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Old 05-30-2014, 02:28 PM
 
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Washington D.C. has proposed to create congestion pricing for downtown DC in the future. D.C. would be the first city to create congestion pricing in the U.S. London has a similar model. Some cities charge tolls for tunnels and bridges, but this would be the first actual congestion pricing model in the U.S. Thoughts? Feelings about the concept?


Plan Calls for Congestion Pricing, More Bike Lanes, and Expanded Transit for D.C. - Housing Complex
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Old 05-30-2014, 04:21 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
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Old 05-30-2014, 06:34 PM
 
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I doubt it will happen in DC. Even if the local government wants to do it there will be pressure/restrictions put on any plan the try by the Federal Gov't which has a large amount of control over DC
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Old 05-30-2014, 07:58 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MidValleyDad View Post
I doubt it will happen in DC. Even if the local government wants to do it there will be pressure/restrictions put on any plan the try by the Federal Gov't which has a large amount of control over DC
Probably. Government employees and contractors are a powerful lobby. Even if they only drive into DC a few times a year, they will fight it. Another issue: how would it affect tourism? It could delay tourists enough to create second rush hour.
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Old 06-01-2014, 01:29 AM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Here's the effects of congestion pricing in London. Total morning peak traffic flows into central London:



You can see a change in the last decade, but the flow is dominated by rail, the change in driving is less obvious. From what I remember, DC has a higher proportion of people driving into downtown than that. A sharp drop in the beginning of the last decade. More clear when you look at just road traffic.



http://londontransportdata.wordpress...entral-london/

Some of the drop might be from other factors (increase in parking taxes?), it's hard to tell from the graph whether the timing matched the start of the congestion pricing. Interesting is that rail use barely budged. My guess is that those who had a good rail connection into the city center were already using it, those driving lacked a convenient rail route (but where in London lack a good rail route to the center?)

Last edited by nei; 06-01-2014 at 01:44 AM..
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Old 06-01-2014, 10:34 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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A few more comparisons with NYC's version of "central London" — Manhattan below 60th street.

Daily travel into city center:

NYC: 3.6 million trips / day; 73.0% transit, 26.4% car (including taxi)
London: 2.1 million trips / day; 73.6% transit/day, 16% car (including taxi)

London's includes weekend trips, which probably get a higher car share. The weekday trips are skewed by walking trips by those within central London. Removing walking trips, I get a 82% transit share, 18% car share. The Manhattan core has far more residents than London's (630,000 vs about 220,000), many of whom walk to work. Once you include them, the auto commute share decreases to 14-19%, depending what the 5% other are.

weekday at morning peak (7-10 am for both cities) driving had a lower share. 86% of Manhattan commuters from outside the core took transit. While 750,000 drove in over a weekday, only 140,000 of those who drove in did so during the morning peak periods. Skimming the chart above, it looks like 90% of London commuters in the morning commute came by transit.

And no, Canary Wharf is not counted as Central London, it's well outside and small in size as a business district compared to central London.

http://wagner.nyu.edu/files/rudincen...nCommuting.pdf

http://www.nyc.gov/html/dcp/pdf/mn_c...core_study.pdf

http://www.tfl.gov.uk/cdn/static/cms...n-report-1.pdf

NYMTC Data Services
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Old 06-04-2014, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
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What you do for tourists and politicians who occasionally have to drive into the city is give an allowance of X free entries per month. Also, residents in the congestion zone need to be able to get back home without being charged. Toll-by-plate and open road tolling technology can easily determine whether you enter the congestion zone and the time of day--no need to put special microchips in the pavement or anything.
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Old 06-05-2014, 05:39 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hurricaneMan1992 View Post
What you do for tourists and politicians who occasionally have to drive into the city is give an allowance of X free entries per month. Also, residents in the congestion zone need to be able to get back home without being charged.
In London, congestion zone residents get a 90% discount.
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Old 06-05-2014, 10:43 AM
 
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In the District, a transportation planthat boosts transit and discourages driving - The Washington Post

DC Transportation Plan:

+170,000 new people
+200,000 new jobs
+200 miles of bike lanes
+Water transit system
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Old 06-05-2014, 12:32 PM
 
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“Every street’s going to prioritize pedestrians,” says moveDC’s lovely fine print - Greater Greater Washington

Wow...congestion pricing would pay for the other transit/bike/ped improvements? Innovation at it's finest! The whole country needs to start doing this.
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