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Old 05-20-2014, 01:35 PM
 
854 posts, read 1,111,631 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hml1976 View Post
Burlington, VT is pretty walkable. So is Portland, ME.

I grew up in Toronto, it's not walkable. Most of Montreal isn't either except for right downtown and Old Montreal. Vancouver BC is somewhat walkable but no more than Seattle, but Calgary and Edmonton aren't at all. Quebec City is in the old section but it isn't much of a city. I really don't think there's any comparison here. NYC, Boston, Portland OR, and San Francisco are all more walkable than the big cities in Canada.
Portland is definitely not more walkable than Vancouver or Toronto. If you don't live downtown or in the immediate east you're definitely gonna need a car there. I agree with you that Toronto isn't really that walkable, however compared to any city in America aside from New York, SF and maybe Boston it is.
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Old 05-20-2014, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spicymeatball View Post
Portland is definitely not more walkable than Vancouver or Toronto. If you don't live downtown or in the immediate east you're definitely gonna need a car there. I agree with you that Toronto isn't really that walkable, however compared to any city in America aside from New York, SF and maybe Boston it is.
Portland, Oregon? The downtown area is nice and yes you can walk around it quite easily, but in the evenings it's dies down a lot.
Even so called restaurant row, isn't walkable from downtown.Walkability to me means being able to walk out your front door and walk to most everything you need. Downtown Portland doesn't come close to the amount of people who live downtown, compared to Vancouver, who can live, work and play and do fine without the need of a car.

Of course walkability becomes less the further away you get from downtown and hence density.

Last edited by Natnasci; 05-20-2014 at 02:30 PM..
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Old 05-20-2014, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Valdosta (Atlanta Native)
3,527 posts, read 3,070,266 times
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Simple Answer
Canadian Suburb
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Mi...f4c47291?hl=en
American Suburb
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ea...206edbb7?hl=en
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Old 05-20-2014, 03:40 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
plenty of American suburbs look like the first view.
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Old 05-20-2014, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Valdosta (Atlanta Native)
3,527 posts, read 3,070,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
plenty of American suburbs look like the first view.
But not all of them. And most don't have sidewalks. I can pretty much guarantee that all Canadian suburbs look like that.
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https://www.google.com/maps/place/Br...7cc38677?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@43.8387...34eQ!2e0?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ma...2cb23d63?hl=en
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Old 05-20-2014, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Murrieta California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
That is an absurd comparison.
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Old 05-20-2014, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Murrieta California
2,992 posts, read 3,744,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
But not all of them. And most don't have sidewalks. I can pretty much guarantee that all Canadian suburbs look like that.
Random Pen Drops
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Br...7cc38677?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@43.8387...34eQ!2e0?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ma...2cb23d63?hl=en
You obviously have not seen many US suburbs. Most have sidewalks.
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Old 05-20-2014, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,670 posts, read 8,740,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnSoCal View Post
You obviously have not seen many US suburbs. Most have sidewalks.
"Many places in the United States were built without sidewalks, particularly suburban areas in the decades following the Second World War."

Perils For Pedestrians - Retrofit Sidewalks

Anyway, I think his point is that there are more suburbs in the US that are less pedestrian friendly.

Here's a city data thread about one place in the US…how common is it? All I can say from the places I've been most have sidewalks….some don't. Friends who have travelled to Kanas City, can't remember if it was Kanas or Missouri, but mentioned the lack of sidewalks outside of town.

Sidewalks in Pittsburgh suburbs

Last edited by Natnasci; 05-20-2014 at 05:07 PM..
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Old 05-20-2014, 05:21 PM
 
104 posts, read 136,906 times
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What is the basis of the idea that Seattle is more walkable than Vancouver? If you use Pike Place Market as your starting point, just walking to other neighbourhoods (even a a place kinda close like Capitol Hill) and/or attractions (the two stadiums or Space Needle) is a real PITA.
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Old 05-20-2014, 05:34 PM
 
Location: sumter
8,546 posts, read 5,371,964 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
Good point. I like to use Vancouver B.C. versus Seattle in terms of their waterfronts as my example.

My girl always wondered why Vancouver B.C. has a downtown waterfront full of grassy parks whereas Seattle's waterfront has a bunch of cruise ship ports, railroad tracks, and industry. I explained that in Vancouver, having a more "livable" waterfront was the top priority as opposed to American cities like Seattle where making money is the top priority. The cruise ports and industry generates millions of dollars for Seattle so by American standards that takes priority over making the waterfront a pretty little park for grandmas to go jogging on. Seattle is redesigning its waterfront to make it more green and pedestrian friendly, yet still it will in no way interfere with the waterfront ports and industry because that's where the money is.
That's not the case in Chicago. They have a beautiful lake front with lots of green space, parks, beaches, and very walkable pedestrian friendly.
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