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Old 05-20-2014, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,704 posts, read 4,678,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
I'm really hoping that condo-living makes a return, because as suburban sprawl continues, jobs become decentralized. Take LA for my example. Had all jobs been centralized in DTLA, LA would be much more centralized. But supporters of suburban developments created the concept of "office parks" which takes away jobs from downtowns and out into little districts closer to the sprawling suburbia, thereby allowing suburban sprawl to continue growing outwards further and further from downtown. Suburbia is cheaper to live in and office parks are cheaper to run a business in. This type of growth model is practiced in Texas and Atlanta where jobs are scattered throughout the region, allowing expansive suburban growth.
This is the case in almost all cities- every major city I have lived in or been to has jobs decentralized, spread out in office parks and business districts all over the metro areas.
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Old 05-20-2014, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Opin_Yunated View Post
The trends will reverse as demographic changes will leave vacant suburban homes. Gen Y doesn't want to commute 90 minutes each way to work.
But most of them wouldn't have to anyway- as has been discussed, job centers are scattered all over most metro areas. You can be 45 minutes out from downtown and still be very close to another job center. Living in suburbia but yet being walking or very short driving distance from work.
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Old 05-20-2014, 08:43 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,035 posts, read 102,723,474 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Opin_Yunated View Post
The trends will reverse as demographic changes will leave vacant suburban homes. Gen Y doesn't want to commute 90 minutes each way to work.
Yes, they're so special, have some "Holy Grail" we as their parents didn't have! This "vacant suburban home" situation does not appear to be happening.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
They're not usually too many employment centers on the outer edge of a metro, most suburban job centers are in inner suburbs rather than the metro edges. Exceptions are if there's a pre-existing city at the edge of the city. Either way, in most metros people don't commute from one to the other if they can help it. I think in most large metros, commutes from one side to the other are really unpleasant.
Boulder, way to the NW of Denver, is a big employment center. 34 years ago, when we moved here, Denver workers stayed in Denver and Boulder in Boulder. Today, not so much. Broomfield, also NW of Denver by about 20 miles, has a large office park with lots of employers. Aurora, on the east side (though not far east, has a border with Denver) got the health science center when they expanded. The Denver Tech Center, south of Denver, has a huge number of jobs.
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Old 05-20-2014, 08:47 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Boulder, way to the NW of Denver, is a big employment center. 34 years ago, when we moved here, Denver workers stayed in Denver and Boulder in Boulder. Today, not so much. Broomfield, also NW of Denver by about 20 miles, has a large office park with lots of employers. Aurora, on the east side (though not far east, has a border with Denver) got the health science center when they expanded. The Denver Tech Center, south of Denver, has a huge number of jobs.
I was thinking of Boulder as one of the exceptions (pre-existing city on the edge of metro, and the university helped it as a job center). Broomfield doesn't follow the pattern I mentioned, but the other two sound like they're on the inner part of the metro.

Last edited by nei; 05-20-2014 at 09:09 AM..
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:00 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 28 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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^^Aurora is an inner-suburb in some ways, but it goes way east and there's nothing much else east of it. The tech center has a small amount of land in Denver, but most of it is south of the city and it goes south for several miles. https://www.google.com/search?q=denv...x-a&channel=sb It's not exactly "inner-ring".
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Old 05-20-2014, 09:09 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Ah. It's a bit further out than I thought.
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Old 05-20-2014, 03:28 PM
bu2
 
10,092 posts, read 6,471,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OuttaTheLouBurbs View Post
I'm becoming more and more curious-how much longer can urban sprawl continue before it can stretch out no further? As suburbs are built further and further out, commutes will get longer and longer. The distance that this continuous urban land can spread increases as more and more jobs spread further out, and as highways are upgraded, but how much further can it go before it reaches critical mass? Eventually sprawl will have to reach a point where parts of the metro are so far from one another that they can no longer be considered suburbs or even exurbs. So how will urban sprawl play out once this "critical mass" is reached?
Never.

Metro areas will just blend into each other with pockets of employment all along the way. See the Washington to Boston corridor.

That's an exaggeration, but as people move out, jobs will move out, enabling development further from the old core.
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Old 05-20-2014, 03:31 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post

Metro areas will just blend into each other with pockets of employment all along the way. See the Washington to Boston corridor.
Or in the offshoot of the Northeast Corridor I live in. Once there was New Haven, Hartford and Springfield, plus scattered towns in between. Now it's just one long (80 mile) corridor with jobs and residents interspersed. The old towns and cities have more of a concentration but everything's blended together without much of a clear edge. Southward, New Haven to New York City is similar corridor but much more intensely developed.
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Old 05-20-2014, 05:45 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,473 posts, read 11,115,006 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bu2 View Post
but as people move out, jobs will move out,
But people aren't moving out as much anymore?
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Old 05-20-2014, 08:15 PM
 
6,353 posts, read 5,172,907 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Yes, they're so special, have some "Holy Grail" we as their parents didn't have! This "vacant suburban home" situation does not appear to be happening.
They can live where they want. In case you haven't noticed, many cities are thriving again. It's not because of baby boomers moving back downtown.
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