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Old 05-29-2014, 01:01 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post
Who has time to bike 15 miles to work.
My old neighbor did a few times a week, at least in good weather. Actually more like 18 miles. Some sections were relatively rural, or at least light-free. He also owns five cars.
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Old 05-29-2014, 01:13 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
Here's a few Manhattan commuters:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/27/ny...nd-fleece.html

He would bike recreationally anyway, so in his perspective he's saving time:

As he spun his wheels down South Bedford Avenue, ghostly at this hour, he reflected on his reasons for riding. “Mainly, I don’t want to take away family time to cycle. I leave when my wife and kids are sleeping, and I get home in time to have dinner,” he said. Mr. Edstrom usually commutes alone (not counting the coyote family that regularly greets him near the town of Hawthorne and trots alongside his bike)

more stories:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/27/ny...pagewanted=all
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Old 05-29-2014, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,660,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
My old neighbor did a few times a week, at least in good weather. Actually more like 18 miles. Some sections were relatively rural, or at least light-free. He also owns five cars.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Here's a few Manhattan commuters:

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/27/ny...nd-fleece.html

He would bike recreationally anyway, so in his perspective he's saving time:

As he spun his wheels down South Bedford Avenue, ghostly at this hour, he reflected on his reasons for riding. “Mainly, I don’t want to take away family time to cycle. I leave when my wife and kids are sleeping, and I get home in time to have dinner,” he said. Mr. Edstrom usually commutes alone (not counting the coyote family that regularly greets him near the town of Hawthorne and trots alongside his bike)

more stories:

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/27/ny...pagewanted=all
I notice that the long distance commuters always seem to be men, never their wives who typically have all the child care duties like carting the kids to soccer practice or doing the day care runs. They are also always men that have time/amenities to get dressed and take a shower at work. Usually well-off white collar workers who train for bike races or triathlons for a hobby.

There is still a persistent gender gap in household duties (and work environments) that make certain things like adding recreation to the morning commute, that aren't available for everyone.

It takes roughly 20-30 minutes for me to bike 5 miles on my slow bike and bicycle boulevards. And I can fathom it getting 10% faster. But anymore than that and it would cross over into now I need to bring new clothing and take a shower territory.

Anyway, here is some good info on "what keeps women away from bike commuting."
Where Are the Women Bike Commuters? | Sightline Daily
Why More Women Don't Ride | Seattle Met
Forget road safety: discover the real reasons normal women don't cycle - Telegraph
Bicycling's gender gap: It's the economy, stupid | Grist
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Old 05-29-2014, 02:14 PM
bg7
 
7,697 posts, read 8,165,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
Usually when I get out my phone I check CD! It's awfully hard to post, but fun to read.



Ha! Lawyers charge by the minute! Doctors get paid by the patient, in private practice anyway. Researchers usually are salaried but they get comp time for going over (sometimes at only 80%, though). I don't know too many transit systems that let one drink a bottle of water, let alone a beer.

Yea the Lawyers can bill for time on the train.
Doctors, like many other professionals, don't just do the work they are paid to do - you're may be thinking this like its a McDonald's job or something? I regularly see docs. reading the Lancet or the NEJM on the train - they never have enough time to do everything they need to do.

As for researchers (I'm taking university researchers - e.g. biomedical ) they don't get paid anything to start with! overtime?! What world are you living in? Ask the next post-doc you meet doing an 80-hour week when they got paid overtime!!

That's they way it is with many professions - your job goes beyond just turning up and being at work.

Most people commuting into NYC on metro north for example are professionals in some form or another.
Also Metro North, which has a yearly ridership of about 80 million, has concession stands at the platform entrances. You can buy beer, nuts, chips and sprits with mixers as you get on the train.

They only stopped full-blown bar cars about a month ago....

And if you commute down the Hudson line you get spectacular views of the Hudson river and the palisades to boot.. But in any event - you want to keep the ride reasonable - say 30-40 mins. Otherwise you'll start to get antsy.
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Old 05-29-2014, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
14,061 posts, read 16,074,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jade408 View Post

I am amazed at the number of people using laptops on a crowded bart train. One day I saw a guy in a full squat typing away on his laptop for at least 20 minutes. I thought, gee he has some serious leg strength and flexibility!
Yeah, that's me on BART usually. I'll pull the ride backwards to 16th & Mission and get on the train to get a seat routine, plus I get on at Dublin, so as long as I'm there more than about 5 minutes before the train leaves, I usually get a seat in to. If you show up right before it leaves you're generally standing. Likewise, on the way if you leave after 4 and don't backtrack to Civic Center/16th, you're not going to have a seat. I don't have the quads for even wall squatting for 45 minutes, although I do know a lady who has a rolling back that doubles as a seat.

