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Old 05-17-2014, 10:44 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
can't see, but the interior is crumbling in parts. Opposite is a similar building that is fine shape, probably because it was never left to decay:
It's quite possible and sometimes practical to rehabilitate shells like those; unlike wooden buildings the structural elements remain even after the roof and windows are gone, even gone for years, so basically you can build a new interior inside the shell. A lot of times there isn't any practical use for such a huge building, though; there's only a market for so many loft apartments...

(There's also often toxic waste issues with old industrial buildings)
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Old 05-17-2014, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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Originally Posted by cmontesi View Post
That's a terrible misconception as to why smaller buildings exist as opposed to new development.
Even I'll go into your argument for smaller older buildings. There is less of a exposure in smaller buildings than huge retails. What attracts the most to future buyers? The prospect to have diversity within a single volumetric space.
And there is something very important you're forgetting. ZONING. Huge retail centers/businesses will be within a certain zone. And that zone will be in that very same space where smaller buildings still stand. As a result, the "newer buildings offer huge retail space with less variety of shops" is not only wrong but is the exact opposite.
Bigger newer buildings offer a safer, cleaner environment that is an eye candy. That's why most people will go there instead. Because in psychological terms, we are attracted to beautiful things.
I honestly couldn't understand anything you were saying. Your grammar escapes me...
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Old 05-17-2014, 03:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by cmontesi View Post
Bigger newer buildings offer a safer, cleaner environment that is an eye candy. That's why most people will go there instead. Because in psychological terms, we are attracted to beautiful things.
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder though. A new building may be beautiful to you but not so much to others. Although in contrast to my first sentence, I will argue that most people prefer older architecture (mostly 1880-1940 architecture) over most modern buildings. Shiny glass blocks have nothing on the opulent patterns of terra cotta, stone, and brick of the Victorian Era.
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Old 05-17-2014, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder though. A new building may be beautiful to you but not so much to others. Although in contrast to my first sentence, I will argue that most people prefer older architecture (mostly 1880-1940 architecture) over most modern buildings. Shiny glass blocks have nothing on the opulent patterns of terra cotta, stone, and brick of the Victorian Era.
Certainly here. In reality, I don't really know. A lot of modern architecture buildings aren't particularly interesting. For example, all the Amazon buildings in South Lake Union are all very boring to me. Others are not. I really like Seattle Central Library. I also like Smith Tower and Freeway Park. I don't, however, much care for row houses.
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Old 05-17-2014, 06:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Certainly here. In reality, I don't really know. A lot of modern architecture buildings aren't particularly interesting. For example, all the Amazon buildings in South Lake Union are all very boring to me. Others are not. I really like Seattle Central Library. I also like Smith Tower and Freeway Park. I don't, however, much care for row houses.
I agree entirely. Older, historic architecture, and even modern replicas of it, have a unique charm in the smaller structures, and an impression of grandeur in the larger ones. Contemporary architecture seems too blocky, plain, and bland.
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Old 05-17-2014, 07:00 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
I agree entirely. Older, historic architecture, and even modern replicas of it, have a unique charm in the smaller structures, and an impression of grandeur in the larger ones. Contemporary architecture seems too blocky, plain, and bland.
LOL! I'm actually no fan of contemporary architecture myself. However, I can remember when my parents referred to the 50s houses as "crackerboxes", and now people are falling all over themselves about how fabulous "mid-century modern" is.
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Old 05-17-2014, 07:30 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
LOL! I'm actually no fan of contemporary architecture myself. However, I can remember when my parents referred to the 50s houses as "crackerboxes", and now people are falling all over themselves about how fabulous "mid-century modern" is.
That trend hasn't reached here yet. Though New England liked its mid century houses to be imitation colonials, though cheaper ones are ranch houses.
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Old 05-17-2014, 08:18 PM
 
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Of course "mid-century modern" and 1950's "crackerbox" are rarely referring to the same thing.
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Old 05-17-2014, 08:34 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Originally Posted by Eddyline View Post
Of course "mid-century modern" and 1950's "crackerbox" are rarely referring to the same thing.
In some cases, yes they are. milehimodern: the coolest homes in denver. See especially the section on Harvey Park and its pre-fans. In any event, it's not the cozy look of the Victorians.
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Old 05-17-2014, 08:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
In some cases, yes they are. milehimodern: the coolest homes in denver. See especially the section on Harvey Park and its pre-fans. In any event, it's not the cozy look of the Victorians.
And who is referring to the Harvey Park mid-century modern homes as "crackerboxes"?
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