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Old 06-12-2014, 05:40 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804

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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
Is it to the point where sidewalks are often pretty deserted, even in the areas with shops? Or is it more like a decent mix of driving and walking? Were any reasons given for why Stapleton is family friendly compared to other Denver neighbourhoods? Backyards are often cited as a reason for neighbourhoods being family friendly but Stapleton seems to have smaller backyards than most of Denver.

How about Prospect in Longmont? The architecture is nice but the location might mean high car use.

I'd still like to see more quality new urbanism
Judging from streetview, it seems like much of the shopping is on the edge of the development. And a lot of the shopping is in big centers surrounded by parking rather than a main-street style shopping street. Yes, it looks safe for pedestrians but it doesn't look that enjoyable to take a stroll to, which I thought was one of the goals of "new urbanism". This is the only main-street style shopping street I could find, though maybe I missed some:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/73...31184a76da2f12

It looks like it's next to the densest housing (townhouses) I like they way some face a small park space:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7579...BiTkDWVNnw!2e0

But a lot of shopping areas are in places like this, though the biggest stores need to be in something like that in this sort of place:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7682...eTk9lS6IrQ!2e0

rather than what I thought new urbanism is supposed to recreate:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8711...sIAUTvM71A!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3178...GNgDihyEAg!2e0

Aren't there good examples of new urbanism in Canada? Would anything in Vancouver (Collingwood?) Here's one I found outside of Honolulu:

Map | Please add site_wide_title to settings.
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Old 06-12-2014, 05:51 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

Over $104,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum and additional contests are planned
 
Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14804
as to the OP, which was about Buffalo, housing prices are very low in Buffalo. I don't think pricing out people is as big a danger, as the general area prices are still quite low. And if downtown is the part of the city where lots of people visit, having adjacent neighborhoods being run down and dangerous is a big negative for the city.
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Old 06-12-2014, 07:17 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,992 posts, read 102,568,112 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Judging from streetview, it seems like much of the shopping is on the edge of the development. And a lot of the shopping is in big centers surrounded by parking rather than a main-street style shopping street. Yes, it looks safe for pedestrians but it doesn't look that enjoyable to take a stroll to, which I thought was one of the goals of "new urbanism". This is the only main-street style shopping street I could find, though maybe I missed some:

https://www.google.com/maps/place/73...31184a76da2f12

It looks like it's next to the densest housing (townhouses) I like they way some face a small park space:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7579...BiTkDWVNnw!2e0

But a lot of shopping areas are in places like this, though the biggest stores need to be in something like that in this sort of place:

https://www.google.com/maps/@39.7682...eTk9lS6IrQ!2e0

rather than what I thought new urbanism is supposed to recreate:

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.8711...sIAUTvM71A!2e0

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3178...GNgDihyEAg!2e0

Aren't there good examples of new urbanism in Canada? Would anything in Vancouver (Collingwood?) Here's one I found outside of Honolulu:

Map | Please add site_wide_title to settings.
I like your pictures. I will point out, the pic of the town in MA shows a street with 4 lanes plus parking. "Real" NU is supposed to have narrow streets, with virtually no parking! Now I don't have an issue with that, but some do.
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Old 06-12-2014, 08:47 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,920,328 times
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If you're approaching it from the perspective of city government, the principle of "urban triage" makes total sense. Build up a wealthy, dense, and walkable core, full of younger people. This will result in a lot of new revenue, due to higher property and income taxes. It will also be a relatively small drain on city resources in the longer run, since comparably few gentrifiers are parents, and given they're located in dense areas the actual public works cost of supporting them will be lower. All that additional net revenue can then be folded back into providing decent social services for the remaining, not gentrified portions of the city.

Do I want there to be a comprehensive solution to the issues of urban poverty? Of course. But this is something which needs to be addressed on the national/state level (hopefully with something like a national minimum income, single-payer health insurance, etc). Having cities themselves try and solve these issues is silly, because in many cases they're still fighting for financial survival, and need to invest every development dollar as wisely as possible.
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Old 06-12-2014, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
46,053 posts, read 29,514,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katiana View Post
I like your pictures. I will point out, the pic of the town in MA shows a street with 4 lanes plus parking. "Real" NU is supposed to have narrow streets, with virtually no parking! Now I don't have an issue with that, but some do.
You mean no parking at all or just limited amount of parking lots? Just about anything involving urbanism is fine with street parking.
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Old 06-12-2014, 09:23 AM
 
