U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 10-21-2014, 04:14 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,901,398 times
Reputation: 18049

Advertisements

Its really no different than now high can land cost go in cities and now do you service them .You don't parts get neglected while others get more because they bring in tax dollars. With boomers retiring and making up 26% of population even more rural areas can prosper and even draw young people to provide services thus creating jobs. many older smaller towns are booming again and boomers continue to retire for next 13 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-21-2014, 04:21 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,937,844 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
You are imagining "statements" that I did not make.
I said lots were getting smaller. That's not the same as claiming houses were getting smaller.
lots getting smaller is a regional pattern, there's not much change here, there's some trend in the West.

http://www.census.gov/const/C25Ann/malotsizesold.pdf

Though, new construction is less dominated by single family these days.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2014, 07:55 PM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,348,447 times
Reputation: 3030
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
lots getting smaller is a regional pattern, there's not much change here, there's some trend in the West.

http://www.census.gov/const/C25Ann/malotsizesold.pdf

Though, new construction is less dominated by single family these days.
1. a little slow on the uptake? My comment was over 2.5 months ago and made in response to someone that misrepresented my post

2. Don't know what to say about your numbers other than that they represent aggregates. There certainly has been noticeably shrinking lot size in metro areas in the southwest for newer homes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2014, 07:58 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,937,844 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
1. a little slow on the uptake? My comment was over 2.5 months ago and made in response to someone that misrepresented my post
This old thread was bumped, I saw the comment and thought real data would be useful and interesting, including to yourself.

Quote:
2. Don't know what to say about your numbers other than that they represent aggregates. Your chart appears to be determining statistics from all housing existing at that time, not just housing constructed that year. It's not as if the existing lots shrink (except in the case of "NU" developments replacing existing housing). There was a lot of inventory to prevent the average from moving down quickly, however, there certainly has been noticeably shrinking lot size in metro areas in the southwest for newer homes.
It's new housing not all housing. There's no way the median could fluctuate that much year to year from all housing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2014, 01:45 AM
 
2,824 posts, read 3,348,447 times
Reputation: 3030
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
This old thread was bumped, I saw the comment and thought real data would be useful and interesting, including to yourself.
From an armchair in another state .....
I know what I see on the ground here - and again your numbers are aggregates for large territories not particularly specific for any area within the territory.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
It's new housing not all housing. There's no way the median could fluctuate that much year to year from all housing.
I revised my statement pretty quickly after posting it and yours was 3 minutes later and using the old data - were you just waiting by to comment?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-22-2014, 04:51 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,985 posts, read 41,937,844 times
Reputation: 14804
Quote:
Originally Posted by IC_deLight View Post
From an armchair in another state .....
I know what I see on the ground here - and again your numbers are aggregates for large territories not particularly specific for any area within the territory.
aggregates give the big picture, your experience may not be typical. I didn't realize your posts were meant to be that local-specific.

Quote:
I revised my statement pretty quickly after posting it and yours was 3 minutes later and using the old data - were you just waiting by to comment?
No, I was in front of the forum and saw the post. Happens.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-23-2014, 01:58 PM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,148,414 times
Reputation: 7738
Sort of on topic but more a little of something I found interesting. This was just laid in the redone Dilworth Plaza right in front of City Hall in Philadelphia

https://www.flickr.com/photos/125694...7/15423813239/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/125694...7/15607786651/


And the plaza itself where it resides
https://www.google.com/search?q=new+...w&ved=0CDsQ7Ak
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2015, 07:30 AM
 
Location: State of Grace
1,582 posts, read 1,136,991 times
Reputation: 2614
Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
I'm becoming more and more curious-how much longer can urban sprawl continue before it can stretch out no further? As suburbs are built further and further out, commutes will get longer and longer. The distance that this continuous urban land can spread increases as more and more jobs spread further out, and as highways are upgraded, but how much further can it go before it reaches critical mass? Eventually sprawl will have to reach a point where parts of the metro are so far from one another that they can no longer be considered suburbs or even exurbs. So how will urban sprawl play out once this "critical mass" is reached?
When the little house from the east bumps in to the little house from the west, we'll all have a party and call it a conurbation.

Can you go blind from that?


Mahrie.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2015, 01:21 PM
 
12,291 posts, read 15,187,836 times
Reputation: 8108
HSR, if it comes to the US, would definitely increase long distance commuting and sprawl. It has happened overseas. Particularly if the downtown areas near the stations are a good place to do business.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-26-2015, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,610 posts, read 3,760,401 times
Reputation: 1616
Any evidence of HSR causing sprawl overseas?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Urban Planning
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top