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Old 05-21-2014, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,680 posts, read 8,743,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I don't want that lifestyle. I'd rather live downtown. Or in an area like the one I live near downtown with a vibrant main street and diversity in age, ethnicity, occupation and income.

Downtown Oakland is probably a big exception to the "downtown rules" It is nowhere near the most dangerous neighborhood in the city. It is actually middle of the pack, to be honest, about half of downtown I feel totally fine walking around alone in late at night. All is fine in a pair. There are a few characters on a few streets, but typically non-threatening. Biking at night is no big deal (assuming I've parked on a busy street). I've biked home after 10. But East Oakland flatlands? You wouldn't catch me there after dark.

Parking? Not a huge issue other than on the busy night life street or first fridays. You'll find a spot within 2-3 blocks almost every time. The paid lots are only popular when there is a concert at the Fox of Paramount or on First Friday, but if you get there before 6 or 6:30, you can easily find street parking right in the heart of the activity.
Parking is an infrastructure issue, that can be solved by making developers build underground parking for all new builds, residential and commercial. I've been to Oakland years ago and remember the Merritt Lake area as being quite nice. I don't know if Oakland has restrictions on underground parking lots??
In Vancouver's west end, a lot of the older buildings have lots, but at street level, a few underground, and some with no parking at all, so parking permits are issued for residents and finding parking on the street can be a pain. However the new downtown neighbourhoods of Yaletown and Coal Harbour all have underground lots for residents, which eases up the street parking and enables the city to meter those sites and get revenue that would be lost if residents had to park on the streets.

Last edited by Natnasci; 05-21-2014 at 01:00 PM..
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Old 05-21-2014, 01:08 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,986 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Parking is an infrastructure issue, that can be solve by making developers build underground parking for all new builds, residential and commercial. I've been to Oakland years ago and remember the Merritt Lake area as being quite nice. I don't know if Oakland has restrictions on underground parking lots??
In Vancouver's west end, a lot of the older buildings have lots, but at street level, a few underground, and some with no parking at all, so parking permits are issued for residents and finding parking on the street can be a pain. However the new downtown neighbourhoods of Yaletown and Coal Harbour all have underground lots for residents, which eases up the street parking and enables the city to meter those sites and get revenue that would be lost if residents had to park on the streets.
Parking requirements would only make much difference if the downtown area is mostly new, like Vancouver but unlike older eastern US cities. Underground parking is also expensive, and adds to the cost of the structure, which is on to the residences/tenants. Surface parking is cheaper, but it takes up valuable space in a downtown area and can often be a bit unsightly. I doubt Oakland would have restrictions on underground parking lots, it may not require them in the downtown area though. I know Manhattan does restrict new underground parking and new parking in general.
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Old 05-21-2014, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,680 posts, read 8,743,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Parking requirements would only make much difference if the downtown area is mostly new, like Vancouver but unlike older eastern US cities. Underground parking is also expensive, and adds to the cost of the structure, which is on to the residences/tenants. Surface parking is cheaper, but it takes up valuable space in a downtown area and can often be a bit unsightly. I doubt Oakland would have restrictions on underground parking lots, it may not require them in the downtown area though. I know Manhattan does restrict new underground parking and new parking in general.
I can see it begin an issue for older eastern cities, but what the rest of the U.S.? Are there any older eastern cities where the downtown is so dire, that non-heritage buildings, could be torn down and new ones built with underground parking? Or perhaps this is an opportunity for those cities to creative and build parkades that are not unsightly. Although underground parking in your building of residence is preferred. Also the "newer" parts of downtown Vancouver did have buildings on them. They were either torn down or re-purposed, mind you in old industrial areas.
I remember seeing some fantastic public lots in Lyon.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ucLUrTMwznc

Last edited by Natnasci; 05-21-2014 at 02:09 PM..
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Old 05-21-2014, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,655,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
Parking is an infrastructure issue, that can be solved by making developers build underground parking for all new builds, residential and commercial. I've been to Oakland years ago and remember the Merritt Lake area as being quite nice. I don't know if Oakland has restrictions on underground parking lots??
Good memory, the Lake Merritt area is very popular, and recently completed most of some new street beautification projects and stuff. It is better than it was a few years ago! (And then it was nice as well)

And some of the areas that were "dead zones" between downtown and the Grand Lake area are filling in too. In a couple more years, the whole area will be activated on the north side of the Lake. The South East side could use a little bit of work, but a BRT line is on the way, and the plan is "gentrification without displacement" as there is a thriving Southeast Asian community in the area.

