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Old 06-01-2014, 05:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
Depends on the type of train and the person.

I find sitting on the maze in my car with a nice view in a comfortable seat listening to a podcast/audio book in the car where I can control the temperature or have a nice breeze to be way less stressful than standing on a packed BART squealing along that's about 80 degrees from the meat that's packed into the grinder and smells like body odor and god knows what has been ground into the carpets over 20 years of use. I don't like it $20-30 a day more, which is why I put up with BART to avoid the cost of parking in downtown San Francisco. The other reason I take BART is it's just as fast, maybe even faster, door to door than driving. It takes a long time to park and walk to BART and wait for the train, but it also takes a long time to get across the bridge and park in San Francisco. That's atypical. In most places driving is far faster and thus less stressful, likely to cause divorce, depression, and obesity than public transit, or so the study says.

I mean, on Amtrak I'd agree. On BART no. It's not uncomfortable outside of rush hour/Giants game. It's not really comfortable either.

I hate being stuck in traffic. Having to look at miles and miles of cars in front of you is not very pleasant to me. I prefer being in a crowd of people than stuck in a 'crowd' of automobiles. Its also a lot safer and cheaper to commute by rail, especially if you're going into the city or to downtown where there's no convenient place to park your car, that doesn't cost you an arm and a leg. Most BART commuters to the city work in the financial district, and are very well-behaved and dressed. They are very different then the crowd who tend to take the city buses for example. So I never feel like I'm going to be mugged or something.
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Old 06-01-2014, 08:58 AM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
How long does that take? The Hudson sounds rough to kayak on.
I don't know. Pretty long, though, I suppose. I would imagine he only does it when the water is relatively placid. I have to doubt it is a day in-day out thing. Conditions are variable, the river can be ice -packed in winter, and these days with the replacement of the Tappan Zee bridge, it is a construction zone in the water. The guy is also an ultra runner/endurance athlete type, I think. Not just a schmo.

But it is one of the more unusual commutes I have ever heard of.

Speaking of unusual commutes, I used to work at the top of a mountain and my commute involved about a half an hour of driving followed by a 15 minute trip on an aerial tramway that rose over 4,000 feet to the top of the 10,000 foot mountain. That was my favorite commute. Better than driving or a train. And I suppose if the tram ever failed, the 1,000 ft drop to the canyon floor would be the ultimate definition of a killer commute.

Sandia Peak Ski & Tramway - Sandia Peak Tramway
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Old 06-01-2014, 09:42 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
A rail commute to Manhattan is usually faster than driving the same commute, so not many drive. However, this situation means driving is really slow. Other commutes that rail doesn't cover are generally faster and traffic isn't as bad.
http://wagner.nyu.edu/files/rudincen...nCommuting.pdf

[Figure 19]

The average subway commute (46 minutes) is faster than the average car commute (50 minutes).
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Old 06-01-2014, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Savannah
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For urban areas where mass transit is not a realistic or convenient option for most commuters, what is the message for the voters to begin to value mass transit? For years, the mantra in this country has been one of individual freedom, and mass transit has been seen as antithetical to that.
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Old 06-01-2014, 12:27 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cisco kid View Post
I hate being stuck in traffic. Having to look at miles and miles of cars in front of you is not very pleasant to me. I prefer being in a crowd of people than stuck in a 'crowd' of automobiles. Its also a lot safer and cheaper to commute by rail, especially if you're going into the city or to downtown where there's no convenient place to park your car, that doesn't cost you an arm and a leg. Most BART commuters to the city work in the financial district, and are very well-behaved and dressed. They are very different then the crowd who tend to take the city buses for example. So I never feel like I'm going to be mugged or something.
At commute hours.

I don't work a typical 8-5 shift, so I'll often be taking BART back in the early afternoon. It's not much different that the bus demographic then at least until you get past Oakland. It's pretty mixed. Depends on the bus, of course. The demographic is pretty different. But in general, people of the low socioeconomic spectrum just don't cause me great amounts of fear like they do for you so it isn't an issue. Interestingly, a lot of the buses in Manhattan tend to be the opposite where the well-heeled ride the buses and the subway is more mixed. No different than anywhere else. Buses coming from West Seattle/White Center look completely different than buses running from Redmond to Seattle. The demographic reflects the people that live in the area.

Last edited by Malloric; 06-01-2014 at 12:43 PM..
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Old 06-01-2014, 12:40 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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The people I saw on San Francisco buses weren't exactly sketchy looking (not rush hour). Maybe they were a bit poorer than the local average.
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Old 06-01-2014, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoastalGAGuy View Post
For urban areas where mass transit is not a realistic or convenient option for most commuters, what is the message for the voters to begin to value mass transit? For years, the mantra in this country has been one of individual freedom, and mass transit has been seen as antithetical to that.
I think it's just been more about what works best. It's been a very long time since there was opposition to mass transit in NYC, or as you call it, thinking mass transit is un-American. Most of the places where there is opposition it's not because it's un-American. It's because people don't want to spend their money on it when it really benefit them. That's really just a slightly less dramatic response than is prevalent on these forums where people demand that everyone always support any transit project, no matter the cost/benefit of it, and are incensed that they should have to pay for roads.
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Old 06-01-2014, 05:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The people I saw on San Francisco buses weren't exactly sketchy looking (not rush hour). Maybe they were a bit poorer than the local average.
Try Philadelphia some time. Not only do the people look sketchy, you get conversations about who (or whose husband) just got out of jail.
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Old 06-01-2014, 05:26 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Try Philadelphia some time. Not only do the people look sketchy, you get conversations about who (or whose husband) just got out of jail.
I have. Crowd seemed less middle-class, and one ride was majority black. But nothing that sketchy. I wasn't that far out of Center City, though.

Last week I rode a local bus here and there was some guy who appeared to have Tourrette's syndrome. Or some weirdness.
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Old 06-01-2014, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Oakland, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
The people I saw on San Francisco buses weren't exactly sketchy looking (not rush hour). Maybe they were a bit poorer than the local average.
Oh there are some routes of sketchy people. Or where homeless people spend there days. Muni can smell pretty horribly sometimes. I don't take many bus routes in OAkland, my typical routes are pretty mixed, but the one that stops close by does change as it gets later. There is another I try to avoid that is really long, and usually has way too many sketchy characters all times of day. But as long as the bus is fairly clean, I don't have issues either way.
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