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Old 05-27-2014, 07:33 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,093 posts, read 16,130,435 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by winkosmosis View Post
You know what they say about statistics...

A commute from the closer suburbs to downtown Houston will take an hour, or 50 minutes if you're lucky.
That people that don't like them ignore them. I'm familiar with that.
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Old 05-27-2014, 08:06 PM
 
905 posts, read 798,394 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Fortunately, most of us commute by car, which means shorter commutes. Those poor obese, depressed, divorced people in NYC on the other hand...

New Yorkers have longest commute times in the U.S.: report - NY Daily News
As bad as a long train or bus ride can be, I would think it helps enormously that bus and train riders can read or do whatever, while auto commuters always need to pay attention to their driving. I don't mind driving so much, but after a day on the job driving home can be like--more work.

I was surprised to read some years ago, in the New Yorker, that one-way commutes from the far reaches of Brooklyn can take as much as 90 minutes to midtown, and that's all on the subway. Of course some transfers are involved there, and I also imagine that you'd have to be using mostly local routes. Still, for some folks I suppose that's the only practical option. As the article put it, reading material becomes a necessary consumable. One has to acknowledge the fact that many New Yorkers so often say to themselves, "Reading material! I must have more things to read!! Oh, somebody, please lay some glossy pages of three-column Times New Roman on me!!!--isn't entirely a bad thing.

Last edited by Those Who Squirm; 05-27-2014 at 08:34 PM..
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Old 05-27-2014, 08:50 PM
 
2,881 posts, read 4,624,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Those Who Squirm View Post
As bad as a long train or bus ride can be, I would think it helps enormously that bus and train riders can read or do whatever, while auto commuters always need to pay attention to their driving. I don't mind driving so much, but after a day on the job driving home can be like--more work.

I was surprised to read some years ago, in the New Yorker, that one-way commutes from the far reaches of Brooklyn can take as much as 90 minutes to midtown, and that's all on the subway. Of course some transfers are involved there, and I also imagine that you'd have to be using mostly local routes. Still, for some folks I suppose that's the only practical option. As the article put it, reading material becomes a necessary consumable. One has to acknowledge the fact that so many New Yorkers so often say to themselves, "Reading material! I must have more things to read!! Oh, somebody, please lay some glossy three-column Times New Roman on me!!!--isn't entirely a bad thing.
Yup. Of course, driving is simply not an option because of traffic and parking, although people born and raised in the boroughs seem to know their ways around and can accomplish it! I'm always amazed at folks who can drive into Manhattan--read "amazed", not envious. But PT commuting is a process, often a compromise and a often a chore. Whether car use is the worse choice is another issue; I'm just often bemused at comments that sometimes suggest PT is like a magic carpet ride. Just like driving, it can be a major drag.
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Old 05-28-2014, 06:08 AM
 
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I suppose life is easier for those of us who live within walking distance of work!
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Old 05-28-2014, 07:41 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
A rail commute to Manhattan is usually faster than driving the same commute, so not many drive. However, this situation means driving is really slow. Other commutes that rail doesn't cover are generally faster and traffic isn't as bad.
Maybe this is a good example. Other than express or very limited stop services (such as commuter rail) transit speeds don't vary too much. I checked a friend Brooklyn to Manhattan commute. Door to door google maps says 24 minutes by subway, and that's assuming little or no waiting for the train. Distance around 4.5 miles. Sounds slow, right? Not really. Google maps driving time with traffic is 25 minutes. It's a bit past rush hour, so it would have been worse say one hour ago. Driving speed decreases drastically in congested areas, so transit can be competitive*. It's a trade off in congested areas: average speeds are lower, but distances are lower, too, so it somewhat balances. But in a large metro like NYC distances can be large so commutes are often long.

*Transit comes out even better in this situation than time implies. Parking at one end would be either expensive or so time consuming to find it would take nearly as long as the 25 minute trip itself. The other direction back to Brooklyn isn't so bad, under a 5 minute search, usually better. And this person in real life has no car as he doesn't see much benefit in owning one.
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Old 05-28-2014, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Northville, MI
11,882 posts, read 11,198,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
A rail commute to Manhattan is usually faster than driving the same commute, so not many drive. However, this situation means driving is really slow. Other commutes that rail doesn't cover are generally faster and traffic isn't as bad.
The bus takes me 53 minutes to reach times square, but trains take a longer time. So train isn't the fastest way for everyone. Additionally, towns like freehold, East Brunswick, Manalapan, Monroe, and toms river entirely rely upon good bus services to reach NYC. Traffic along route 9 is horrific, but no train service is provided as an alternative to this commute. The MOM network would really help out a lot for CNJ commuters. Its predicted to induce a ridership of 50,000+ people daily, making it a very busy network.

http://www.njtransit.com/tm/tm_servl...n=MOMProjectTo

Last edited by Adi from the Brunswicks; 05-28-2014 at 08:22 AM..
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Old 05-28-2014, 09:20 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,568 posts, read 17,794,946 times
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As annoying as the subway can be at certain hours, my 45 minute commute on Metro-North/subway was far less stressful than my later 25 minute driving commute. On the train I would read the newspaper, eat a bagel or some other food, chat with a couple of regulars (with whom I shared the paper), etc.

On my 25 minute driving commute, I would get frustrated with traffic lights, Yell at people who cut me off, I was focused on the road, and just generally stressed out by other drivers.

Now I have a walking commute of 1 hour, way longer than the average commute, but I pass through nice neighborhoods and beautiful parks, it's entirely peaceful, I listen to books on tape and even sit on a bench for 10 minutes to have a lovely outdoor breakfast while watching dogs play. Oh, and I am probably burning off a lot of calories and my blood pressure is down. I have lost 20+ pounds in the last year without changing any eating behaviors, just walking instead of driving.

A commute is not a commute is not a commute.
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Old 05-28-2014, 09:25 AM
bg7
 
7,697 posts, read 8,193,407 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Fortunately, most of us commute by car, which means shorter commutes. Those poor obese, depressed, divorced people in NYC on the other hand...

New Yorkers have longest commute times in the U.S.: report - NY Daily News

But contrary to that notion, New Yorkers are on average happier and weigh less than most other cities.

A 45 minute one-way ride on a train to your job, if you have a seat, isn't really killing you. People snooze, read or even play cards with others (evening only) on Metro North. Plus the concession stands sell beer etc.
Car commuting is way more stressful.

Now the subway is a different animal - its much nosier, dirtier and crowded.
Train>car>subway.
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Old 05-28-2014, 10:30 AM
 
2,776 posts, read 3,596,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Fortunately, most of us commute by car, which means shorter commutes. Those poor obese, depressed, divorced people in NYC on the other hand...

New Yorkers have longest commute times in the U.S.: report - NY Daily News
Life expectancy in NYC beats the national average...

Life expectancy in New York rises; Mayor Bloomberg attributes success to city's health policies - NY Daily News

I agree that a driving commute tends to be more stressful than one on public transit.
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Old 05-28-2014, 07:34 PM
 
12,320 posts, read 15,235,133 times
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I have usually been part of a regular group on the commuter train. Sometimes we socialize in other situations. So it makes even an hour commute bearable. On the other hand a friend of mine is self employed making about half what he made as an employee. But he boasts he no longer commutes.
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