There's definite advantages to BART but less stressful than driving? I don't find it. I mean, you have people here that go into panic attacks and think they need to be hospitalized if they have to drive for more than five minutes, so obviously people react differently to driving as well as to being jammed up into someones arm put on public transit. The only time traffic stresses me out is when I'm late, which is something I have a huge degree of control over. Rather than leave when I might make it there on time if there's abnormally light traffic and then stress out about it, I just leave so I get there early. If traffic is light I find a coffee shop and get some work done. If it's heavy, I still arrive on time.
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Old 05-29-2014, 03:02 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
I don't have long drives especially with traffic the most stressful thing there is, but eventually I get tired and bored of paying attention to the road. I don't mind subway standing that much, but 45 minutes is irritating.
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Old 05-29-2014, 03:47 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by bg7 View Post
Yea the Lawyers can bill for time on the train.
Doctors, like many other professionals, don't just do the work they are paid to do - you're may be thinking this like its a McDonald's job or something? I regularly see docs. reading the Lancet or the NEJM on the train - they never have enough time to do everything they need to do.

As for researchers (I'm taking university researchers - e.g. biomedical ) they don't get paid anything to start with! overtime?! What world are you living in? Ask the next post-doc you meet doing an 80-hour week when they got paid overtime!!

That's they way it is with many professions - your job goes beyond just turning up and being at work.

Most people commuting into NYC on metro north for example are professionals in some form or another.
Also Metro North, which has a yearly ridership of about 80 million, has concession stands at the platform entrances. You can buy beer, nuts, chips and sprits with mixers as you get on the train.

They only stopped full-blown bar cars about a month ago....

And if you commute down the Hudson line you get spectacular views of the Hudson river and the palisades to boot.. But in any event - you want to keep the ride reasonable - say 30-40 mins. Otherwise you'll start to get antsy.
I work in a doctor's office. I know what goes on there. Sure, doctors work hard, but they get paid by the patient. Lots of people read professional journals off-hours. I wasn't talking about post-docs, I was talking about people who have professional research jobs. There are a number of them in my neck of the woods, NCAR, NIST, ENRL, etc. OTOH, when my husband was a post-doc, there's no way he worked 80 hrs a week. I bet he worked about 6 hours a day most days.

Last edited by nei; 06-12-2014 at 07:13 PM.. Reason: unnecesary
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Old 05-29-2014, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
27,165 posts, read 29,660,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Yeah, that's me on BART usually. I'll pull the ride backwards to 16th & Mission and get on the train to get a seat routine, plus I get on at Dublin, so as long as I'm there more than about 5 minutes before the train leaves, I usually get a seat in to. If you show up right before it leaves you're generally standing. Likewise, on the way if you leave after 4 and don't backtrack to Civic Center/16th, you're not going to have a seat. I don't have the quads for even wall squatting for 45 minutes, although I do know a lady who has a rolling back that doubles as a seat.

There's definite advantages to BART but less stressful than driving? I don't find it. I mean, you have people here that go into panic attacks and think they need to be hospitalized if they have to drive for more than five minutes, so obviously people react differently to driving as well as to being jammed up into someones arm put on public transit. The only time traffic stresses me out is when I'm late, which is something I have a huge degree of control over. Rather than leave when I might make it there on time if there's abnormally light traffic and then stress out about it, I just leave so I get there early. If traffic is light I find a coffee shop and get some work done. If it's heavy, I still arrive on time.
I find taking BART, even when I have to stand less stressful than driving in traffic.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
I don't have long drives especially with traffic the most stressful thing there is, but eventually I get tired and bored of paying attention to the road. I don't mind subway standing that much, but 45 minutes is irritating.
Traffic sucks, because you have to be completely aware the whole time.

As for the standing thing, I think the real number is roughly 20-25 minutes in the evening. Basically, by the time I get off a billion seats free up, and it is about 20-25 minutes from downtown SF to downtown Oakland (I get off one stop after downtown). Not sure about the morning, because it is standing room only whether I get on a 19th or Macarthur. But the seats are free and clear after Montgomery in downtown SF. The train is practically empty.
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Old 05-29-2014, 06:26 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
746 posts, read 1,279,404 times
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Quote:
Los Angeles, second largest metro, has 27 minute average commute times for the drivers
Hard to believe.... Ill take your word for it. Definitely surprising though.

Subway in NYC can be incredibly convenient (and fast) depending on line & route.
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Old 05-29-2014, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Maui County, HI
4,131 posts, read 6,304,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kemcnyc View Post
Hard to believe.... Ill take your word for it. Definitely surprising though.

Subway in NYC can be incredibly convenient (and fast) depending on line & route.
An average commute time means nothing. There are many people who live close to work and have virtually no commute, and the more of those people in a city, the lower the average commute number.

I've seen people on the Texas forum post that Houston only has a 30 minute or a 25 minute average commute time. Well if you live in any of the affordable suburbs and commute downtown, your commute time is about 1 hour. The average tells you nothing about what a real-world commute to downtown is like.
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