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Old 05-31-2014, 07:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by GatsbyGatz View Post
Irvine, CA is exactly what you're talking about.
Santa Clarita, CA too.
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Old 05-31-2014, 09:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
No it doesn't. That is a "company town." A corporate suburb is not dominated by a single company. Plus, it was industrial.
Why no industry? What do these corporations do? Just shuffle paper (or bits) back and forth? Ordinarily, corporations make money by making things, or selling things someone made.

What is the purpose of this "corporate suburb" and how does it differ from an "edge city" or "exoburb" as we already know them?
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Old 05-31-2014, 10:42 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
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Corporate Suburb=Research Triangle Park RTP Raleigh, North Carolina
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Old 06-01-2014, 05:00 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Why no industry? What do these corporations do? Just shuffle paper (or bits) back and forth? Ordinarily, corporations make money by making things, or selling things someone made.

What is the purpose of this "corporate suburb" and how does it differ from an "edge city" or "exoburb" as we already know them?
Close to "Edge City." Why no industry? It can be dirty, and detract from high end office space. Largely headquarters, not manufacturing or providing a service. After all. If you want fast food, you don't go to McDonalds Oak Brook IL headquarters. HQ deals with corporate issues such as public and shareholder relations.
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Old 06-01-2014, 11:19 AM
 
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So what's the advantage to a remote location for headquarters, as opposed to a location in a city that already has urban infrastructure--from roads to existing financial centers?

I guess I'm resistant to the idea of placid "boutique" executive centers, but that's just my inner Chicagoan coming out. Chicago is dirty, industrial and crowded, but also an enormous finance/corporate capital, because they benefit from the same sort of infrastructure. Oak Brook is a suburb of Chicago. It seems like there is no shortage of the kind of "corporate suburb" you're looking for.
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Old 06-01-2014, 11:52 AM
 
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Probably lower rents, the threat of new business taxes. Chicago helped the suburbs with a head tax decades ago and New York once had a commuter tax, persuading firms to move out. And closer to CEO residence.
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Old 06-01-2014, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Probably lower rents, the threat of new business taxes. Chicago helped the suburbs with a head tax decades ago and New York once had a commuter tax, persuading firms to move out. And closer to CEO residence.
And the workforce.

Most of Chicago isn't middle-class, which is predominantly who works in that type of businesses. If you're a younger company with a yuppie workforce, maybe then your workforce is living mostly in the loop. If you're more of a tradition business, however, your employees are going to mostly be in the suburbs of Chicago. The other thing is sometimes there's just not room. I mean, Sacramento's downtown has tons of room. A lot of those suburban business parks in Natomas, Elk Grove, Roseville, Folsom, etc could fit into downtown Sacramento. Not all, but many. I mean, it wouldn't necessarily make sense especially with Roseville or Folsom since that's a long commute. San Francisco could not absorb a significant percentage of the office parks in the Peninsula, South Bay, or East Bay.
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Old 06-01-2014, 01:02 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by Malloric View Post
And the workforce.

Most of Chicago isn't middle-class, which is predominantly who works in that type of businesses. If you're a younger company with a yuppie workforce, maybe then your workforce is living mostly in the loop. If you're more of a tradition business, however, your employees are going to mostly be in the suburbs of Chicago.
Except moving to the suburbs would be a convenience advantage only for the suburbanites who live in that section. A company moving to suburbs north of the city center would be hard to reach for those in southern/southwestern suburbs.
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Old 06-01-2014, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Vallejo
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Except moving to the suburbs would be a convenience advantage only for the suburbanites who live in that section. A company moving to suburbs north of the city center would be hard to reach for those in southern/southwestern suburbs.
Yeah, but it's not like companies move frequently. The employees will deal with it, move, or find another job. Going forward, most people from the Bay Area for example aren't living in Walnut Creek and commuting to San Mateo or Cupertino. Seattle you try to live on the side you work on so you don't have to deal with the commute from the East Side into Seattle.
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Old 06-01-2014, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Columbus, OH
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Dublin, Ohio, is probably the best example. Home to many corporate and regional headquarters: Wendy's, Cardinal Health, Nationwide Insurance and many others. Even has its own fiber optic network.

The zoning laws are highly restrictive. A nice area to live, but taxes in the City of Dublin are pretty high.
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