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"Walkable" is becoming the preferred term. Traditionalists don't like the term "new urbanism" as it sounds too modern. The cutting-edge types don't like "traditional neighborhood development" (a term coined by Duany, I think) because it sounds too conservative. But "walkable" serves as a middle ground. And because "walkable" doesn't mean "walking is the only means of getting around," of course you also see people driving cars and people riding bikes and people on transit. What matters is the ratio--you don't need a huge percentage of people switching modes to make a big difference in activity on the street. And if more of those people who still have cars and commute to work start walking around more often, not giving up their cars but just driving less because it's easy and fun to walk to things, that's an important shift. Not all communities developed as "walkable" do that successfully--it's not just a matter of having sidewalks in front and garages in back, because the garages become the de facto entrance, and the sidewalk-lined front yard becomes an ersatz backyard whose street is still probably too wide to be comfortable for pedestrians.
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Old 06-12-2014, 11:02 AM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
2,610 posts, read 3,760,961 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Aren't there good examples of new urbanism in Canada? Would anything in Vancouver (Collingwood?) Here's one I found outside of Honolulu:

Map | Please add site_wide_title to settings.

I meant new urbanist architecture. Some of the new urbanist architects have done pretty good work (neo-traditional but even some modern). I think in Canada, sometimes you have new urbanists involved in the urban planning, but generally not in the architecture. And you also have a lot of urban planning where I think the people involved are not officially new urbanists although they adhere to a lot of the same principles. Even with the often cited new urbanist subdivisions (Cornell in Markham, McKenzie Town in Calgary), I'm not sure if they did the architecture. I think they mostly just came up with the plan. Regarding Vancouver though, I think they do modern architecture pretty well.
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Old 06-12-2014, 01:54 PM
 
8,328 posts, read 14,560,099 times
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There isn't really such a thing as "new urbanist architecture." New Urbanism is primarily an urban planning principle rather than a school of architectural design. Urban planners learn about it, but urban planners are generally not architects. Architecture schools generally don't teach urban planning, and most recently tend to consider themselves artists, whose works don't have any responsibility to fit into a neighborhood context or setting.

The principles of new urbanism/TND/walkability/Agenda 21 conspiracy theory/etc. are really not that dependent on a particular architectural style. It's about the function, not so much the form. Obviously the emphasis is on a more vertical, closely-set general design principle, small yards and small lots, vs. the styles that depend on big lots and horizontal building forms, but there's no reason why you can't design a walkable neighborhood in a very modern style, or a throwback/revival style, or a mixture of the two.

The real-world prototypes of walkable neighborhoods, 19th and early 20th century pedestrian and streetcar neighborhoods, are often characterized by an enormous architectural variety, not a single architectural style (Sure, there are examples of streetcar neighborhoods with uniform design--but they aren't necessarily the best examples.) That's part of what makes them more fun to walk around--being "entertained" by a walk down the street doesn't mean party clowns jumping out tying balloon animals for you on every block, it means sustained visual interest with a diversity of architecture and uses. What ties them together is a unifying theme--an overall rhythm of the street, based on scale, height, overall proportion as viewed from the sidewalk and the street. Buildings don't have to match, they just have to be neighborly.
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Old 06-14-2014, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Thunder Bay, ON
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I guess you're right about New Urbanism not being about architecture. I guess I just wish there was more original and varied architecture here, whether modern or neo-traditional, and some new urbanist developments in the US do a pretty good job at that (and do include more modern designs). Although the US also has a lot of new urbanist developments that are less varied/original architecturally, similar to here in Southern Ontario.
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Old 06-14-2014, 10:56 PM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
3,067 posts, read 2,107,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
Honestly I have no idea how much hope there is for a place like Buffalo's East end, is it past the point of no return or is there still hope? I don't have any personal experience with a place like that, there's nothing like that around here.
I lean "past the point of no return" for much of it. The part closest to downtown is likely (more like guaranteed) to experience some growth thanks to the expansion of the Medical Corridor (currently home to Roswell Park and Buffalo General hospitals, soon to be home to University of Buffalo medical school, biotech startups, a new science-focused high school, etc), but aside from the handful of city blocks that will be directly affected and some others that will be indirectly affected...I can't see much reason for hope for the rest of it.

Here's a blog that compiles photographs of evidence of East Side decay, maintained by an East Side resident (he provides street addresses so you can consult Google maps if you wish to get an idea where these places are located):

fixBuffalo

Oh, and regarding vacant buildings, the city is attempting to sell a few for the price of...one dollar. I believe Detroit has a similar program. There are a few conditions that must be maintained, like living in the house for a minimum of I think three years and having a certain amount of money on hand, but the conditions in theory are pretty easy to meet. Despite that, according to the blog I reference above, one of the potential dollar houses was recently demolished (obviously these places are in pretty terrible condition, so the work required on that one was probably too daunting).
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