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Old 05-20-2014, 08:25 PM
 
104 posts, read 136,906 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HandsUpThumbsDown View Post
While Seattle doesn't win on an abundance of very high-density linear walkability radiating from the core, it does have some really excellent pedestrian planning, even in areas you wouldn't expect. I've never lived anywhere that I felt safer as a pedestrian.
Interesting comment. Do you have examples? It's not like I ever feel unsafe while in Seattle, I didn't think the pedestrian experience was particularly safer than my experiences in places like Portland or San Francisco.

It's not like I think Seattle isn't walkable. They have some really walkable neighbourhoods. I friggin' LOVE Ballard. But the neighbourhoods are kinda disconnected. I am not going to walk from Ballard to Queen Anne, for example.
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Old 05-20-2014, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
Good point. I like to use Vancouver B.C. versus Seattle in terms of their waterfronts as my example.

My girl always wondered why Vancouver B.C. has a downtown waterfront full of grassy parks whereas Seattle's waterfront has a bunch of cruise ship ports, railroad tracks, and industry. I explained that in Vancouver, having a more "livable" waterfront was the top priority as opposed to American cities like Seattle where making money is the top priority. The cruise ports and industry generates millions of dollars for Seattle so by American standards that takes priority over making the waterfront a pretty little park for grandmas to go jogging on. Seattle is redesigning its waterfront to make it more green and pedestrian friendly, yet still it will in no way interfere with the waterfront ports and industry because that's where the money is.
San Francisco's waterfront was covered by a freeway, and most is underutilized. In fact most of the waterfront in the entire Bay Area is used for commercial stuff and not a livable place. There are a plenty of places you wouldn't even realize have a waterfront, since it such a dead zone.
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Old 05-20-2014, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Valdosta (Atlanta Native)
3,527 posts, read 3,070,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnSoCal View Post
You obviously have not seen many US suburbs. Most have sidewalks.
I wouldn't say most. And anyway Canadian Suburban homes are closer than many American houses. And transit is better so people don't drive as much(though Go Train is expensive), and most children walk to school. Their neighborhoods are really neighborhoods, not random subdivisions. And yes, I do know many American Suburbs aren't like this, but most are.
Better Example- https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sm...c4f504a3?hl=en

Last edited by demonta4; 05-20-2014 at 09:11 PM..
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:15 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 15 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,981 posts, read 102,540,351 times
Reputation: 33045
Quote:
Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
But not all of them. And most don't have sidewalks. I can pretty much guarantee that all Canadian suburbs look like that.
Random Pen Drops
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Br...7cc38677?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/@43.8387...34eQ!2e0?hl=en
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ma...2cb23d63?hl=en
Please document and not with some cherry-picked pictures.
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Murrieta California
2,992 posts, read 3,744,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demonta4 View Post
I wouldn't say most. And anyway Canadian Suburban homes are closer than many American houses. And transit is better so people don't drive as much(though Go Train is expensive), and most children walk to school. Their neighborhoods are really neighborhoods, not random subdivisions. And yes, I do know many American Suburbs aren't like this, but most are.
Better Example- https://www.google.com/maps/place/Sm...c4f504a3?hl=en
Just how many different cities have you actually lived in?

I have lived in Vancouver BC, Victoria BC, Los Angeles CA, Seattle WA, Portland OR. Phoenix AZ, San Diego CA, San Jose CA, Sunnyvale CA, Los Gatos CA, Cupertino CA, Livermore, CA, Coral Springs FL, and Murrieta CA. We have owned 11 new homes in these cities so I have seen a lot of suburbs. Out of all of those areas only one of the suburbs did not have sidewalks.
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,650,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnSoCal View Post
Just how many different cities have you actually lived in?

