over to any recent thread, and there is a comment about that.
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Old 05-11-2014, 06:41 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I wonder how many actually do walk or bike to school? My school committee did a little observation, and even at "neighborhood schools" with no transportation provided by the school, few walk, most are driven.
That wasn't true at my school, at least for the older students (say grades 8-10). More so afternoon, as parents are less likely to be home.
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Old 05-11-2014, 07:30 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I thought walking to school was the only way people got their, until my family moved. I thought it was weird not to walk. When I lived in walking distance most everyone walked. But that was a different time I guess.



I have never said they weren't, but plenty of people are under the impression walkability is limited to urban areas only. Turn over to any recent thread, and there is a comment about that.
When I lived within walking distance, everybody, 100% walked. Many families only had one car at the time, and the Dad took it to work. But yeah, times have changed.

I agree that almost every recent thread, and I'll add, most of the old ones too, have comments about non-walkable suburbs. Yes, there are plenty of walkable burbs.
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Old 05-11-2014, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,893 posts, read 7,653,336 times
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Unfortunately, the state of Ohio tries to consolidate neighborhood schools whenever possible. The state believes it's more cost-effective to build, maintain, and operate a smaller number of larger buildings, than a larger number of smaller buildings.
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Old 05-11-2014, 08:08 AM
 
56,515 posts, read 80,824,285 times
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I think what helps Lakewood is that with many former streetcar suburbs, they are essentially an extension of the center city fabric in terms of built environment.

Also, the claim of being the most dense municipality between NYC and Chicago isn't correct. I know that Kenmore, NY next to Buffalo has around 15,000 people within 1.4 square miles and there may be some others in say NJ that have a higher density.
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Old 05-11-2014, 08:19 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JR_C View Post
Unfortunately, the state of Ohio tries to consolidate neighborhood schools whenever possible. The state believes it's more cost-effective to build, maintain, and operate a smaller number of larger buildings, than a larger number of smaller buildings.
Having worked with (not for) the schools for many years, that is actually true. Each building first needs to be built to the tune of millions of dollars. Then they all need to be staffed. Each building needs a principal.That's what costs the big bucks in schools, personnel. It's harder to be flexible with class assignments in a small, 1-2 round per grade level school than in a larger one. Many issues here.
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