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Old 05-20-2014, 07:19 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
They also don't want to live in downtowns. We Americans are the descendents, at least intellectually, of people who traveled half way around the world in order to own their own piece of ground, not to crowd together in rented hovels like back in "the old country". That so many immigrants never achieved that dream didn't mean that the dream died ... especially for their children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, etc.
That's a big a stretch. Obviously immigrants didn't dream of living in substandard housing, but avoiding dense housing just for its own sake? Tastes change with time and circumstance, the aspirations of Americans 100 years ago was rather different.

As for immigrant dreams, living in the apartment buildings flanking the Grand Concourse in The Bronx, was considered a prestigious place for the children of Jewish immigrants back in the 20s and 30s. It's not anymore, but choices and the culture was different back then.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/21/ar...anted=all&_r=0
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Old 05-20-2014, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,166 posts, read 29,665,044 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
They also don't want to live in downtowns. We Americans are the descendents, at least intellectually, of people who traveled half way around the world in order to own their own piece of ground, not to crowd together in rented hovels like back in "the old country". That so many immigrants never achieved that dream didn't mean that the dream died ... especially for their children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, etc.
I don't want that lifestyle. I'd rather live downtown. Or in an area like the one I live near downtown with a vibrant main street and diversity in age, ethnicity, occupation and income.

Downtown Oakland is probably a big exception to the "downtown rules" It is nowhere near the most dangerous neighborhood in the city. It is actually middle of the pack, to be honest, about half of downtown I feel totally fine walking around alone in late at night. All is fine in a pair. There are a few characters on a few streets, but typically non-threatening. Biking at night is no big deal (assuming I've parked on a busy street). I've biked home after 10. But East Oakland flatlands? You wouldn't catch me there after dark.

Parking? Not a huge issue other than on the busy night life street or first fridays. You'll find a spot within 2-3 blocks almost every time. The paid lots are only popular when there is a concert at the Fox of Paramount or on First Friday, but if you get there before 6 or 6:30, you can easily find street parking right in the heart of the activity.
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:27 PM
 
56,607 posts, read 80,890,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
I am a big fan of multigenerational neighborhoods. I noticed tremendous diversity in age when I visited Victoria BC.
I think people underestimate the interest of Downtown living by empty nesters. For instance, there was a Downtown Living Tour here in Syracuse this past Saturday that attracted people of various ages that may be interested in living in Downtown, as well as those that are just there to see what is going on. So, there is an interest in urban living by some older folks as well.
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Old 05-21-2014, 06:26 AM
 
273 posts, read 261,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
They also don't want to live in downtowns. We Americans are the descendents, at least intellectually, of people who traveled half way around the world in order to own their own piece of ground, not to crowd together in rented hovels like back in "the old country". That so many immigrants never achieved that dream didn't mean that the dream died ... especially for their children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, etc.
BS. Canadians and Australians are the descendants of the very same Europeans, but we have no problem living in dense areas.

Your reasoning is flimsy.
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Old 05-21-2014, 08:18 AM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,349,928 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
That's a big a stretch. Obviously immigrants didn't dream of living in substandard housing, but avoiding dense housing just for its own sake?
As opposed to seeking dense housing just for the sake of density?
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Old 05-21-2014, 08:39 AM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
3,067 posts, read 2,107,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Most school districts have policies against advertising for businesses.
Pure advertising is one thing, but you have to think mutually beneficial promotions could be arranged. When I was in kindergarten, I would be awarded a free personal pan pizza from Pizza Hut after reading, I don't know, 5 picture books or something. That sort of thing...but with downtown businesses rather than seemingly exclusively suburban Pizza Hut (obviously I'm not the person you were responding to, but I support his idea in principle)
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Old 05-21-2014, 08:40 AM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
NYC is why I included "midrise" in my point. Manhattan itself only has a handful of single-family houses left at the far north of the island, but there's plenty of places less structurally dense than Midtown which are far more desirable if you have a family.

But yes, in general virtually anywhere outside of a CBD offers some green space. To use Pittsburgh examples, why live in the CBD in a place like this when you could live here, here, or even here and still be within city limits?
Old Google Maps > New Google Maps (and I realize you can switch back)
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Old 05-21-2014, 10:42 AM
 
1,709 posts, read 1,674,551 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
As opposed to seeking dense housing just for the sake of density?
I don't think people seek density for density's sake. They seek why density has to offer-shorter distances. Shorter distances to work, shorter distances between people, shorter distances to restaurants and amenities, etc.
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Old 05-21-2014, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,750,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
"Those who forget the past. . . "
Quotes About Doomed To Repeat It (15 quotes)



I've read fluff articles like that about cities in the US as well, but the fact is most people "retire in place".
http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/15/bu...lace.html?_r=0
**Mr. Frey said that where someone was at age 45 was the best predictor of where he or she would retire. **

Mr. Frey is a demographer for the Brookings Institution.
This is a fluff piece only in the fact that it's not hard hitting journalism. It is not a fluff piece in the sense that it is short on facts. 30 percent of the population living in Downtown Vancouver are seniors. That is NOT a small number.
So what does Vancouver's downtown have to attract and keep them? The article I linked states it quite clearly.
Whether or not the majority retire " in place " or not, is not what's important here. The point I made, is that seniors do and can play a part in the vibrancy of downtown neighbourhoods.
That is the reality of Vancouver's downtown, regardless of what one demographer says about seniors in general.

Last edited by Natnasci; 05-21-2014 at 12:59 PM..
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Old 05-21-2014, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,685 posts, read 8,750,439 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda_d View Post
They also don't want to live in downtowns. We Americans are the descendents, at least intellectually, of people who traveled half way around the world in order to own their own piece of ground, not to crowd together in rented hovels like back in "the old country". That so many immigrants never achieved that dream didn't mean that the dream died ... especially for their children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, etc.
Wow. I never knew housing wants were genetic.
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