I have lived in Vancouver BC, Victoria BC, Los Angeles CA, Seattle WA, Portland OR. Phoenix AZ, San Diego CA, San Jose CA, Sunnyvale CA, Los Gatos CA, Cupertino CA, Livermore, CA, Coral Springs FL, and Murrieta CA. We have owned 11 new homes in these cities so I have seen a lot of suburbs. Out of all of those areas only one of the suburbs did not have sidewalks.
Suburban areas (and rural areas) in the south tend to not have sidewalks. Where I lived in South Carolina, sidewalks were the exception not the norm. They didn't even put in sidewalks until phase 3 of our neighborhood, and none of the neighboring ones had sidewalks at all.
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Vancouver
12,670 posts, read 8,740,385 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
^^It's also up to the mod to chew out other posters.

I must say your link did not show any proof of its thesis statement, e.g., "Many places in the United States were built without sidewalks, particularly suburban areas in the decades following the Second World War." We are supposed to believe this like the Bible.
Considering many don't believe in the bible, I'm not sure I would term in that way

No, of course not. It's one statement from one site. I think though that it was referring to immediately after the war, many hastily put together subdivision etc needed to be built and housing was more important than sidewalks at that time, and most likely the sidewalks came later.
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Murrieta California
2,992 posts, read 3,744,409 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Suburban areas (and rural areas) in the south tend to not have sidewalks. Where I lived in South Carolina, sidewalks were the exception not the norm. They didn't even put in sidewalks until phase 3 of our neighborhood, and none of the neighboring ones had sidewalks at all.
That is interesting because the only Southern State we have lived in was Florida. That was the only place that didn't have sidewalks in our neighborhood. We lived in a pretty upscale area in Coral Springs FL which was a totally planned city done by Westinghouse back in the 70's and 80's.
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Old 05-20-2014, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,958 posts, read 3,816,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DowntownDenizen View Post
Vancouver's downtown waterfront used to be filled with industry and railyards too. Take a look at old aerials.

Vancouver decided to do away with all of that crap though cuz it's unattractive and does nothing to make the waterfront pleasant to walk through. You can have all that industry on your waterfront, but it doesn't have to be downtown. In Vancouver's case they moved it to the east side of the city. That kind of ugly crap has no place in a 21st century downtown anyways.

It's too bad Seattle doesn't want to move it's waterfront industry away from downtown. Move it all down to Tacoma or something.
On another forum, I had this discussion with some others about how the Port of Seattle should combine forces with Port of Tacoma and together construct a brand new state-of-the-art port down closer to Tacoma and move their operations southwards thereby allowing a rezone of all of that land into residential/office/retail.

This is all wishful thinking, however, as the Port of Seattle has no intention of moving out anytime soon. Port of Seattle generates 200,000 jobs and plans to expand that number to 300,000 jobs within the next few years. Port of Seattle also operates the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, which is conveniently right next to the port.

There was once a plan to rezone one of the piers near Seahawks Stadium and build a high density residential neighborhood on it. This plan was quickly quashed by Port of Seattle, as they were already the biggest opponents to the construction of the Stadium so close to their industry.
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Old 05-21-2014, 04:20 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,983 posts, read 41,929,314 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Suburban areas (and rural areas) in the south tend to not have sidewalks. Where I lived in South Carolina, sidewalks were the exception not the norm. They didn't even put in sidewalks until phase 3 of our neighborhood, and none of the neighboring ones had sidewalks at all.
It's common for at least residential streets in the Northeast to be sidewalkless in the Northeast, hard to say it's the majority. And from a streetview skim, parts of the Midwest. Likely these total to more people than the West, it's possible that a majority of suburbs are sidewalks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Natnasci View Post

No, of course not. It's one statement from one site. I think though that it was referring to immediately after the war, many hastily put together subdivision etc needed to be built and housing was more important than sidewalks at that time, and most likely the sidewalks came later.
Basing from Long Island, it seems like the neighborhoods built in the first decade immediately after WWII were a bit better at having sidewalks than those that came afterwards.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnSoCal View Post
That is interesting because the only Southern State we have lived in was Florida. That was the only place that didn't have sidewalks in our neighborhood. We lived in a pretty upscale area in Coral Springs FL which was a totally planned city done by Westinghouse back in the 70's and 80's.
As you as you listed Florida in those places, I guessed that was the one without sidewalks. The rest are all on the west coast.
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