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Old 05-15-2014, 06:33 PM
 
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Well- I guess the preservationists are correct about keeping historic buildings and architecture around.

Study: Older, smaller buildings better for cities

Last edited by phoenixmike11; 05-15-2014 at 06:33 PM.. Reason: typos
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Old 05-15-2014, 07:08 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,988 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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"National Trust President Stephanie Meeks said the group hopes developers and city planners will consider the data."

A little hard to build it that way. Just what is she proposing? It's hard to tell since there are NO hard stats in that article. We're just supposed to believe them.
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Old 05-15-2014, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,893 posts, read 7,654,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
"National Trust President Stephanie Meeks said the group hopes developers and city planners will consider the data."

A little hard to build it that way. Just what is she proposing? It's hard to tell since there are NO hard stats in that article. We're just supposed to believe them.
Instead of tearing down a group of smaller older buildings to build one big building, she's suggesting that it would be a better idea to renovate those smaller buildings.
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Old 05-15-2014, 07:33 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Yeah, I got that part, but how is a city to grow if older and smaller is "better"?
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Old 05-15-2014, 07:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Yeah, I got that part, but how is a city to grow if older and smaller is "better"?
Perhaps by understanding WHY the older and smaller buildings were better and applying that to new construction.
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Old 05-15-2014, 07:48 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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You can make new construction small, but you can't make it old.
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Old 05-15-2014, 07:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
You can make new construction small, but you can't make it old.
But you can figure out WHY the older building is better and adapt to new construction.
The actual age of the materials is only one of the reasons it is better.
Using quality materials, at the appropriate scale with good design can be done today.
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Old 05-15-2014, 08:05 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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As far as I'm concerned, the article did not prove its hypothesis. It gave zero stats. And to say the National Trust for Historic Preservation has an agenda is an understatement.
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Old 05-15-2014, 08:07 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,937,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
As far as I'm concerned, the article did not prove its hypothesis. It gave zero stats. And to say the National Trust for Historic Preservation has an agenda is an understatement.
It has some stats.
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Old 05-15-2014, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,893 posts, read 7,654,530 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Yeah, I got that part, but how is a city to grow if older and smaller is "better"?
If a developer plans to develop 50,000 square feet, renovating five 10,000 square foot buildings will produce better results than building one 50,000 square foot building. But, if 150,000 square feet are needed, then it might be better to replace those five smaller buildings, if it's absolutely necessary to stay at that location.
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