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Old 06-01-2014, 05:39 PM
 
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On a PBS show about the development of the American City a few (or more) years ago I heard the Term 'Edge City' used with Tysons Corner VA being a prime example. It was described as having a daytime population of Half a Million and a night time population of under 50,000. It doesn't actually exist (depending on the exact location part of it is Vienna VA and part is McLean VA. In the years since then Tysons has grown even more and now there is more residential (but still not much in relation to the office and retail). One of the key points is that it is located next to major roads (Interstate class) to allow easy commuting. Many of us that commuted into Tysons would question the 'easy' part.
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Old 06-03-2014, 01:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
Probably lower rents, the threat of new business taxes. Chicago helped the suburbs with a head tax decades ago and New York once had a commuter tax, persuading firms to move out. And closer to CEO residence.
Assuming this city was successful and was aimed at the more affluent, wouldn't rents become higher to match their success? And what would prevent it from creating new business taxes? If they are to exclude industrial uses, they would have to have some sort of land-use authority, so they would have to form a local government in order to implement that sort of regulation. In effect, they would have to become a city--so how would they differ from other greenfield cities and edge cities?

By using the term "suburb" I assume you mean this "corporate suburb" would be dependent on an urban core city. How would this differ from existing "edge cities" (as others have mentioned) outside the urban core?
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Old 06-03-2014, 01:47 PM
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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Assuming this city was successful and was aimed at the more affluent, wouldn't rents become higher to match their success?
Not if supply is less constrained. It's easier to build in greenfield locations than in a downtown.

Fairfield County, CT (a popular location for CEOs to live) is affluent had has cheaper rents than Manhattan, except office demand is lower there so it's a slightly different situation.
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Old 06-03-2014, 07:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wburg View Post
Assuming this city was successful and was aimed at the more affluent, wouldn't rents become higher to match their success? And what would prevent it from creating new business taxes? If they are to exclude industrial uses, they would have to have some sort of land-use authority, so they would have to form a local government in order to implement that sort of regulation. In effect, they would have to become a city--so how would they differ from other greenfield cities and edge cities?

By using the term "suburb" I assume you mean this "corporate suburb" would be dependent on an urban core city. How would this differ from existing "edge cities" (as others have mentioned) outside the urban core?
I suppose Edge City is one form of corporate suburb, but (as defined by Joel Garreau) it needs five million square feet of leasable office space. I believe a corporate suburb can have less, and am looking for consensus. It is largely dependent on the central city because, although there are some startups, most tenants moved or expanded from there. As far as land use, they were usually annexed by an existing suburb.
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Old 06-03-2014, 07:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by pvande55 View Post
I suppose Edge City is one form of corporate suburb, but (as defined by Joel Garreau) it needs five million square feet of leasable office space. I believe a corporate suburb can have less, and am looking for consensus. It is largely dependent on the central city because, although there are some startups, most tenants moved or expanded from there. As far as land use, they were usually annexed by an existing suburb.
Or they seem to be formed within a town/township and are governed by that municipality.
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Old 06-03-2014, 08:07 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
Corporate Suburb=Research Triangle Park RTP Raleigh, North Carolina
When I saw this thread title, this too was my first thought.

Research Triangle Park is probably the best example of a corporate suburb since it exists as its own legal entity and doesn't belong to any of the municipalities that now surround it. When it was envisioned for a patch of woods between Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill, its central location among the three cities' corresponding universities was its intent. As the Triangle area grew, the core cities of Raleigh and Durham grew toward it while small suburban towns near it exploded (Cary in particular). To this day, RTP is still almost exclusively a corporate park/jurisdiction that bridges Durham and Wake Counties. While its future "vision" now includes housing, it's mostly served on its edges by Durham to the North & NW, Raleigh to the East, Morrisville to its Southeast and Cary to its South.
To no avail and on different occasions, Durham tried to annex RTP or at least the part of RTP that was in Durham County.

http://blog.fmrealty.com/wp-content/...angle-Map2.jpg
http://trianglegreenhomes.files.word...expressway.jpg
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Old 06-03-2014, 08:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nei View Post
Not if supply is less constrained. It's easier to build in greenfield locations than in a downtown.

Fairfield County, CT (a popular location for CEOs to live) is affluent had has cheaper rents than Manhattan, except office demand is lower there so it's a slightly different situation.
Everywhere has cheaper rents than Manhattan except maybe San Francisco. In the long run, though, what's to stop this "corporate suburb" from taking on the aspect of what it's trying to escape?
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Old 06-04-2014, 11:05 AM
 
Location: North by Northwest
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
There's certainly a lot of suburbs meeting that definition; many towns along the Main Line and US 202 in eastern Pennsylvania, quite a few Morris and Passaic County suburbs in NJ (though some of them have lost most or all of their major employers since 2008), towns along the I-270 corridor in Maryland, and much of Silicon Valley.
Not really on the "traditional" Main Line (Overbrook through Paoli), which consist first and foremost bedroom communities (there's a decent bit of office space along City Ave., but most of the remaining village centers are lower density mixed use). There's a little pocket of "corporate suburbia" along Lancaster Avenue past Villanova, but that immediately peters out when you reach historic Wayne. The traditional Main Line portion of 202 as well, owing to the proximity of KOP.

But unfettered corporate suburbia doesn't really begin until you get out to Malvern (both via 30 and 202).

Last edited by ElijahAstin; 06-04-2014 at 11:14 AM..
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Old 06-04-2014, 07:24 PM
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Location: Foot of the Rockies
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Broomfield Colorado has many hi-tech companies, Vail Resorts offices, a huge mall.
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Old 06-04-2014, 07:53 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Originally Posted by nybbler View Post
Paramus is Bergen county; I know there's a lot of retail but I don't know about corporate offices. I was thinking more Florham Park, East Hanover, Morris Township. I'm sure there's other areas.
I thought Paramus is a major corporate office center, but I'm not that familiar with North Jersey compared to many other parts of the NYC metro. The company my mom works for has its main office in Paramus, maybe its one of the few*, but I thought I've seen other company's addresses in Paramus.

*If that's true, you can probably guess what company it is. It's a fairly large company.
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