Quote:
In Vancouver's west end, a lot of the older buildings have lots, but at street level, a few underground, and some with no parking at all, so parking permits are issued for residents and finding parking on the street can be a pain. However the new downtown neighbourhoods of Yaletown and Coal Harbour all have underground lots for residents, which eases up the street parking and enables the city to meter those sites and get revenue that would be lost if residents had to park on the streets.
DTO (the abbreviation) has a lot of surface lots and free standing garages, many with underground parking too. Not many buildings have underground parking though. There are just multistory garages mostly. Few places have lots too. DTO has loads of older buildings (pre-auto era). Then some of course were lost to parking garages. The streets are mostly metered too. The new residences have underground lots or first floor lots depending on the building. I don't know what the parking regulations are, but the city is well aware of the parking surplus. A few of the new boutique condo buildings have just worked out deals with the garages to provide parking, and the buildings in chinatown have shared neighborhood garages.


Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Parking requirements would only make much difference if the downtown area is mostly new, like Vancouver but unlike older eastern US cities. Underground parking is also expensive, and adds to the cost of the structure, which is on to the residences/tenants. Surface parking is cheaper, but it takes up valuable space in a downtown area and can often be a bit unsightly. I doubt Oakland would have restrictions on underground parking lots, it may not require them in the downtown area though. I know Manhattan does restrict new underground parking and new parking in general.
I don't think it is generally required, but Oakland is also working on bringing more TOD type things too. Buildings have parking, but there is also some vision for parking management too.
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Old 05-21-2014, 04:48 PM
 
56,564 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post
I can see it begin an issue for older eastern cities, but what the rest of the U.S.? Are there any older eastern cities where the downtown is so dire, that non-heritage buildings, could be torn down and new ones built with underground parking? Or perhaps this is an opportunity for those cities to creative and build parkades that are not unsightly. Although underground parking in your building of residence is preferred. Also the "newer" parts of downtown Vancouver did have buildings on them. They were either torn down or re-purposed, mind you in old industrial areas.
I remember seeing some fantastic public lots in Lyon.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ucLUrTMwznc
This could possibly be done in "Rust Belt" cities in the states, but you may have to consider site contamination as well. Just to use a local example, there is underground parking at DestinyUSA mall, which was built on a former industry site called Oil City. Destiny USA - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 05-21-2014, 04:53 PM
 
56,564 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I think people underestimate the interest of Downtown living by empty nesters. For instance, there was a Downtown Living Tour here in Syracuse this past Saturday that attracted people of various ages that may be interested in living in Downtown, as well as those that are just there to see what is going on. So, there is an interest in urban living by some older folks as well.
Here is some information on the Living Tour: Downtown Digs on Display at Tomorrow’s Living Tour
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Old 05-21-2014, 06:08 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,990 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Marcinkiewicz View Post
Pure advertising is one thing, but you have to think mutually beneficial promotions could be arranged. When I was in kindergarten, I would be awarded a free personal pan pizza from Pizza Hut after reading, I don't know, 5 picture books or something. That sort of thing...but with downtown businesses rather than seemingly exclusively suburban Pizza Hut (obviously I'm not the person you were responding to, but I support his idea in principle)
Based on my personal experiences having two kids going through K-12 and much experience observing/studying/ the local schools for a group I belong to, I can tell you this much:

Schools have cracked down a lot on general advertising. The previous poster was suggesting businesses get the schools to send home flyers about "kids eat free" nights and the like. Most schools would not do that. If the downtown businesses wanted to do as Pizza Hut did above, that would probably be acceptable. I could just see it in Denver, all the marijuana dispensaries offering free coupons for reading a certain # of books, LOL!
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Old 05-21-2014, 06:33 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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I was a bit puzzled how on earth the topic of advertising in schools got on a thread called "what are downtowns missing". Then read the conversation and found all the jumps.
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Old 05-21-2014, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,680 posts, read 8,743,773 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
This could possibly be done in "Rust Belt" cities in the states, but you may have to consider site contamination as well. Just to use a local example, there is underground parking at DestinyUSA mall, which was built on a former industry site called Oil City. Destiny USA - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Couldn't those developers of those sites seek remediation? This article is 9 years old, and I'm not sure how things are now, but it looks like a developer can recover clean up costs. Every jurisdiction will probably be different, and it could be an issue if the contaminator is no longer in business, or the site is so old that the ability to recover costs has passed.

Real Estate Developer Recovers 90% Clean-up Costs From Previous Owners | Insurable Interest, May 6, 2005 | Clark Wilson LLP
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Old 05-21-2014, 08:50 PM
 
Location: Old East Dallas
297 posts, read 403,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
I'd say parking needs to be priced appropriately. And well signed. You don't have to have cheap parking. I think prices should be variable, and you should know where to go to get cheaper spaces due to signage. But too much parking kills the dynamism of a neighborhood.
It should be cheap or FREE.

As for "too much parking", I believe I said somewhere, that "cars are for freeways"
and that people should Walk or ride a bicycle or take public transportation if under
5 miles.


Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Hilarious video !
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