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Old 05-16-2014, 09:25 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,152,919 times
Reputation: 7738

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
It helps if the premise fits your biases.
I honestly have no real bias one way or another just that understanding the data that went into is the merits for interpretation

honestly if there is anyone with biases in this regard based on reading this thread a mirror might be suggested
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Old 05-16-2014, 09:50 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,728,729 times
Reputation: 30796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
As far as I'm concerned, the article did not prove its hypothesis. It gave zero stats. And to say the National Trust for Historic Preservation has an agenda is an understatement.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
"National Trust President Stephanie Meeks said the group hopes developers and city planners will consider the data."

A little hard to build it that way. Just what is she proposing? It's hard to tell since there are NO hard stats in that article. We're just supposed to believe them.
Maybe the article was short on stats and scientific data because it is a newspaper article, not a dissertation in a scientific journal.

Fortunately, the author of the newspaper article linked to the study, along with all the data, that the article is based on: http://www.preservationnation.org/in...smallerbetter/
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Old 05-16-2014, 10:53 AM
 
9,520 posts, read 14,823,688 times
Reputation: 9769
In other news, a study by the Beef Industry Council finds steak tastes great and is good for you.
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Old 05-16-2014, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,975 posts, read 4,079,459 times
Reputation: 1208
"Neighborhoods and commercial areas with a mix of older, smaller buildings make for more vibrant, walkable communities with more businesses, nightlife and cultural outlets than massive newer buildings, according the National Trust for Historic Preservation's study."

Kind of a subjective personal anecdote here: compare South Beach vs. Brickell in Miami. While Brickell has definitely stolen a lot of limelight from South Beach recently, I find South Beach much more walkable, bikeable, and generally vibrant than Brickell. The recent trend in South Beach has been to renovate older buildings (I live in a fully updated 1920's art deco building), while Brickell is full of new mega-towers. The thing with Brickell is that those massive luxury-oriented buildings (almost) all come with large parking structures. They tend to cater to wealthy folk who have nice cars and prefer to drive them around. (Though you do get lots of students and young professionals with roommates who don't drive everywhere). When walking and ESPECIALLY biking around South Beach, I feel I am in good company and don't get many funny looks, whereas in Brickell I often feel that unless I'm commuting to/from work on public transportation or walking from the garage to the bar, I should rather be in one of those cars. Comparing Washington Avenue with the trickle of pedestrians on Brickell Avenue and Miami Avenue and virtual lack of cyclists and parked, locked-up bikes on a typical evening, it is easy to see I am not alone. OK, South Beach has many tourists, BUT quite a few of those massive buildings in Brickell are hotels too, and Brickell has the greater residential density. Also, not many of the tourists bring their bikes with them or rent bikes, they walk or take cabs...
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Old 05-16-2014, 01:51 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,193,822 times
Reputation: 3351
Another urban planning thread derailed by bickering.
It is actually possible to discuss ideas and concepts without statistics.

And IF you NEED statistics, try goggle.

As per the last post on Miami, it is actually possible to OBSERVE the idea being discussed, in the real world.
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Old 05-16-2014, 01:55 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
Can one trust ones own observations? I prefer seeing lots of numbers.
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Old 05-16-2014, 02:02 PM
 
2,493 posts, read 2,193,822 times
Reputation: 3351
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Can one trust ones own observations? I prefer seeing lots of numbers.
I can.
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Old 05-16-2014, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,074,613 times
Reputation: 12636
Quote:
Originally Posted by hurricaneMan1992 View Post
"Neighborhoods and commercial areas with a mix of older, smaller buildings make for more vibrant, walkable communities with more businesses, nightlife and cultural outlets than massive newer buildings, according the National Trust for Historic Preservation's study."
* per square foot.

They kind of bury that in there so you have to really read the article.
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Old 05-16-2014, 02:21 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Can one trust ones own observations? I prefer seeing lots of numbers.
I do too. I've been a maternal/child nurse long enough to know there's no such thing as "common sense". Common sense doesn't tell you much of anything. Common sense isn't very common.
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Old 05-16-2014, 02:28 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Another urban planning thread derailed by bickering.
It is actually possible to discuss ideas and concepts without statistics.

And IF you NEED statistics, try goggle.

As per the last post on Miami, it is actually possible to OBSERVE the idea being discussed, in the real world.
Allow me to point out that the bickering at me continued well past my participation in it!

As for the post on Miami, the plural of anecdote isn't data. Do you recall the story of the blind men and the elephant?

John Godfrey Saxe: The Blind Men and the Elephant

We all "feel" in our own way. Someone has to put it all together.
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